Limits...
Suicide and the 2008 economic recession: who is most at risk? Trends in suicide rates in England and Wales 2001-2011.

Coope C, Gunnell D, Hollingworth W, Hawton K, Kapur N, Fearn V, Wells C, Metcalfe C - Soc Sci Med (2014)

Bottom Line: We found no clear evidence of an association between trends in female suicide rates and indicators of economic recession.For the younger men (16-34 years) this change preceded the sharp increases in redundancy and unemployment rates of early 2008 and lagged behind rising trends in house repossessions and bankruptcy that began around 2003.This evidence suggests indicators of economic strain other than unemployment and redundancies, such as personal debt and house repossessions may contribute to increased suicide rates in younger-age men whilst for men aged 35-44 years old job loss and long-term unemployment is a key risk factor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Canynge Hall, 39 Whatley Road, Bristol BS8 2PS, UK. Electronic address: caroline.coope@bristol.ac.uk.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Trends in annual age-standardised suicide rates by IMD quintile (1st = most deprived to 5th = least deprived) in men (a) and women (b) aged 15–64 years in England, 2001–2011 (note scale difference: for males y-axis ranges from 0–40 per 100,000; for females y-axis ranges from 0–12 per 100,000).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151136&req=5

fig4: Trends in annual age-standardised suicide rates by IMD quintile (1st = most deprived to 5th = least deprived) in men (a) and women (b) aged 15–64 years in England, 2001–2011 (note scale difference: for males y-axis ranges from 0–40 per 100,000; for females y-axis ranges from 0–12 per 100,000).

Mentions: Fig. 4 shows trends in the annual age-standardised suicide rates by Indices of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) score quintiles in men (Fig. 4a) and women (Fig. 4b) aged 15–64 in England. The most striking feature of this figure is the three fold difference in suicide rates between the 20% most-deprived (1st quintile) and 20% least-deprived (5th quintile) areas throughout the period. Suicide rates amongst men living in the least-deprived areas (5th quintile) rose from 11.2 per 100,000 in 2007 to 13.3 per 100,000 by 2011. Suicide rates amongst men living in the most-deprived 20% of areas (1st quintile) began the decade at 34.6 per 100,000 but had declined to 31.4 per 100,000 by 2011, with an observed small rise between 2005 and 2008. Annual age-standardised suicide rates in the least-deprived 20% of women in England (Fig. 4b) were relatively stable across the decade; they began (2001) and ended (2011) the decade at 4.2 per 100,000. Suicide rates in the most-deprived 20% of women in England showed evidence of a downward trend across the period.


Suicide and the 2008 economic recession: who is most at risk? Trends in suicide rates in England and Wales 2001-2011.

Coope C, Gunnell D, Hollingworth W, Hawton K, Kapur N, Fearn V, Wells C, Metcalfe C - Soc Sci Med (2014)

Trends in annual age-standardised suicide rates by IMD quintile (1st = most deprived to 5th = least deprived) in men (a) and women (b) aged 15–64 years in England, 2001–2011 (note scale difference: for males y-axis ranges from 0–40 per 100,000; for females y-axis ranges from 0–12 per 100,000).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151136&req=5

fig4: Trends in annual age-standardised suicide rates by IMD quintile (1st = most deprived to 5th = least deprived) in men (a) and women (b) aged 15–64 years in England, 2001–2011 (note scale difference: for males y-axis ranges from 0–40 per 100,000; for females y-axis ranges from 0–12 per 100,000).
Mentions: Fig. 4 shows trends in the annual age-standardised suicide rates by Indices of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) score quintiles in men (Fig. 4a) and women (Fig. 4b) aged 15–64 in England. The most striking feature of this figure is the three fold difference in suicide rates between the 20% most-deprived (1st quintile) and 20% least-deprived (5th quintile) areas throughout the period. Suicide rates amongst men living in the least-deprived areas (5th quintile) rose from 11.2 per 100,000 in 2007 to 13.3 per 100,000 by 2011. Suicide rates amongst men living in the most-deprived 20% of areas (1st quintile) began the decade at 34.6 per 100,000 but had declined to 31.4 per 100,000 by 2011, with an observed small rise between 2005 and 2008. Annual age-standardised suicide rates in the least-deprived 20% of women in England (Fig. 4b) were relatively stable across the decade; they began (2001) and ended (2011) the decade at 4.2 per 100,000. Suicide rates in the most-deprived 20% of women in England showed evidence of a downward trend across the period.

Bottom Line: We found no clear evidence of an association between trends in female suicide rates and indicators of economic recession.For the younger men (16-34 years) this change preceded the sharp increases in redundancy and unemployment rates of early 2008 and lagged behind rising trends in house repossessions and bankruptcy that began around 2003.This evidence suggests indicators of economic strain other than unemployment and redundancies, such as personal debt and house repossessions may contribute to increased suicide rates in younger-age men whilst for men aged 35-44 years old job loss and long-term unemployment is a key risk factor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Canynge Hall, 39 Whatley Road, Bristol BS8 2PS, UK. Electronic address: caroline.coope@bristol.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus