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Development and characterization of xenograft model systems for adenoid cystic carcinoma.

Moskaluk CA, Baras AS, Mancuso SA, Fan H, Davidson RJ, Dirks DC, Golden WL, Frierson HF - Lab. Invest. (2011)

Bottom Line: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is one of the most common malignancies to arise in human salivary glands, and it also arises in the glandular tissue of other organ systems.As ACC is known to frequently contain a t(6;9) translocation that fuses the MYB and NFIB genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of 12 ACC xenograft models was performed that assayed MYB locus break-apart and MYB-NFIB locus fusion.The two related xenograft models (derived from primary and metastatic tumors, respectively, of the same human subject) were karyotyped, showing a t(1;6) translocation, suggesting MYB translocation to a novel fusion partner gene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. cam5p@virginia.edu

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Histology and immunohistochemistry of human tumors and derivative xenograft tumorsHematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained histologic images of human (H) ACC tumors and their xenografts (X). The passage number (P) of the xenograft tumor being depicted is noted in the image. Similarly, representative images of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for versican and p63 are shown for the paired samples. In all instances, the xenograft tumors recapitulated the histologic and protein expression patterns of the human tumors from which they were derived. The immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue from the same passage number xenograft as depicted in the H&E images. (original magnification x400)
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Figure 1: Histology and immunohistochemistry of human tumors and derivative xenograft tumorsHematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained histologic images of human (H) ACC tumors and their xenografts (X). The passage number (P) of the xenograft tumor being depicted is noted in the image. Similarly, representative images of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for versican and p63 are shown for the paired samples. In all instances, the xenograft tumors recapitulated the histologic and protein expression patterns of the human tumors from which they were derived. The immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue from the same passage number xenograft as depicted in the H&E images. (original magnification x400)

Mentions: All of the ACC xenografted tumors were examined histologically, either after formalin-fixation and paraffin embedding or by frozen tissue sectioning. The majority of tumors arising in xenografted mice showed the characteristic histology of the donor tumor (representative images are shown in Figure 1). Three donor tumors did not have FFPE tissue samples available for comparison (ACCX14, ACCX15 and ACCX22), but the histologic features of these xenografts were also consistent with ACC. There were several instances of spontaneous development of murine tumors in the xenograft animal colony: 2 squamous carcinomas and 4 lymphomas. These tumors were identified as contaminating artifacts of the xenografting process by microscopic examination of histologic quality control tissue preparations and by immunohistochemical characterization that was consistent with murine tissue (data not shown).


Development and characterization of xenograft model systems for adenoid cystic carcinoma.

Moskaluk CA, Baras AS, Mancuso SA, Fan H, Davidson RJ, Dirks DC, Golden WL, Frierson HF - Lab. Invest. (2011)

Histology and immunohistochemistry of human tumors and derivative xenograft tumorsHematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained histologic images of human (H) ACC tumors and their xenografts (X). The passage number (P) of the xenograft tumor being depicted is noted in the image. Similarly, representative images of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for versican and p63 are shown for the paired samples. In all instances, the xenograft tumors recapitulated the histologic and protein expression patterns of the human tumors from which they were derived. The immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue from the same passage number xenograft as depicted in the H&E images. (original magnification x400)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151120&req=5

Figure 1: Histology and immunohistochemistry of human tumors and derivative xenograft tumorsHematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained histologic images of human (H) ACC tumors and their xenografts (X). The passage number (P) of the xenograft tumor being depicted is noted in the image. Similarly, representative images of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for versican and p63 are shown for the paired samples. In all instances, the xenograft tumors recapitulated the histologic and protein expression patterns of the human tumors from which they were derived. The immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue from the same passage number xenograft as depicted in the H&E images. (original magnification x400)
Mentions: All of the ACC xenografted tumors were examined histologically, either after formalin-fixation and paraffin embedding or by frozen tissue sectioning. The majority of tumors arising in xenografted mice showed the characteristic histology of the donor tumor (representative images are shown in Figure 1). Three donor tumors did not have FFPE tissue samples available for comparison (ACCX14, ACCX15 and ACCX22), but the histologic features of these xenografts were also consistent with ACC. There were several instances of spontaneous development of murine tumors in the xenograft animal colony: 2 squamous carcinomas and 4 lymphomas. These tumors were identified as contaminating artifacts of the xenografting process by microscopic examination of histologic quality control tissue preparations and by immunohistochemical characterization that was consistent with murine tissue (data not shown).

Bottom Line: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is one of the most common malignancies to arise in human salivary glands, and it also arises in the glandular tissue of other organ systems.As ACC is known to frequently contain a t(6;9) translocation that fuses the MYB and NFIB genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of 12 ACC xenograft models was performed that assayed MYB locus break-apart and MYB-NFIB locus fusion.The two related xenograft models (derived from primary and metastatic tumors, respectively, of the same human subject) were karyotyped, showing a t(1;6) translocation, suggesting MYB translocation to a novel fusion partner gene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. cam5p@virginia.edu

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus