Limits...
Fabrication of graphene-isolated-Au-nanocrystal nanostructures for multimodal cell imaging and photothermal-enhanced chemotherapy.

Bian X, Song ZL, Qian Y, Gao W, Cheng ZQ, Chen L, Liang H, Ding D, Nie XK, Chen Z, Tan W - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: First, as surface-enhanced-Raman-scattering substrates, GIANs quench background fluorescence and reduce photocarbonization or photobleaching of analytes.Controlled release of DOX molecules from GIANs is achieved through NIR heating, significantly reducing the possibility of side effects in chemotherapy.The GIANs have high surface areas and stable thin shells, as well as unique optical and photothermal properties, making them promising nanostructures for biomedical applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Science and Biomedicine Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Bio-Sensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Biology, Collaborative Innovation Center for Chemistry and Molecular Medicine, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082, China.

ABSTRACT
Using nanomaterials to develop multimodal systems has generated cutting-edge biomedical functions. Herein, we develop a simple chemical-vapor-deposition method to fabricate graphene-isolated-Au-nanocrystal (GIAN) nanostructures. A thin layer of graphene is precisely deposited on the surfaces of gold nanocrystals to enable unique capabilities. First, as surface-enhanced-Raman-scattering substrates, GIANs quench background fluorescence and reduce photocarbonization or photobleaching of analytes. Second, GIANs can be used for multimodal cell imaging by both Raman scattering and near-infrared (NIR) two-photon luminescence. Third, GIANs provide a platform for loading anticancer drugs such as doxorubicin (DOX) for therapy. Finally, their NIR absorption properties give GIANs photothermal therapeutic capability in combination with chemotherapy. Controlled release of DOX molecules from GIANs is achieved through NIR heating, significantly reducing the possibility of side effects in chemotherapy. The GIANs have high surface areas and stable thin shells, as well as unique optical and photothermal properties, making them promising nanostructures for biomedical applications.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Advanced structural analysis and chemical properties of GIAN.(a) Schematic diagram of GIAN. (b) and (c), TEM images of GIANs. (d) Selected area electron diffraction measurement of GIANs. (e) UV-Vis spectrum of an aqueous GIAN suspension. (f) GIAN suspensions ranging from very acidic pH 3 to alkaline pH 11 conditions, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151100&req=5

f1: Advanced structural analysis and chemical properties of GIAN.(a) Schematic diagram of GIAN. (b) and (c), TEM images of GIANs. (d) Selected area electron diffraction measurement of GIANs. (e) UV-Vis spectrum of an aqueous GIAN suspension. (f) GIAN suspensions ranging from very acidic pH 3 to alkaline pH 11 conditions, respectively.

Mentions: The GIANs, synthesized as core-shell nanostructures (Fig. 1a), were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As shown in Fig. 1b, TEM imaged GIANs demonstrate a size distribution with an average diameter around 65 nm. Further higher resolution TEM images, as presented in Fig. 1c, show the GIAN as an Au nanocrystal core isolated with a shell structure of a thin layer of graphene (see the Supplementary, Fig. S1 for more TEM characterizations). Compared to other silica or alumina isolation techniques, the shell thickness of graphene synthesized here is uniform and achieved in a much more controllable manner as a result of the ultrathin and stable single-atom thickness of the graphene layer, a unique feature of GIANs.


Fabrication of graphene-isolated-Au-nanocrystal nanostructures for multimodal cell imaging and photothermal-enhanced chemotherapy.

Bian X, Song ZL, Qian Y, Gao W, Cheng ZQ, Chen L, Liang H, Ding D, Nie XK, Chen Z, Tan W - Sci Rep (2014)

Advanced structural analysis and chemical properties of GIAN.(a) Schematic diagram of GIAN. (b) and (c), TEM images of GIANs. (d) Selected area electron diffraction measurement of GIANs. (e) UV-Vis spectrum of an aqueous GIAN suspension. (f) GIAN suspensions ranging from very acidic pH 3 to alkaline pH 11 conditions, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151100&req=5

f1: Advanced structural analysis and chemical properties of GIAN.(a) Schematic diagram of GIAN. (b) and (c), TEM images of GIANs. (d) Selected area electron diffraction measurement of GIANs. (e) UV-Vis spectrum of an aqueous GIAN suspension. (f) GIAN suspensions ranging from very acidic pH 3 to alkaline pH 11 conditions, respectively.
Mentions: The GIANs, synthesized as core-shell nanostructures (Fig. 1a), were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As shown in Fig. 1b, TEM imaged GIANs demonstrate a size distribution with an average diameter around 65 nm. Further higher resolution TEM images, as presented in Fig. 1c, show the GIAN as an Au nanocrystal core isolated with a shell structure of a thin layer of graphene (see the Supplementary, Fig. S1 for more TEM characterizations). Compared to other silica or alumina isolation techniques, the shell thickness of graphene synthesized here is uniform and achieved in a much more controllable manner as a result of the ultrathin and stable single-atom thickness of the graphene layer, a unique feature of GIANs.

Bottom Line: First, as surface-enhanced-Raman-scattering substrates, GIANs quench background fluorescence and reduce photocarbonization or photobleaching of analytes.Controlled release of DOX molecules from GIANs is achieved through NIR heating, significantly reducing the possibility of side effects in chemotherapy.The GIANs have high surface areas and stable thin shells, as well as unique optical and photothermal properties, making them promising nanostructures for biomedical applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Science and Biomedicine Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Bio-Sensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Biology, Collaborative Innovation Center for Chemistry and Molecular Medicine, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082, China.

ABSTRACT
Using nanomaterials to develop multimodal systems has generated cutting-edge biomedical functions. Herein, we develop a simple chemical-vapor-deposition method to fabricate graphene-isolated-Au-nanocrystal (GIAN) nanostructures. A thin layer of graphene is precisely deposited on the surfaces of gold nanocrystals to enable unique capabilities. First, as surface-enhanced-Raman-scattering substrates, GIANs quench background fluorescence and reduce photocarbonization or photobleaching of analytes. Second, GIANs can be used for multimodal cell imaging by both Raman scattering and near-infrared (NIR) two-photon luminescence. Third, GIANs provide a platform for loading anticancer drugs such as doxorubicin (DOX) for therapy. Finally, their NIR absorption properties give GIANs photothermal therapeutic capability in combination with chemotherapy. Controlled release of DOX molecules from GIANs is achieved through NIR heating, significantly reducing the possibility of side effects in chemotherapy. The GIANs have high surface areas and stable thin shells, as well as unique optical and photothermal properties, making them promising nanostructures for biomedical applications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus