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Cooking breakfast after a brain injury.

Tanguay AN, Davidson PS, Guerrero Nuñez KV, Ferland MB - Front Behav Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize.As expected, the ABI patients had significant difficulty on all aspects of the Breakfast Task (failing to have all their foods ready at the same time, over- and under-cooking foods, setting fewer places at the table, and so on) relative to controls.These results indicate caution when endeavoring to replace traditional evaluation methods with computerized tasks for the sake of expediency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Acquired brain injury (ABI) often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients' difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize. Accordingly, we examined the usefulness of a computerized meal preparation task (the Breakfast Task; Craik and Bialystok, 2006) as an indicator of real life meal preparation skills. Twenty-two ABI patients and 22 age-matched controls completed the Breakfast Task. Patients also completed the Rehabilitation Activities of Daily Living Survey (RADLS; Salmon, 2003) and prepared actual meals that were rated by members of the clinical team. As expected, the ABI patients had significant difficulty on all aspects of the Breakfast Task (failing to have all their foods ready at the same time, over- and under-cooking foods, setting fewer places at the table, and so on) relative to controls. Surprisingly, however, patients' Breakfast Task performance was not correlated with their in vivo meal preparation. These results indicate caution when endeavoring to replace traditional evaluation methods with computerized tasks for the sake of expediency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Average deviation of start times in seconds.
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Figure 6: Average deviation of start times in seconds.

Mentions: Each food item has an ideal start time, which is contingent on the previously-started items (except for the eggs, which take 5.5 min to cook and should be started at the onset of the task). The coffee takes 4 min to brew, so the coffee should be started 1.5 min after the eggs. If, for example, the starting time of the coffee is 0.5 min early, what will be the ideal start time of the third food, the sausage (which needs 3.5 min to cook)? In order to reduce the range of stop times, one may decide to start the third food item based on the first item (i.e., 2 min later) or the second item (i.e., 1 min later), or a combination of both (i.e., 1.75 min). The ideal start times for the third, fourth, and fifth food items are an average of the ideal start time based on the first item (e.g., 2 min for the sausage) and the relative ideal start time based on the previous food items (e.g., the actual start time of coffee +0.5 min). Absolute deviations of start time for the food items were then averaged. Patients showed a greater average deviation of start times than controls, F(1, 42) = 14.656, MSE = 0.542, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.259 (see Supplementary Table 1 and Figure 6). No main effect of the Breakfast Task Version, F(2, 84) = 1.499, MSE = 0.07, p = 0.229, η2 = 0.034, and no interaction between Group and Version, F(2, 84) = 0.018, MSE = 0.07, p = 0.982, η2 = 0.000, were found.


Cooking breakfast after a brain injury.

Tanguay AN, Davidson PS, Guerrero Nuñez KV, Ferland MB - Front Behav Neurosci (2014)

Average deviation of start times in seconds.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151095&req=5

Figure 6: Average deviation of start times in seconds.
Mentions: Each food item has an ideal start time, which is contingent on the previously-started items (except for the eggs, which take 5.5 min to cook and should be started at the onset of the task). The coffee takes 4 min to brew, so the coffee should be started 1.5 min after the eggs. If, for example, the starting time of the coffee is 0.5 min early, what will be the ideal start time of the third food, the sausage (which needs 3.5 min to cook)? In order to reduce the range of stop times, one may decide to start the third food item based on the first item (i.e., 2 min later) or the second item (i.e., 1 min later), or a combination of both (i.e., 1.75 min). The ideal start times for the third, fourth, and fifth food items are an average of the ideal start time based on the first item (e.g., 2 min for the sausage) and the relative ideal start time based on the previous food items (e.g., the actual start time of coffee +0.5 min). Absolute deviations of start time for the food items were then averaged. Patients showed a greater average deviation of start times than controls, F(1, 42) = 14.656, MSE = 0.542, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.259 (see Supplementary Table 1 and Figure 6). No main effect of the Breakfast Task Version, F(2, 84) = 1.499, MSE = 0.07, p = 0.229, η2 = 0.034, and no interaction between Group and Version, F(2, 84) = 0.018, MSE = 0.07, p = 0.982, η2 = 0.000, were found.

Bottom Line: Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize.As expected, the ABI patients had significant difficulty on all aspects of the Breakfast Task (failing to have all their foods ready at the same time, over- and under-cooking foods, setting fewer places at the table, and so on) relative to controls.These results indicate caution when endeavoring to replace traditional evaluation methods with computerized tasks for the sake of expediency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Acquired brain injury (ABI) often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients' difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize. Accordingly, we examined the usefulness of a computerized meal preparation task (the Breakfast Task; Craik and Bialystok, 2006) as an indicator of real life meal preparation skills. Twenty-two ABI patients and 22 age-matched controls completed the Breakfast Task. Patients also completed the Rehabilitation Activities of Daily Living Survey (RADLS; Salmon, 2003) and prepared actual meals that were rated by members of the clinical team. As expected, the ABI patients had significant difficulty on all aspects of the Breakfast Task (failing to have all their foods ready at the same time, over- and under-cooking foods, setting fewer places at the table, and so on) relative to controls. Surprisingly, however, patients' Breakfast Task performance was not correlated with their in vivo meal preparation. These results indicate caution when endeavoring to replace traditional evaluation methods with computerized tasks for the sake of expediency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus