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Microtubules provide directional information for core PCP function.

Matis M, Russler-Germain DA, Hu Q, Tomlin CJ, Axelrod JD - Elife (2014)

Bottom Line: Consistent with previous results, we find that the Ft/Ds/Fj-module has an effect on a MT-cytoskeleton.We show Ft/Ds/Fj-dependent initial polarization of the apical MT-cytoskeleton prior to global alignment of the core-module, reveal that the anchoring of apical non-centrosomal MTs at apical junctions is polarized, observe that directional trafficking of vesicles containing Dsh depends on Ft, and demonstrate the feasibility of this model by mathematical simulation.Together, these results support the hypothesis that Ft/Ds/Fj provides a signal to orient core PCP function via MT polarization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, United States matism@uni-muenster.de.

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Orientations of Ds gradient, MTs and core proteins correlate in late pupal wing.The mostly parallel pattern of Ds localization at or shortly after 24 hAPF generally correlates with both the MTs and core PCP polarity, although subtle divergence in the posterior suggests the possibility of other inputs that organize the MTs. (A) A low magnification image of Fmi staining and Ds::GFP at 26 hAPF with overall polarity derived from OrientationJ. Below are high magnification images from areas marked with red boxes (1–4) in top panels. Scale bars: 100 μm for top image and 7.5 μm for bottom. (B) Note the strong overlap of Fmi and Ds subcellular localization and the correspondence with MT orientation at 24 hAPF. The boxes in B correspond to the equivalent region in panel A—Box 2 and Box 5. Scale bar: 7.5 μm.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02893.013
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fig3s4: Orientations of Ds gradient, MTs and core proteins correlate in late pupal wing.The mostly parallel pattern of Ds localization at or shortly after 24 hAPF generally correlates with both the MTs and core PCP polarity, although subtle divergence in the posterior suggests the possibility of other inputs that organize the MTs. (A) A low magnification image of Fmi staining and Ds::GFP at 26 hAPF with overall polarity derived from OrientationJ. Below are high magnification images from areas marked with red boxes (1–4) in top panels. Scale bars: 100 μm for top image and 7.5 μm for bottom. (B) Note the strong overlap of Fmi and Ds subcellular localization and the correspondence with MT orientation at 24 hAPF. The boxes in B correspond to the equivalent region in panel A—Box 2 and Box 5. Scale bar: 7.5 μm.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02893.013

Mentions: One exception is the posterior margin of the wing, where Ds often appears to be oriented more posteriorly than is Fmi, though overall levels of asymmetry are modest (Figure 3—figure supplement 4, box 5). In this region, Ds and Fmi polarities therefore appear to be less tightly coupled. While we do not know the reason for this, we can speculatively suggest several possibilities. These include (1) the tendency for the core system to promote local alignment producing a more parallel arrangement than would a direct readout of the Ds pattern; (2) that oppositely oriented Ft-Ds heterodimers are unevenly distributed despite the even distribution of total Ds; (3) the tendency of MTs to align along the long axis of the cell may be stronger than the influence of Ft-Ds. Consistent with this, MT orientation correlates more strongly with the long axis of cells than with the Ds asymmetry (Figure 3—figure supplement 4, box 5). Finally, (4) we cannot rule out the possibility that other unknown signals may also be acting on MT orientation (see ‘An independent directional signal in the wing periphery?’).


Microtubules provide directional information for core PCP function.

Matis M, Russler-Germain DA, Hu Q, Tomlin CJ, Axelrod JD - Elife (2014)

Orientations of Ds gradient, MTs and core proteins correlate in late pupal wing.The mostly parallel pattern of Ds localization at or shortly after 24 hAPF generally correlates with both the MTs and core PCP polarity, although subtle divergence in the posterior suggests the possibility of other inputs that organize the MTs. (A) A low magnification image of Fmi staining and Ds::GFP at 26 hAPF with overall polarity derived from OrientationJ. Below are high magnification images from areas marked with red boxes (1–4) in top panels. Scale bars: 100 μm for top image and 7.5 μm for bottom. (B) Note the strong overlap of Fmi and Ds subcellular localization and the correspondence with MT orientation at 24 hAPF. The boxes in B correspond to the equivalent region in panel A—Box 2 and Box 5. Scale bar: 7.5 μm.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02893.013
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151085&req=5

fig3s4: Orientations of Ds gradient, MTs and core proteins correlate in late pupal wing.The mostly parallel pattern of Ds localization at or shortly after 24 hAPF generally correlates with both the MTs and core PCP polarity, although subtle divergence in the posterior suggests the possibility of other inputs that organize the MTs. (A) A low magnification image of Fmi staining and Ds::GFP at 26 hAPF with overall polarity derived from OrientationJ. Below are high magnification images from areas marked with red boxes (1–4) in top panels. Scale bars: 100 μm for top image and 7.5 μm for bottom. (B) Note the strong overlap of Fmi and Ds subcellular localization and the correspondence with MT orientation at 24 hAPF. The boxes in B correspond to the equivalent region in panel A—Box 2 and Box 5. Scale bar: 7.5 μm.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02893.013
Mentions: One exception is the posterior margin of the wing, where Ds often appears to be oriented more posteriorly than is Fmi, though overall levels of asymmetry are modest (Figure 3—figure supplement 4, box 5). In this region, Ds and Fmi polarities therefore appear to be less tightly coupled. While we do not know the reason for this, we can speculatively suggest several possibilities. These include (1) the tendency for the core system to promote local alignment producing a more parallel arrangement than would a direct readout of the Ds pattern; (2) that oppositely oriented Ft-Ds heterodimers are unevenly distributed despite the even distribution of total Ds; (3) the tendency of MTs to align along the long axis of the cell may be stronger than the influence of Ft-Ds. Consistent with this, MT orientation correlates more strongly with the long axis of cells than with the Ds asymmetry (Figure 3—figure supplement 4, box 5). Finally, (4) we cannot rule out the possibility that other unknown signals may also be acting on MT orientation (see ‘An independent directional signal in the wing periphery?’).

Bottom Line: Consistent with previous results, we find that the Ft/Ds/Fj-module has an effect on a MT-cytoskeleton.We show Ft/Ds/Fj-dependent initial polarization of the apical MT-cytoskeleton prior to global alignment of the core-module, reveal that the anchoring of apical non-centrosomal MTs at apical junctions is polarized, observe that directional trafficking of vesicles containing Dsh depends on Ft, and demonstrate the feasibility of this model by mathematical simulation.Together, these results support the hypothesis that Ft/Ds/Fj provides a signal to orient core PCP function via MT polarization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, United States matism@uni-muenster.de.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus