Limits...
De qi, a threshold of the stimulus intensity, elicits the specific response of acupoints and intrinsic change of human brain to acupuncture.

Tian DS, Xiong J, Pan Q, Liu F, Wang L, Xu SB, Huang GY, Wang W - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Results.Furthermore, acupuncture treatment induced fMRI signal increase/decrease in different brain regions although no significant change in electroencephalography.Interpretation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China.

ABSTRACT
Objectives.  De qi is the subjective constellation of sensations perceived by the acupuncturists and patients as described in several literatures, but the absence of quantitative evaluation methods in de qi restricts the use of acupuncture treatment widely in the world. In the present study, we tried to investigate the intrinsic property of de qi is and how evaluate it quantitatively. Methods. 30 healthy adult volunteers were determined to investigate intrinsic changes in the human body after acupuncture with de qi. Results. Acupuncture treatment with de qi apparently increased acupoint blood flow, tissue displacement, and the amplitude of myoelectricity after de qi on acupoints. Furthermore, acupuncture treatment induced fMRI signal increase/decrease in different brain regions although no significant change in electroencephalography. Interpretation. The intrinsic change of the subjects representing the specific response of acupoints and human brain to acupuncture indicated that de qi might be evaluated quantitatively by those above aspects, which facilitated the confirmation in validity and propagation of this treatment modality widely in the world.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Blood flow changes at acupoints following acupuncture before and after de qi. A PeriScan PIM II laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) was used in this study for analysis and processing of the acupoint blood perfusion image. Before the acupuncture needle stimulation, the basal blood flow of the healthy subjects was low and then significantly increased when deep-punctured but without De qi (P < 0.05). When the healthy subject felt de qi sensation, the skin blood flows at the acupoints were more evident than those before de qi (P < 0.01) and these changes were time-dependent (Figures 4(a1) and 4(a2) for Hegu and Figures 4(b1) and 4(b2) for Zusanli).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151069&req=5

fig4: Blood flow changes at acupoints following acupuncture before and after de qi. A PeriScan PIM II laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) was used in this study for analysis and processing of the acupoint blood perfusion image. Before the acupuncture needle stimulation, the basal blood flow of the healthy subjects was low and then significantly increased when deep-punctured but without De qi (P < 0.05). When the healthy subject felt de qi sensation, the skin blood flows at the acupoints were more evident than those before de qi (P < 0.01) and these changes were time-dependent (Figures 4(a1) and 4(a2) for Hegu and Figures 4(b1) and 4(b2) for Zusanli).

Mentions: In addition, change of blood flow in Hegu and Zusanli acupoints was determined by the LDPI technology. We found that blood flow increased transiently when the acupuncture needle was inserted into the acupoint Hegu and then reverted to baseline before de qi. When the volunteers felt the sensations of numbness, heaviness, distention, and soreness, representing de qi, the skin blood flow increased significantly and was maintained at a relatively high level for up to 6 min (D1–D6, Figures 4(a1) and 4(a2)). Similar results were also found in Zusanli acupoint (see Figures 4(b1) and 4(b2)).


De qi, a threshold of the stimulus intensity, elicits the specific response of acupoints and intrinsic change of human brain to acupuncture.

Tian DS, Xiong J, Pan Q, Liu F, Wang L, Xu SB, Huang GY, Wang W - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Blood flow changes at acupoints following acupuncture before and after de qi. A PeriScan PIM II laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) was used in this study for analysis and processing of the acupoint blood perfusion image. Before the acupuncture needle stimulation, the basal blood flow of the healthy subjects was low and then significantly increased when deep-punctured but without De qi (P < 0.05). When the healthy subject felt de qi sensation, the skin blood flows at the acupoints were more evident than those before de qi (P < 0.01) and these changes were time-dependent (Figures 4(a1) and 4(a2) for Hegu and Figures 4(b1) and 4(b2) for Zusanli).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151069&req=5

fig4: Blood flow changes at acupoints following acupuncture before and after de qi. A PeriScan PIM II laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) was used in this study for analysis and processing of the acupoint blood perfusion image. Before the acupuncture needle stimulation, the basal blood flow of the healthy subjects was low and then significantly increased when deep-punctured but without De qi (P < 0.05). When the healthy subject felt de qi sensation, the skin blood flows at the acupoints were more evident than those before de qi (P < 0.01) and these changes were time-dependent (Figures 4(a1) and 4(a2) for Hegu and Figures 4(b1) and 4(b2) for Zusanli).
Mentions: In addition, change of blood flow in Hegu and Zusanli acupoints was determined by the LDPI technology. We found that blood flow increased transiently when the acupuncture needle was inserted into the acupoint Hegu and then reverted to baseline before de qi. When the volunteers felt the sensations of numbness, heaviness, distention, and soreness, representing de qi, the skin blood flow increased significantly and was maintained at a relatively high level for up to 6 min (D1–D6, Figures 4(a1) and 4(a2)). Similar results were also found in Zusanli acupoint (see Figures 4(b1) and 4(b2)).

Bottom Line: Results.Furthermore, acupuncture treatment induced fMRI signal increase/decrease in different brain regions although no significant change in electroencephalography.Interpretation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China.

ABSTRACT
Objectives.  De qi is the subjective constellation of sensations perceived by the acupuncturists and patients as described in several literatures, but the absence of quantitative evaluation methods in de qi restricts the use of acupuncture treatment widely in the world. In the present study, we tried to investigate the intrinsic property of de qi is and how evaluate it quantitatively. Methods. 30 healthy adult volunteers were determined to investigate intrinsic changes in the human body after acupuncture with de qi. Results. Acupuncture treatment with de qi apparently increased acupoint blood flow, tissue displacement, and the amplitude of myoelectricity after de qi on acupoints. Furthermore, acupuncture treatment induced fMRI signal increase/decrease in different brain regions although no significant change in electroencephalography. Interpretation. The intrinsic change of the subjects representing the specific response of acupoints and human brain to acupuncture indicated that de qi might be evaluated quantitatively by those above aspects, which facilitated the confirmation in validity and propagation of this treatment modality widely in the world.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus