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De qi, a threshold of the stimulus intensity, elicits the specific response of acupoints and intrinsic change of human brain to acupuncture.

Tian DS, Xiong J, Pan Q, Liu F, Wang L, Xu SB, Huang GY, Wang W - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Results.Furthermore, acupuncture treatment induced fMRI signal increase/decrease in different brain regions although no significant change in electroencephalography.Interpretation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China.

ABSTRACT
Objectives.  De qi is the subjective constellation of sensations perceived by the acupuncturists and patients as described in several literatures, but the absence of quantitative evaluation methods in de qi restricts the use of acupuncture treatment widely in the world. In the present study, we tried to investigate the intrinsic property of de qi is and how evaluate it quantitatively. Methods. 30 healthy adult volunteers were determined to investigate intrinsic changes in the human body after acupuncture with de qi. Results. Acupuncture treatment with de qi apparently increased acupoint blood flow, tissue displacement, and the amplitude of myoelectricity after de qi on acupoints. Furthermore, acupuncture treatment induced fMRI signal increase/decrease in different brain regions although no significant change in electroencephalography. Interpretation. The intrinsic change of the subjects representing the specific response of acupoints and human brain to acupuncture indicated that de qi might be evaluated quantitatively by those above aspects, which facilitated the confirmation in validity and propagation of this treatment modality widely in the world.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Acupoints schematic diagram. Acupuncture was performed using sterile disposable stainless steel needles at two acupuncture points on the right extremity in separate runs: ST.36 (traditionally known as the Zusanli acupoint) on the leg and LI.4 (traditionally, the Hegu acupoint) on the hand. The acupuncture point ST.36 is located in the tibialis anterior muscle, 4 fingerbreadths below the kneecap and 1 fingerbreadth lateral from the anterior crest of the tibia. The acupoint LI.4 is located in the dorsal surface of the web between the thumb and the index finger. Recording electrode and reference electrode are placed on the distal end of acupoints in the right limbs. Ground wires were placed on the dorsal surface to avoid electrical disturbance.
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fig1: Acupoints schematic diagram. Acupuncture was performed using sterile disposable stainless steel needles at two acupuncture points on the right extremity in separate runs: ST.36 (traditionally known as the Zusanli acupoint) on the leg and LI.4 (traditionally, the Hegu acupoint) on the hand. The acupuncture point ST.36 is located in the tibialis anterior muscle, 4 fingerbreadths below the kneecap and 1 fingerbreadth lateral from the anterior crest of the tibia. The acupoint LI.4 is located in the dorsal surface of the web between the thumb and the index finger. Recording electrode and reference electrode are placed on the distal end of acupoints in the right limbs. Ground wires were placed on the dorsal surface to avoid electrical disturbance.

Mentions: The subjects were instructed to lie still and keep their eyes closed during the procedure. Acupuncture was performed using sterile disposable stainless steel needles at different acupoints. The two acupuncture points on the right extremity in separate runs: ST.36 (traditionally known as the Zusanli acupoint) on the leg and LI.4 (traditionally, the Hegu acupoint) on the hand (seen in Figure 1). The acupoint ST.36 is located in the tibialis anterior muscle, 4 fingerbreadths below the kneecap and 1 fingerbreadth lateral from the anterior crest of the tibia. The acupoint LI.4 is located in the dorsal surface of the web between the thumb and the index finger. These two acupoints were chosen because of their easy accessibility of de qi sensation and were most frequently used in acupuncture. Although several reports indicated that there was a difference in acupoints and nonacupoints when acupuncture was administrated, in the present study we only focus on the quantitative evaluation of de qi and the relationship between de qi degree and the clinical therapeutic effects.


De qi, a threshold of the stimulus intensity, elicits the specific response of acupoints and intrinsic change of human brain to acupuncture.

Tian DS, Xiong J, Pan Q, Liu F, Wang L, Xu SB, Huang GY, Wang W - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Acupoints schematic diagram. Acupuncture was performed using sterile disposable stainless steel needles at two acupuncture points on the right extremity in separate runs: ST.36 (traditionally known as the Zusanli acupoint) on the leg and LI.4 (traditionally, the Hegu acupoint) on the hand. The acupuncture point ST.36 is located in the tibialis anterior muscle, 4 fingerbreadths below the kneecap and 1 fingerbreadth lateral from the anterior crest of the tibia. The acupoint LI.4 is located in the dorsal surface of the web between the thumb and the index finger. Recording electrode and reference electrode are placed on the distal end of acupoints in the right limbs. Ground wires were placed on the dorsal surface to avoid electrical disturbance.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151069&req=5

fig1: Acupoints schematic diagram. Acupuncture was performed using sterile disposable stainless steel needles at two acupuncture points on the right extremity in separate runs: ST.36 (traditionally known as the Zusanli acupoint) on the leg and LI.4 (traditionally, the Hegu acupoint) on the hand. The acupuncture point ST.36 is located in the tibialis anterior muscle, 4 fingerbreadths below the kneecap and 1 fingerbreadth lateral from the anterior crest of the tibia. The acupoint LI.4 is located in the dorsal surface of the web between the thumb and the index finger. Recording electrode and reference electrode are placed on the distal end of acupoints in the right limbs. Ground wires were placed on the dorsal surface to avoid electrical disturbance.
Mentions: The subjects were instructed to lie still and keep their eyes closed during the procedure. Acupuncture was performed using sterile disposable stainless steel needles at different acupoints. The two acupuncture points on the right extremity in separate runs: ST.36 (traditionally known as the Zusanli acupoint) on the leg and LI.4 (traditionally, the Hegu acupoint) on the hand (seen in Figure 1). The acupoint ST.36 is located in the tibialis anterior muscle, 4 fingerbreadths below the kneecap and 1 fingerbreadth lateral from the anterior crest of the tibia. The acupoint LI.4 is located in the dorsal surface of the web between the thumb and the index finger. These two acupoints were chosen because of their easy accessibility of de qi sensation and were most frequently used in acupuncture. Although several reports indicated that there was a difference in acupoints and nonacupoints when acupuncture was administrated, in the present study we only focus on the quantitative evaluation of de qi and the relationship between de qi degree and the clinical therapeutic effects.

Bottom Line: Results.Furthermore, acupuncture treatment induced fMRI signal increase/decrease in different brain regions although no significant change in electroencephalography.Interpretation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China.

ABSTRACT
Objectives.  De qi is the subjective constellation of sensations perceived by the acupuncturists and patients as described in several literatures, but the absence of quantitative evaluation methods in de qi restricts the use of acupuncture treatment widely in the world. In the present study, we tried to investigate the intrinsic property of de qi is and how evaluate it quantitatively. Methods. 30 healthy adult volunteers were determined to investigate intrinsic changes in the human body after acupuncture with de qi. Results. Acupuncture treatment with de qi apparently increased acupoint blood flow, tissue displacement, and the amplitude of myoelectricity after de qi on acupoints. Furthermore, acupuncture treatment induced fMRI signal increase/decrease in different brain regions although no significant change in electroencephalography. Interpretation. The intrinsic change of the subjects representing the specific response of acupoints and human brain to acupuncture indicated that de qi might be evaluated quantitatively by those above aspects, which facilitated the confirmation in validity and propagation of this treatment modality widely in the world.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus