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Effects of navigated TMS on object and action naming.

Hernandez-Pavon JC, Mäkelä N, Lehtinen H, Lioumis P, Mäkelä JP - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Naming during nTMS was compared with the baseline performance.Both intrasubject and intersubject analysis showed that object naming was significantly more sensitive to nTMS.When the number of errors was compared according to a given area, nTMS to postcentral gyrus induced more errors during object than action naming.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University School of Science Espoo, Finland ; BioMag Laboratory, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital Helsinki, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to induce speech disturbances and to affect speech performance during different naming tasks. Lately, repetitive navigated TMS (nTMS) has been used for non-invasive mapping of cortical speech-related areas. Different naming tasks may give different information that can be useful for presurgical evaluation. We studied the sensitivity of object and action naming tasks to nTMS and compared the distributions of cortical sites where nTMS produced naming errors. Eight healthy subjects named pictures of objects and actions during repetitive nTMS delivered to semi-random left-hemispheric sites. Subject-validated image stacks were obtained in the baseline naming of all pictures before nTMS. Thereafter, nTMS pulse trains were delivered while the subjects were naming the images of objects or actions. The sessions were video-recorded for offline analysis. Naming during nTMS was compared with the baseline performance. The nTMS-induced naming errors were categorized by error type and location. nTMS produced no-response errors, phonological paraphasias, and semantic paraphasias. In seven out of eight subjects, nTMS produced more errors during object than action naming. Both intrasubject and intersubject analysis showed that object naming was significantly more sensitive to nTMS. When the number of errors was compared according to a given area, nTMS to postcentral gyrus induced more errors during object than action naming. Object naming is apparently more easily disrupted by TMS than action naming. Different stimulus types can be useful for locating different aspects of speech functions. This provides new possibilities in both basic and clinical research of cortical speech representations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Percentage of trials with errors out of the total number of trials during nTMS for object and action naming tasks. (B) Percentage of errors of each error category out of the total number of naming errors produced by nTMS during object naming task. (C) Percentage of errors of each error category out of the total number of naming errors produced by nTMS during action naming task.
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Figure 3: (A) Percentage of trials with errors out of the total number of trials during nTMS for object and action naming tasks. (B) Percentage of errors of each error category out of the total number of naming errors produced by nTMS during object naming task. (C) Percentage of errors of each error category out of the total number of naming errors produced by nTMS during action naming task.

Mentions: Overall 93 nTMS trains (4.5% from a total of 2056 trains) induced errors during object naming. During action naming, 33 nTMS trains (1.7% from a total of 1944 trains) induced errors (Figure 3A). In seven out of eight subjects, TMS elicited more object naming than action naming errors. In one subject, the total number of induced errors was equal in both (Table 1). Naming errors were induced when nTMS was delivered to angular gyrus (anG), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), postcentral gyrus (PoG), precentral gyrus (PrG), superior temporal gyrus (STG), middle temporal gyrus (MTG), and supramarginal gyrus (SMG) (Table 1 and Figure 2).


Effects of navigated TMS on object and action naming.

Hernandez-Pavon JC, Mäkelä N, Lehtinen H, Lioumis P, Mäkelä JP - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

(A) Percentage of trials with errors out of the total number of trials during nTMS for object and action naming tasks. (B) Percentage of errors of each error category out of the total number of naming errors produced by nTMS during object naming task. (C) Percentage of errors of each error category out of the total number of naming errors produced by nTMS during action naming task.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151040&req=5

Figure 3: (A) Percentage of trials with errors out of the total number of trials during nTMS for object and action naming tasks. (B) Percentage of errors of each error category out of the total number of naming errors produced by nTMS during object naming task. (C) Percentage of errors of each error category out of the total number of naming errors produced by nTMS during action naming task.
Mentions: Overall 93 nTMS trains (4.5% from a total of 2056 trains) induced errors during object naming. During action naming, 33 nTMS trains (1.7% from a total of 1944 trains) induced errors (Figure 3A). In seven out of eight subjects, TMS elicited more object naming than action naming errors. In one subject, the total number of induced errors was equal in both (Table 1). Naming errors were induced when nTMS was delivered to angular gyrus (anG), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), postcentral gyrus (PoG), precentral gyrus (PrG), superior temporal gyrus (STG), middle temporal gyrus (MTG), and supramarginal gyrus (SMG) (Table 1 and Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Naming during nTMS was compared with the baseline performance.Both intrasubject and intersubject analysis showed that object naming was significantly more sensitive to nTMS.When the number of errors was compared according to a given area, nTMS to postcentral gyrus induced more errors during object than action naming.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University School of Science Espoo, Finland ; BioMag Laboratory, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital Helsinki, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to induce speech disturbances and to affect speech performance during different naming tasks. Lately, repetitive navigated TMS (nTMS) has been used for non-invasive mapping of cortical speech-related areas. Different naming tasks may give different information that can be useful for presurgical evaluation. We studied the sensitivity of object and action naming tasks to nTMS and compared the distributions of cortical sites where nTMS produced naming errors. Eight healthy subjects named pictures of objects and actions during repetitive nTMS delivered to semi-random left-hemispheric sites. Subject-validated image stacks were obtained in the baseline naming of all pictures before nTMS. Thereafter, nTMS pulse trains were delivered while the subjects were naming the images of objects or actions. The sessions were video-recorded for offline analysis. Naming during nTMS was compared with the baseline performance. The nTMS-induced naming errors were categorized by error type and location. nTMS produced no-response errors, phonological paraphasias, and semantic paraphasias. In seven out of eight subjects, nTMS produced more errors during object than action naming. Both intrasubject and intersubject analysis showed that object naming was significantly more sensitive to nTMS. When the number of errors was compared according to a given area, nTMS to postcentral gyrus induced more errors during object than action naming. Object naming is apparently more easily disrupted by TMS than action naming. Different stimulus types can be useful for locating different aspects of speech functions. This provides new possibilities in both basic and clinical research of cortical speech representations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus