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Facilitated detection of social cues conveyed by familiar faces.

Visconti di Oleggio Castello M, Guntupalli JS, Yang H, Gobbini MI - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Recognition of the identity of familiar faces in conditions with poor visibility or over large changes in head angle, lighting and partial occlusion is far more accurate than recognition of unfamiliar faces in similar conditions.We found a strong effect of familiarity on the detection of these social cues, suggesting that the times to process these signals in familiar faces are markedly faster than the corresponding processing times for unfamiliar faces.In the light of these new data, hypotheses on the organization of the visual system for processing faces are formulated and discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College Hanover, NH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Recognition of the identity of familiar faces in conditions with poor visibility or over large changes in head angle, lighting and partial occlusion is far more accurate than recognition of unfamiliar faces in similar conditions. Here we used a visual search paradigm to test if one class of social cues transmitted by faces-direction of another's attention as conveyed by gaze direction and head orientation-is perceived more rapidly in personally familiar faces than in unfamiliar faces. We found a strong effect of familiarity on the detection of these social cues, suggesting that the times to process these signals in familiar faces are markedly faster than the corresponding processing times for unfamiliar faces. In the light of these new data, hypotheses on the organization of the visual system for processing faces are formulated and discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in head position of familiar faces were detected faster as compared to changes in head position of unfamiliar faces. Error bars represent 95% bootstrapped confidence intervals.
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Figure 3: Changes in head position of familiar faces were detected faster as compared to changes in head position of unfamiliar faces. Error bars represent 95% bootstrapped confidence intervals.

Mentions: We found a main effect of familiarity (X2(1) = 21.07, p < 0.0001, parameter estimate = −83.8 ms, 95% bCI: [−115.7, −52.1]), set size (X2(1) = 385.35, p < 0.0001, parameter estimate = 168.6 ms, bCI: [152.4, 185.1]), and task (X2(3) = 73.94, p < 0.0001). The strong effect of set size on target present trials for all tasks indicates that visual search for gaze direction and head angle is serial with no evidence for parallel search or pop-out. Mean slope for the RSF on target present trials for gaze detection was 91 ms/item for gaze direction and 77 ms/item for head angle. Mean difference time for detection of target social cues in familiar and unfamiliar faces was 109 ms for gaze direction and 65 ms for head angle. We found a statistical difference between the two tasks (Gaze vs. Head, parameter estimate = 62.97 ms, bCI: [49.2, 76.7]), but no difference between Task 1 and Task 2 (parameter estimate = 9.18 ms, bCI: [−11.5, 30.1]) nor between Task 3 and Task 4 (parameter estimate = 15.57 ms, bCI: [−5.1, 36.1]). For an overview of all results in the Target Present conditions see Tables 1–3, 5, and Figures 2, 3.


Facilitated detection of social cues conveyed by familiar faces.

Visconti di Oleggio Castello M, Guntupalli JS, Yang H, Gobbini MI - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Changes in head position of familiar faces were detected faster as compared to changes in head position of unfamiliar faces. Error bars represent 95% bootstrapped confidence intervals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151039&req=5

Figure 3: Changes in head position of familiar faces were detected faster as compared to changes in head position of unfamiliar faces. Error bars represent 95% bootstrapped confidence intervals.
Mentions: We found a main effect of familiarity (X2(1) = 21.07, p < 0.0001, parameter estimate = −83.8 ms, 95% bCI: [−115.7, −52.1]), set size (X2(1) = 385.35, p < 0.0001, parameter estimate = 168.6 ms, bCI: [152.4, 185.1]), and task (X2(3) = 73.94, p < 0.0001). The strong effect of set size on target present trials for all tasks indicates that visual search for gaze direction and head angle is serial with no evidence for parallel search or pop-out. Mean slope for the RSF on target present trials for gaze detection was 91 ms/item for gaze direction and 77 ms/item for head angle. Mean difference time for detection of target social cues in familiar and unfamiliar faces was 109 ms for gaze direction and 65 ms for head angle. We found a statistical difference between the two tasks (Gaze vs. Head, parameter estimate = 62.97 ms, bCI: [49.2, 76.7]), but no difference between Task 1 and Task 2 (parameter estimate = 9.18 ms, bCI: [−11.5, 30.1]) nor between Task 3 and Task 4 (parameter estimate = 15.57 ms, bCI: [−5.1, 36.1]). For an overview of all results in the Target Present conditions see Tables 1–3, 5, and Figures 2, 3.

Bottom Line: Recognition of the identity of familiar faces in conditions with poor visibility or over large changes in head angle, lighting and partial occlusion is far more accurate than recognition of unfamiliar faces in similar conditions.We found a strong effect of familiarity on the detection of these social cues, suggesting that the times to process these signals in familiar faces are markedly faster than the corresponding processing times for unfamiliar faces.In the light of these new data, hypotheses on the organization of the visual system for processing faces are formulated and discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College Hanover, NH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Recognition of the identity of familiar faces in conditions with poor visibility or over large changes in head angle, lighting and partial occlusion is far more accurate than recognition of unfamiliar faces in similar conditions. Here we used a visual search paradigm to test if one class of social cues transmitted by faces-direction of another's attention as conveyed by gaze direction and head orientation-is perceived more rapidly in personally familiar faces than in unfamiliar faces. We found a strong effect of familiarity on the detection of these social cues, suggesting that the times to process these signals in familiar faces are markedly faster than the corresponding processing times for unfamiliar faces. In the light of these new data, hypotheses on the organization of the visual system for processing faces are formulated and discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus