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Facilitated detection of social cues conveyed by familiar faces.

Visconti di Oleggio Castello M, Guntupalli JS, Yang H, Gobbini MI - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Recognition of the identity of familiar faces in conditions with poor visibility or over large changes in head angle, lighting and partial occlusion is far more accurate than recognition of unfamiliar faces in similar conditions.We found a strong effect of familiarity on the detection of these social cues, suggesting that the times to process these signals in familiar faces are markedly faster than the corresponding processing times for unfamiliar faces.In the light of these new data, hypotheses on the organization of the visual system for processing faces are formulated and discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College Hanover, NH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Recognition of the identity of familiar faces in conditions with poor visibility or over large changes in head angle, lighting and partial occlusion is far more accurate than recognition of unfamiliar faces in similar conditions. Here we used a visual search paradigm to test if one class of social cues transmitted by faces-direction of another's attention as conveyed by gaze direction and head orientation-is perceived more rapidly in personally familiar faces than in unfamiliar faces. We found a strong effect of familiarity on the detection of these social cues, suggesting that the times to process these signals in familiar faces are markedly faster than the corresponding processing times for unfamiliar faces. In the light of these new data, hypotheses on the organization of the visual system for processing faces are formulated and discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of trials with different number of stimulus array used in the experiment. Stimuli were positioned on a circle, separated by 60° from each other, making them equidistant from the fixation point and lying on a regular hexagon. Note that for set sizes of two and four there are three possible shapes that the stimuli can create (rotations of 60 and 120° of the shape depicted here), which were randomly chosen from trial to trial. See details in the text.
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Figure 1: Example of trials with different number of stimulus array used in the experiment. Stimuli were positioned on a circle, separated by 60° from each other, making them equidistant from the fixation point and lying on a regular hexagon. Note that for set sizes of two and four there are three possible shapes that the stimuli can create (rotations of 60 and 120° of the shape depicted here), which were randomly chosen from trial to trial. See details in the text.

Mentions: Stimuli were presented on a gray background (pixel intensity set to 128 for all the pixels), and were positioned approximately 6.89° from the fixation point. Each stimulus had a retinal size of approximately 4.08 × 4.08°. Intertrial intervals were randomly jittered from trial to trial, ranging from 800 to 1000 ms, during which subjects were required to maintain fixation on a black cross in the center of the screen. Stimulus presentation ended with the subject's response or after 3000 ms if no response was made. Subjects were not required to maintain fixation during stimulus presentation (Figure 1).


Facilitated detection of social cues conveyed by familiar faces.

Visconti di Oleggio Castello M, Guntupalli JS, Yang H, Gobbini MI - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Example of trials with different number of stimulus array used in the experiment. Stimuli were positioned on a circle, separated by 60° from each other, making them equidistant from the fixation point and lying on a regular hexagon. Note that for set sizes of two and four there are three possible shapes that the stimuli can create (rotations of 60 and 120° of the shape depicted here), which were randomly chosen from trial to trial. See details in the text.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151039&req=5

Figure 1: Example of trials with different number of stimulus array used in the experiment. Stimuli were positioned on a circle, separated by 60° from each other, making them equidistant from the fixation point and lying on a regular hexagon. Note that for set sizes of two and four there are three possible shapes that the stimuli can create (rotations of 60 and 120° of the shape depicted here), which were randomly chosen from trial to trial. See details in the text.
Mentions: Stimuli were presented on a gray background (pixel intensity set to 128 for all the pixels), and were positioned approximately 6.89° from the fixation point. Each stimulus had a retinal size of approximately 4.08 × 4.08°. Intertrial intervals were randomly jittered from trial to trial, ranging from 800 to 1000 ms, during which subjects were required to maintain fixation on a black cross in the center of the screen. Stimulus presentation ended with the subject's response or after 3000 ms if no response was made. Subjects were not required to maintain fixation during stimulus presentation (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Recognition of the identity of familiar faces in conditions with poor visibility or over large changes in head angle, lighting and partial occlusion is far more accurate than recognition of unfamiliar faces in similar conditions.We found a strong effect of familiarity on the detection of these social cues, suggesting that the times to process these signals in familiar faces are markedly faster than the corresponding processing times for unfamiliar faces.In the light of these new data, hypotheses on the organization of the visual system for processing faces are formulated and discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College Hanover, NH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Recognition of the identity of familiar faces in conditions with poor visibility or over large changes in head angle, lighting and partial occlusion is far more accurate than recognition of unfamiliar faces in similar conditions. Here we used a visual search paradigm to test if one class of social cues transmitted by faces-direction of another's attention as conveyed by gaze direction and head orientation-is perceived more rapidly in personally familiar faces than in unfamiliar faces. We found a strong effect of familiarity on the detection of these social cues, suggesting that the times to process these signals in familiar faces are markedly faster than the corresponding processing times for unfamiliar faces. In the light of these new data, hypotheses on the organization of the visual system for processing faces are formulated and discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus