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An information theory account of cognitive control.

Fan J - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Despite a considerable focus in the literature on the cognitive control of information processing, neural mechanisms underlying control are still unclear, and have not been characterized by considering the quantity of information to be processed.A novel and comprehensive account of cognitive control is proposed using concepts from information theory, which is concerned with communication system analysis and the quantification of information.This hypothesis and theory article justifies the validity and properties of such an account and relates experimental findings to the frontoparietal network under the framework of information theory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Queens College, The City University of New York Flushing, NY, USA ; Departments of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Our ability to efficiently process information and generate appropriate responses depends on the processes collectively called cognitive control. Despite a considerable focus in the literature on the cognitive control of information processing, neural mechanisms underlying control are still unclear, and have not been characterized by considering the quantity of information to be processed. A novel and comprehensive account of cognitive control is proposed using concepts from information theory, which is concerned with communication system analysis and the quantification of information. This account treats the brain as an information-processing entity where cognitive control and its underlying brain networks play a pivotal role in dealing with conditions of uncertainty. This hypothesis and theory article justifies the validity and properties of such an account and relates experimental findings to the frontoparietal network under the framework of information theory.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The frontoparietal network and the pivotal role of the ACC in information processing and response across domains. ACC, anterior cingulate cortex; AI, anterior insular cortex; BG, basal ganglia structures; PFC, prefrontal cortex; IPS, areas near and along the intraparietal sulcus.
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Figure 3: The frontoparietal network and the pivotal role of the ACC in information processing and response across domains. ACC, anterior cingulate cortex; AI, anterior insular cortex; BG, basal ganglia structures; PFC, prefrontal cortex; IPS, areas near and along the intraparietal sulcus.

Mentions: After quantifying the uncertainty under different conditions in a range of tasks used to study cognitive control, I attribute differences in RT and error rate across conditions in these tasks to changes in uncertainty. I also attribute task-related differences in ACC activity to these uncertainty differences. The ACC is the anterior portion of the cingulate gyrus, and is located around the genu and anterior third of the corpus callosum. It is generally considered to be a frontal limbic neocortical field and is connected with the prefrontal and parietal cortices, the primary motor cortex, and the frontal eye fields (FEF). It also receives substantial input from midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei, and from the amygdala (Vogt and Pandya, 1987). All efferents and afferents to and from the ACC travel via the cingulum bundle (Vogt and Gabriel, 1993). Coupled with other limbic and neocortical areas such as the AI, basal ganglia (BG) structures, the frontoparietal regions including the prefrontal cortex, and the parietal cortex, the ACC plays a crucial role in sensation and perception, executive control of attention (Posner and Petersen, 1990), emotion, social cognition, and response selection, preparation, and execution (Frith et al., 1991; Paus et al., 1993) (Figure 3).


An information theory account of cognitive control.

Fan J - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

The frontoparietal network and the pivotal role of the ACC in information processing and response across domains. ACC, anterior cingulate cortex; AI, anterior insular cortex; BG, basal ganglia structures; PFC, prefrontal cortex; IPS, areas near and along the intraparietal sulcus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4151034&req=5

Figure 3: The frontoparietal network and the pivotal role of the ACC in information processing and response across domains. ACC, anterior cingulate cortex; AI, anterior insular cortex; BG, basal ganglia structures; PFC, prefrontal cortex; IPS, areas near and along the intraparietal sulcus.
Mentions: After quantifying the uncertainty under different conditions in a range of tasks used to study cognitive control, I attribute differences in RT and error rate across conditions in these tasks to changes in uncertainty. I also attribute task-related differences in ACC activity to these uncertainty differences. The ACC is the anterior portion of the cingulate gyrus, and is located around the genu and anterior third of the corpus callosum. It is generally considered to be a frontal limbic neocortical field and is connected with the prefrontal and parietal cortices, the primary motor cortex, and the frontal eye fields (FEF). It also receives substantial input from midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei, and from the amygdala (Vogt and Pandya, 1987). All efferents and afferents to and from the ACC travel via the cingulum bundle (Vogt and Gabriel, 1993). Coupled with other limbic and neocortical areas such as the AI, basal ganglia (BG) structures, the frontoparietal regions including the prefrontal cortex, and the parietal cortex, the ACC plays a crucial role in sensation and perception, executive control of attention (Posner and Petersen, 1990), emotion, social cognition, and response selection, preparation, and execution (Frith et al., 1991; Paus et al., 1993) (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Despite a considerable focus in the literature on the cognitive control of information processing, neural mechanisms underlying control are still unclear, and have not been characterized by considering the quantity of information to be processed.A novel and comprehensive account of cognitive control is proposed using concepts from information theory, which is concerned with communication system analysis and the quantification of information.This hypothesis and theory article justifies the validity and properties of such an account and relates experimental findings to the frontoparietal network under the framework of information theory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Queens College, The City University of New York Flushing, NY, USA ; Departments of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Our ability to efficiently process information and generate appropriate responses depends on the processes collectively called cognitive control. Despite a considerable focus in the literature on the cognitive control of information processing, neural mechanisms underlying control are still unclear, and have not been characterized by considering the quantity of information to be processed. A novel and comprehensive account of cognitive control is proposed using concepts from information theory, which is concerned with communication system analysis and the quantification of information. This account treats the brain as an information-processing entity where cognitive control and its underlying brain networks play a pivotal role in dealing with conditions of uncertainty. This hypothesis and theory article justifies the validity and properties of such an account and relates experimental findings to the frontoparietal network under the framework of information theory.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus