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The operating performance of a biotrickling filter with Lysinibacillus fusiformis for the removal of high-loading gaseous chlorobenzene.

Li ZX, Yang BR, Jin JX, Pu YC, Ding C - Biotechnol. Lett. (2014)

Bottom Line: Removal of gaseous chlorobenzene (CB) by a biotrickling filter (BTF) filled with modified ceramics and multi-surface hollow balls during gas-liquid mass transfer at the steady state was by microbial degradation rather than dissolution in the spray liquid or emission into the atmosphere.The BTF, loaded with Lysinibacillus fusiformis, performed well for purification of high-loading CB gas.The maximum CB gas inlet loading rate, 103 g m(-3) h(-1), CB elimination capacity, 97 g m(-3) h(-1), and CB removal efficiency, 97.7 %, were reached at a spray liquid flow rate of 27.6 ml min(-1), an initial CB concentration of up to 1,300 mg m(-3), and an empty bed retention time of more than 45 s.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, YanCheng, 224051, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Removal of gaseous chlorobenzene (CB) by a biotrickling filter (BTF) filled with modified ceramics and multi-surface hollow balls during gas-liquid mass transfer at the steady state was by microbial degradation rather than dissolution in the spray liquid or emission into the atmosphere. The BTF was flexible and resistant to the acid environment of the spray liquid, with the caveat that the spray liquid should be replaced once every 6-7 days. The BTF, loaded with Lysinibacillus fusiformis, performed well for purification of high-loading CB gas. The maximum CB gas inlet loading rate, 103 g m(-3) h(-1), CB elimination capacity, 97 g m(-3) h(-1), and CB removal efficiency, 97.7 %, were reached at a spray liquid flow rate of 27.6 ml min(-1), an initial CB concentration of up to 1,300 mg m(-3), and an empty bed retention time of more than 45 s.

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Schematic diagram of the biotrickling filter (BTF)
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Fig1: Schematic diagram of the biotrickling filter (BTF)

Mentions: The BTF was made of Plexiglass, diam. 10; 120 cm (Fig. 1). The packing layer (total ht 80 cm; total volume 6.28 l) was divided by five porous clapboards into four semi-continuous separate units. The diam. of each pore was 0.8 cm and the pores were uniformly aligned on each clapboard at intervals of 0.4 cm. A rotation axis was inserted through the clapboards at the center and rotated at 40 rpm to ensure good gas–liquid mass transfer. The spray liquid, sealed in a water recirculation tank, was pumped through a peristaltic pump to the top of the BTF in a countercurrent operation and was then evenly sprayed through a sprinkler on the surface of the packing materials. The liquid CB was sealed to prevent evaporative losses to the atmosphere and boiled in a water-bath along with driving of an air flow from the air compressor to form CB gas, which flowed through a rotometer and mixed with another air flow from the air compressor to obtain the simulated waste gas. The CB loading could be controlled over an appropriate range by varying the ratio of the gas flow rate of the two rotometers. The tests were carried out under atmospheric pressure at 25 ± 2 °C. Q was 0.25–0.6 m3 h−1, Cin was 277–1,670 mg m−3, and v was 7.88–47.4 ml min−1, the corresponding EBRT was 37–90 s, and ILR was 15.7–146.18 g m−3 h−1. The spray liquid was refreshed once every cycle period during a 7 d cycle.Fig. 1


The operating performance of a biotrickling filter with Lysinibacillus fusiformis for the removal of high-loading gaseous chlorobenzene.

Li ZX, Yang BR, Jin JX, Pu YC, Ding C - Biotechnol. Lett. (2014)

Schematic diagram of the biotrickling filter (BTF)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150996&req=5

Fig1: Schematic diagram of the biotrickling filter (BTF)
Mentions: The BTF was made of Plexiglass, diam. 10; 120 cm (Fig. 1). The packing layer (total ht 80 cm; total volume 6.28 l) was divided by five porous clapboards into four semi-continuous separate units. The diam. of each pore was 0.8 cm and the pores were uniformly aligned on each clapboard at intervals of 0.4 cm. A rotation axis was inserted through the clapboards at the center and rotated at 40 rpm to ensure good gas–liquid mass transfer. The spray liquid, sealed in a water recirculation tank, was pumped through a peristaltic pump to the top of the BTF in a countercurrent operation and was then evenly sprayed through a sprinkler on the surface of the packing materials. The liquid CB was sealed to prevent evaporative losses to the atmosphere and boiled in a water-bath along with driving of an air flow from the air compressor to form CB gas, which flowed through a rotometer and mixed with another air flow from the air compressor to obtain the simulated waste gas. The CB loading could be controlled over an appropriate range by varying the ratio of the gas flow rate of the two rotometers. The tests were carried out under atmospheric pressure at 25 ± 2 °C. Q was 0.25–0.6 m3 h−1, Cin was 277–1,670 mg m−3, and v was 7.88–47.4 ml min−1, the corresponding EBRT was 37–90 s, and ILR was 15.7–146.18 g m−3 h−1. The spray liquid was refreshed once every cycle period during a 7 d cycle.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Removal of gaseous chlorobenzene (CB) by a biotrickling filter (BTF) filled with modified ceramics and multi-surface hollow balls during gas-liquid mass transfer at the steady state was by microbial degradation rather than dissolution in the spray liquid or emission into the atmosphere.The BTF, loaded with Lysinibacillus fusiformis, performed well for purification of high-loading CB gas.The maximum CB gas inlet loading rate, 103 g m(-3) h(-1), CB elimination capacity, 97 g m(-3) h(-1), and CB removal efficiency, 97.7 %, were reached at a spray liquid flow rate of 27.6 ml min(-1), an initial CB concentration of up to 1,300 mg m(-3), and an empty bed retention time of more than 45 s.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, YanCheng, 224051, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Removal of gaseous chlorobenzene (CB) by a biotrickling filter (BTF) filled with modified ceramics and multi-surface hollow balls during gas-liquid mass transfer at the steady state was by microbial degradation rather than dissolution in the spray liquid or emission into the atmosphere. The BTF was flexible and resistant to the acid environment of the spray liquid, with the caveat that the spray liquid should be replaced once every 6-7 days. The BTF, loaded with Lysinibacillus fusiformis, performed well for purification of high-loading CB gas. The maximum CB gas inlet loading rate, 103 g m(-3) h(-1), CB elimination capacity, 97 g m(-3) h(-1), and CB removal efficiency, 97.7 %, were reached at a spray liquid flow rate of 27.6 ml min(-1), an initial CB concentration of up to 1,300 mg m(-3), and an empty bed retention time of more than 45 s.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus