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Scaling and kinematics optimisation of the scapula and thorax in upper limb musculoskeletal models.

Prinold JA, Bull AM - J Biomech (2014)

Bottom Line: These rely on thorax scaling to effectively define the scapula's path but do not consider the area underneath the scapula in scaling, and assume a fixed conoid ligament length.The scapula and clavicle kinematics are optimised with the constraint that the scapula medial border does not penetrate the thorax.This method is simulated in the UK National Shoulder Model and compared to four other methods, including the standard technique, during three pull-up techniques (n=11).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK.

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Upper portion illustrates the normalisation used for the pull-up tasks: the left side shows 0% of the wide pull-up motion and the right side shows 100% of the wide pull-up motion. The trace is the force at the hand in a representative trial. The lower portion of the figure illustrates the hand position in the three pull-up tasks (viewed from behind the subject).
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f0005: Upper portion illustrates the normalisation used for the pull-up tasks: the left side shows 0% of the wide pull-up motion and the right side shows 100% of the wide pull-up motion. The trace is the force at the hand in a representative trial. The lower portion of the figure illustrates the hand position in the three pull-up tasks (viewed from behind the subject).

Mentions: Eleven consenting subjects participated (mean age: 26±3 years). Three pull-up types were performed: front, wide and reverse (Fig. 1). Subjects were instructed to perform a maximal upward movement: from hanging with arms straight to full elevation (chin above the bar). Mean activity time was 1.2 s, with ranges of: 0.8–2.2, 0.9–1.6 and 0.9–1.8 s for the front, wide and reverse pull-ups respectively. Legs were kept in a fixed position with posterior-facing heels (Fig. 1). Pull-ups dynamically cover large ranges of motion: 23–126° humerothoracic elevation and −56−10° humerothoracic axial rotation.


Scaling and kinematics optimisation of the scapula and thorax in upper limb musculoskeletal models.

Prinold JA, Bull AM - J Biomech (2014)

Upper portion illustrates the normalisation used for the pull-up tasks: the left side shows 0% of the wide pull-up motion and the right side shows 100% of the wide pull-up motion. The trace is the force at the hand in a representative trial. The lower portion of the figure illustrates the hand position in the three pull-up tasks (viewed from behind the subject).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150986&req=5

f0005: Upper portion illustrates the normalisation used for the pull-up tasks: the left side shows 0% of the wide pull-up motion and the right side shows 100% of the wide pull-up motion. The trace is the force at the hand in a representative trial. The lower portion of the figure illustrates the hand position in the three pull-up tasks (viewed from behind the subject).
Mentions: Eleven consenting subjects participated (mean age: 26±3 years). Three pull-up types were performed: front, wide and reverse (Fig. 1). Subjects were instructed to perform a maximal upward movement: from hanging with arms straight to full elevation (chin above the bar). Mean activity time was 1.2 s, with ranges of: 0.8–2.2, 0.9–1.6 and 0.9–1.8 s for the front, wide and reverse pull-ups respectively. Legs were kept in a fixed position with posterior-facing heels (Fig. 1). Pull-ups dynamically cover large ranges of motion: 23–126° humerothoracic elevation and −56−10° humerothoracic axial rotation.

Bottom Line: These rely on thorax scaling to effectively define the scapula's path but do not consider the area underneath the scapula in scaling, and assume a fixed conoid ligament length.The scapula and clavicle kinematics are optimised with the constraint that the scapula medial border does not penetrate the thorax.This method is simulated in the UK National Shoulder Model and compared to four other methods, including the standard technique, during three pull-up techniques (n=11).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus