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The influence of early aging on eye movements during motor simulation.

McCormick SA, Causer J, Holmes PS - Age (Dordr) (2014)

Bottom Line: Movement based interventions such as imagery and action observation are used increasingly to support physical rehabilitation of adults during early aging.Using eye movement metrics this paper reports findings that question the congruency of the three conditions.This concern for imagery was also seen in the less congruent temporal relationship in movement time between imagery and movement execution suggesting imagery inaccuracy in early aging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive Motor Function Group, Institute for Performance Research, Manchester Metropolitan University Cheshire Faculty, Crewe Green Road, Crewe Cheshire, CW1 5DU, UK.

ABSTRACT
Movement based interventions such as imagery and action observation are used increasingly to support physical rehabilitation of adults during early aging. The efficacy of these more covert approaches is based on an intuitively appealing assumption that movement execution, imagery and observation share neural substrate; alteration of one influences directly the function of the other two. Using eye movement metrics this paper reports findings that question the congruency of the three conditions. The data reveal that simulating movement through imagery and action observation may offer older adults movement practice conditions that are not constrained by the age-related decline observed in physical conditions. In addition, the findings provide support for action observation as a more effective technique for movement reproduction in comparison to imagery. This concern for imagery was also seen in the less congruent temporal relationship in movement time between imagery and movement execution suggesting imagery inaccuracy in early aging.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The number of fixations (mean ± SD) within the target look-zone. Each condition included 3 different target sizes and participants performed 10 reach actions to each target size. The data have been collapsed for target size
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Fig3: The number of fixations (mean ± SD) within the target look-zone. Each condition included 3 different target sizes and participants performed 10 reach actions to each target size. The data have been collapsed for target size

Mentions: The condition by size interaction revealed that more fixations were made to the large target (6 ± 6) compared to the medium target (4 ± 7, p = 0.043) in the control condition only, see Fig. 3.Fig. 3


The influence of early aging on eye movements during motor simulation.

McCormick SA, Causer J, Holmes PS - Age (Dordr) (2014)

The number of fixations (mean ± SD) within the target look-zone. Each condition included 3 different target sizes and participants performed 10 reach actions to each target size. The data have been collapsed for target size
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150898&req=5

Fig3: The number of fixations (mean ± SD) within the target look-zone. Each condition included 3 different target sizes and participants performed 10 reach actions to each target size. The data have been collapsed for target size
Mentions: The condition by size interaction revealed that more fixations were made to the large target (6 ± 6) compared to the medium target (4 ± 7, p = 0.043) in the control condition only, see Fig. 3.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Movement based interventions such as imagery and action observation are used increasingly to support physical rehabilitation of adults during early aging.Using eye movement metrics this paper reports findings that question the congruency of the three conditions.This concern for imagery was also seen in the less congruent temporal relationship in movement time between imagery and movement execution suggesting imagery inaccuracy in early aging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive Motor Function Group, Institute for Performance Research, Manchester Metropolitan University Cheshire Faculty, Crewe Green Road, Crewe Cheshire, CW1 5DU, UK.

ABSTRACT
Movement based interventions such as imagery and action observation are used increasingly to support physical rehabilitation of adults during early aging. The efficacy of these more covert approaches is based on an intuitively appealing assumption that movement execution, imagery and observation share neural substrate; alteration of one influences directly the function of the other two. Using eye movement metrics this paper reports findings that question the congruency of the three conditions. The data reveal that simulating movement through imagery and action observation may offer older adults movement practice conditions that are not constrained by the age-related decline observed in physical conditions. In addition, the findings provide support for action observation as a more effective technique for movement reproduction in comparison to imagery. This concern for imagery was also seen in the less congruent temporal relationship in movement time between imagery and movement execution suggesting imagery inaccuracy in early aging.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus