Limits...
Significantly enhanced dye removal performance of hollow tin oxide nanoparticles via carbon coating in dark environment and study of its mechanism.

Yang S, Wu Z, Huang L, Zhou B, Lei M, Sun L, Tian Q, Pan J, Wu W, Zhang H - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: The resulting products were characterized in terms of morphology, composition, and surface property by various analytical techniques.Moreover, the SnO2@C hollow nanoparticles are shown to be effective adsorbents for removing four different dyes from aqueous solutions, which is superior to the pure hollow SnO2 nanoparticles and commercial SnO2.The enhanced mechanism has also been discussed, which can be attributed to the high specific surface areas after carbon coating.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, People's Republic of China ; Laboratory of Printable Functional Nanomaterials and Printed Electronics, School of Printing and Packaging, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Understanding the correlation between physicochemical properties and morphology of nanostructures is a prerequisite for widespread applications of nanomaterials in environmental application areas. Herein, we illustrated that the uniform-sized SnO2@C hollow nanoparticles were large-scale synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The size of the core-shell hollow nanoparticles was about 56 nm, and the shell was composed of a solid carbon layer with a thickness of 2 ~ 3 nm. The resulting products were characterized in terms of morphology, composition, and surface property by various analytical techniques. Moreover, the SnO2@C hollow nanoparticles are shown to be effective adsorbents for removing four different dyes from aqueous solutions, which is superior to the pure hollow SnO2 nanoparticles and commercial SnO2. The enhanced mechanism has also been discussed, which can be attributed to the high specific surface areas after carbon coating.

No MeSH data available.


XRD patterns (a) and Raman spectra (b) of the as-obtained hollow SnO2 and hollow SnO2@C nanoparticles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150862&req=5

Figure 1: XRD patterns (a) and Raman spectra (b) of the as-obtained hollow SnO2 and hollow SnO2@C nanoparticles.

Mentions: Figure 1a shows the representative XRD patterns of the as-obtained hollow SnO2 and hollow SnO2@C nanoparticles. All of the diffraction peaks can be well indexed to the tetragonal rutile phase of SnO2 (JCPDS card No. 41-1445). The absence of characteristic peaks corresponding to impurities indicates high purity of the products [17]. The result reveals that the carbon coating process and annealing treatment will not change the structure of the SnO2. To prove the generation of the carbon layer on the as-prepared hollow SnO2 seeds, the two samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. As shown in Figure 1b, the two peaks of 1,585 and 1,360 cm−1 can be observed in the hollow SnO2@C sample, which can be attributed to the E2g vibration mode of the ordered carbon layer (G band) and the A1g vibration mode of the disordered carbon layer (D band), respectively. The peak intensity ratio (ID/IG) (ca. 0.76) calculated is a useful index for comparing the degree of crystallinity of various carbon materials; a smaller value ratio reflects a higher degree of ordering in the carbon material. The peaks at 560 and 629 cm−1 can be observed, respectively. The peak at 560 cm−1 can be assigned to the Sn-O surface vibrations; the peak at 629 cm−1 can be indexed to the A1g mode of SnO2. The above results reveal that the carbon has been successfully coated on the surface of the SnO2 nanoparticles, and the structure of SnO2 was not change.


Significantly enhanced dye removal performance of hollow tin oxide nanoparticles via carbon coating in dark environment and study of its mechanism.

Yang S, Wu Z, Huang L, Zhou B, Lei M, Sun L, Tian Q, Pan J, Wu W, Zhang H - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

XRD patterns (a) and Raman spectra (b) of the as-obtained hollow SnO2 and hollow SnO2@C nanoparticles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150862&req=5

Figure 1: XRD patterns (a) and Raman spectra (b) of the as-obtained hollow SnO2 and hollow SnO2@C nanoparticles.
Mentions: Figure 1a shows the representative XRD patterns of the as-obtained hollow SnO2 and hollow SnO2@C nanoparticles. All of the diffraction peaks can be well indexed to the tetragonal rutile phase of SnO2 (JCPDS card No. 41-1445). The absence of characteristic peaks corresponding to impurities indicates high purity of the products [17]. The result reveals that the carbon coating process and annealing treatment will not change the structure of the SnO2. To prove the generation of the carbon layer on the as-prepared hollow SnO2 seeds, the two samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. As shown in Figure 1b, the two peaks of 1,585 and 1,360 cm−1 can be observed in the hollow SnO2@C sample, which can be attributed to the E2g vibration mode of the ordered carbon layer (G band) and the A1g vibration mode of the disordered carbon layer (D band), respectively. The peak intensity ratio (ID/IG) (ca. 0.76) calculated is a useful index for comparing the degree of crystallinity of various carbon materials; a smaller value ratio reflects a higher degree of ordering in the carbon material. The peaks at 560 and 629 cm−1 can be observed, respectively. The peak at 560 cm−1 can be assigned to the Sn-O surface vibrations; the peak at 629 cm−1 can be indexed to the A1g mode of SnO2. The above results reveal that the carbon has been successfully coated on the surface of the SnO2 nanoparticles, and the structure of SnO2 was not change.

Bottom Line: The resulting products were characterized in terms of morphology, composition, and surface property by various analytical techniques.Moreover, the SnO2@C hollow nanoparticles are shown to be effective adsorbents for removing four different dyes from aqueous solutions, which is superior to the pure hollow SnO2 nanoparticles and commercial SnO2.The enhanced mechanism has also been discussed, which can be attributed to the high specific surface areas after carbon coating.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, People's Republic of China ; Laboratory of Printable Functional Nanomaterials and Printed Electronics, School of Printing and Packaging, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
Understanding the correlation between physicochemical properties and morphology of nanostructures is a prerequisite for widespread applications of nanomaterials in environmental application areas. Herein, we illustrated that the uniform-sized SnO2@C hollow nanoparticles were large-scale synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The size of the core-shell hollow nanoparticles was about 56 nm, and the shell was composed of a solid carbon layer with a thickness of 2 ~ 3 nm. The resulting products were characterized in terms of morphology, composition, and surface property by various analytical techniques. Moreover, the SnO2@C hollow nanoparticles are shown to be effective adsorbents for removing four different dyes from aqueous solutions, which is superior to the pure hollow SnO2 nanoparticles and commercial SnO2. The enhanced mechanism has also been discussed, which can be attributed to the high specific surface areas after carbon coating.

No MeSH data available.