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Evaluation of reactive oxygen metabolites in patients with non-small cell lung cancer after chemotherapy.

Wakabayashi T, Kawashima T, Matsuzawa Y - Multidiscip Respir Med (2014)

Bottom Line: As a marker of reactive oxygen species, ROMs levels were measured using the d-ROMs test.Patients who responded to chemotherapy showed significantly decreased (p = 0.014) ROMs levels after chemotherapy, whereas patients who had stable disease or progressive disease showed no change in ROMs level (p = 0.387).NSCLC patients had significantly elevated ROMs levels before chemotherapy compared with normal healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Sakura Medical Center, 564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura-shi, Chiba 285, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) after chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its association with response to treatment.

Methods: Fifty-eight untreated NSCLC patients and twenty-three healthy subjects were selected for the study. Patients received two courses of platinum-based chemotherapy and were evaluated for oxidative stress and treatment response. As a marker of reactive oxygen species, ROMs levels were measured using the d-ROMs test.

Results: ROMs level (mean ± standard deviation) before chemotherapy in NSCLC patients (416 ± 135 U.CARR) was significantly elevated (p = 0.016) compared to normal healthy subjects (320 ± 59 U.CARR). Patients who responded to chemotherapy showed significantly decreased (p = 0.014) ROMs levels after chemotherapy, whereas patients who had stable disease or progressive disease showed no change in ROMs level (p = 0.387).

Conclusions: NSCLC patients had significantly elevated ROMs levels before chemotherapy compared with normal healthy subjects. Chemotherapy may suppress ROMs production in responders but not in non-responders. ROMs level may be a predictor of clinical outcome in patients receiving chemotherapy for NSCLC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pretreatment ROMs levels (U. CARR) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer classified as responders (complete response/partial response) and non-responders (stable disease/progressive disease). Data are expressed as means ± SD. No significant difference in ROMs level was observed between responders and non-responders (p = 0.14, unpaired t-test).
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Figure 2: Pretreatment ROMs levels (U. CARR) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer classified as responders (complete response/partial response) and non-responders (stable disease/progressive disease). Data are expressed as means ± SD. No significant difference in ROMs level was observed between responders and non-responders (p = 0.14, unpaired t-test).

Mentions: In 18 patients evaluated after receiving the second course of chemotherapy, 7 patients (adenocarcinoma/squamous cell carcinoma; 5/2) were classified as responders (complete or partial response: CR/PR), while 11 patients (adenocarcinoma/squamous cell carcinoma; 9/2) were classified as non-responders (stable disease or progressive disease: SD/PD). Before chemotherapy, ROMs levels did not differ significantly between responders and non-responders (491 ± 116 vs. 471 ± 63 U. CARR; p = 0.14) (Figure 2). After the second course of chemotherapy, a significant decrease in ROMs level was observed in responders (CR/PR) (491 ± 116 vs. 391 ± 71 U. CARR, p = 0.014) (Figure 3a), while no change in ROMs level was found in non-responders (SD/PD) (471 ± 63 vs. 452 ± 60 U. CARR; p = 0.387) (Figure 3b).


Evaluation of reactive oxygen metabolites in patients with non-small cell lung cancer after chemotherapy.

Wakabayashi T, Kawashima T, Matsuzawa Y - Multidiscip Respir Med (2014)

Pretreatment ROMs levels (U. CARR) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer classified as responders (complete response/partial response) and non-responders (stable disease/progressive disease). Data are expressed as means ± SD. No significant difference in ROMs level was observed between responders and non-responders (p = 0.14, unpaired t-test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150680&req=5

Figure 2: Pretreatment ROMs levels (U. CARR) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer classified as responders (complete response/partial response) and non-responders (stable disease/progressive disease). Data are expressed as means ± SD. No significant difference in ROMs level was observed between responders and non-responders (p = 0.14, unpaired t-test).
Mentions: In 18 patients evaluated after receiving the second course of chemotherapy, 7 patients (adenocarcinoma/squamous cell carcinoma; 5/2) were classified as responders (complete or partial response: CR/PR), while 11 patients (adenocarcinoma/squamous cell carcinoma; 9/2) were classified as non-responders (stable disease or progressive disease: SD/PD). Before chemotherapy, ROMs levels did not differ significantly between responders and non-responders (491 ± 116 vs. 471 ± 63 U. CARR; p = 0.14) (Figure 2). After the second course of chemotherapy, a significant decrease in ROMs level was observed in responders (CR/PR) (491 ± 116 vs. 391 ± 71 U. CARR, p = 0.014) (Figure 3a), while no change in ROMs level was found in non-responders (SD/PD) (471 ± 63 vs. 452 ± 60 U. CARR; p = 0.387) (Figure 3b).

Bottom Line: As a marker of reactive oxygen species, ROMs levels were measured using the d-ROMs test.Patients who responded to chemotherapy showed significantly decreased (p = 0.014) ROMs levels after chemotherapy, whereas patients who had stable disease or progressive disease showed no change in ROMs level (p = 0.387).NSCLC patients had significantly elevated ROMs levels before chemotherapy compared with normal healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University Sakura Medical Center, 564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura-shi, Chiba 285, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) after chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its association with response to treatment.

Methods: Fifty-eight untreated NSCLC patients and twenty-three healthy subjects were selected for the study. Patients received two courses of platinum-based chemotherapy and were evaluated for oxidative stress and treatment response. As a marker of reactive oxygen species, ROMs levels were measured using the d-ROMs test.

Results: ROMs level (mean ± standard deviation) before chemotherapy in NSCLC patients (416 ± 135 U.CARR) was significantly elevated (p = 0.016) compared to normal healthy subjects (320 ± 59 U.CARR). Patients who responded to chemotherapy showed significantly decreased (p = 0.014) ROMs levels after chemotherapy, whereas patients who had stable disease or progressive disease showed no change in ROMs level (p = 0.387).

Conclusions: NSCLC patients had significantly elevated ROMs levels before chemotherapy compared with normal healthy subjects. Chemotherapy may suppress ROMs production in responders but not in non-responders. ROMs level may be a predictor of clinical outcome in patients receiving chemotherapy for NSCLC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus