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Pilomotor seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy: A case report with sequential changes in magnetic resonance imaging.

Kurita T, Sakurai K, Takeda Y, Kusumi I - Epilepsy Behav Case Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: Piloerection is a rare ictal manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy.Reversible magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities were visible in the right hippocampus, right uncus, and right amygdala.This case is significant in that we can follow sequential MRI from onset, and it is meaningful for considering the mesial temporal area as involved with piloerection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, North 15, West 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8648, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Piloerection is a rare ictal manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy. The case is a 38-year-old man with acute onset of repetitive pilomotor seizures. Lacking other symptoms implicating epileptic seizures, a month passed before he was diagnosed with epilepsy. Ictal electroencephalography revealed rhythmic waves in the right temporal area. Reversible magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities were visible in the right hippocampus, right uncus, and right amygdala. The appropriate antiepileptic drug therapy made him seizure-free, but following MRI, he showed right hippocampal atrophy one year after seizure cessation. This case is significant in that we can follow sequential MRI from onset, and it is meaningful for considering the mesial temporal area as involved with piloerection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

FLAIR images of MRI (A) at onset, (B) one month after onset (seizure frequency was 10 per day), (C) three months after onset (seizure-free), and (D) one year after onset (continuously seizure-free).
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f0005: FLAIR images of MRI (A) at onset, (B) one month after onset (seizure frequency was 10 per day), (C) three months after onset (seizure-free), and (D) one year after onset (continuously seizure-free).

Mentions: A 38-year-old left-handed man with no prior medical history visited the Psychiatric Department of Hokkaido University Hospital. From a month prior, he had chills on his back, felt that he was turning pale, and experienced “goose bumps”. These feelings lasted several seconds usually but up to 10 s. Before consulting our department, he had consulted the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine and Neurosurgery. Examinations conducted using echocardiography, Holter electrocardiography, and brain MRI (Fig. 1A) revealed no abnormality. Some tranquilizers were prescribed because autonomic imbalance was suspected. Although few seizures occurred at first, they increased gradually. By the time he consulted us, his spells had clustered, occurring up to 10 times per day. He was able to respond to his wife during these episodes. Moreover, he remembered details of conversations. During these episodes, he experienced no other autonomic symptoms such as tachycardia or bradycardia, motor or sensory symptom, psychiatric symptom, automatism, or loss of consciousness.


Pilomotor seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy: A case report with sequential changes in magnetic resonance imaging.

Kurita T, Sakurai K, Takeda Y, Kusumi I - Epilepsy Behav Case Rep (2013)

FLAIR images of MRI (A) at onset, (B) one month after onset (seizure frequency was 10 per day), (C) three months after onset (seizure-free), and (D) one year after onset (continuously seizure-free).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150676&req=5

f0005: FLAIR images of MRI (A) at onset, (B) one month after onset (seizure frequency was 10 per day), (C) three months after onset (seizure-free), and (D) one year after onset (continuously seizure-free).
Mentions: A 38-year-old left-handed man with no prior medical history visited the Psychiatric Department of Hokkaido University Hospital. From a month prior, he had chills on his back, felt that he was turning pale, and experienced “goose bumps”. These feelings lasted several seconds usually but up to 10 s. Before consulting our department, he had consulted the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine and Neurosurgery. Examinations conducted using echocardiography, Holter electrocardiography, and brain MRI (Fig. 1A) revealed no abnormality. Some tranquilizers were prescribed because autonomic imbalance was suspected. Although few seizures occurred at first, they increased gradually. By the time he consulted us, his spells had clustered, occurring up to 10 times per day. He was able to respond to his wife during these episodes. Moreover, he remembered details of conversations. During these episodes, he experienced no other autonomic symptoms such as tachycardia or bradycardia, motor or sensory symptom, psychiatric symptom, automatism, or loss of consciousness.

Bottom Line: Piloerection is a rare ictal manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy.Reversible magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities were visible in the right hippocampus, right uncus, and right amygdala.This case is significant in that we can follow sequential MRI from onset, and it is meaningful for considering the mesial temporal area as involved with piloerection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, North 15, West 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8648, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Piloerection is a rare ictal manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy. The case is a 38-year-old man with acute onset of repetitive pilomotor seizures. Lacking other symptoms implicating epileptic seizures, a month passed before he was diagnosed with epilepsy. Ictal electroencephalography revealed rhythmic waves in the right temporal area. Reversible magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities were visible in the right hippocampus, right uncus, and right amygdala. The appropriate antiepileptic drug therapy made him seizure-free, but following MRI, he showed right hippocampal atrophy one year after seizure cessation. This case is significant in that we can follow sequential MRI from onset, and it is meaningful for considering the mesial temporal area as involved with piloerection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus