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Surgical resection of epileptogenic cortical dysplasia in precentral gyrus.

Xue H, Cai L, Zhang X, Qiao L, Li Y - Epilepsy Behav Case Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: The lesion was resected based on the results of video-ECoG (electrocorticograph) monitoring and electrical cortical stimulation.The patient has been seizure-free for 1 year since operation, and no neurological deficits have been observed.We discuss possible mechanisms of cortical reorganization in this patient and the features of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) IIb in eloquent cortices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Institute of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
We present the case of a patient with epilepsy arising from cortical dysplasia in his precentral gyrus. The lesion was resected based on the results of video-ECoG (electrocorticograph) monitoring and electrical cortical stimulation. The patient has been seizure-free for 1 year since operation, and no neurological deficits have been observed. We discuss possible mechanisms of cortical reorganization in this patient and the features of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) IIb in eloquent cortices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

T1, T2, FLAIR MRI for this patient. The lesion was characterized by high signal intensity, located in precentral gyrus. The white matter signal alteration tapers toward the ventricle, reflecting the involvement of radial glial–neuronal units (white arrow), which is called as “transmantle sign”, first described by Barkovich in 1997, and almost exclusively found in FCD IIb [24].
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f0005: T1, T2, FLAIR MRI for this patient. The lesion was characterized by high signal intensity, located in precentral gyrus. The white matter signal alteration tapers toward the ventricle, reflecting the involvement of radial glial–neuronal units (white arrow), which is called as “transmantle sign”, first described by Barkovich in 1997, and almost exclusively found in FCD IIb [24].

Mentions: The patient was a 7-year-old boy with intractable epilepsy since 2 months after birth. Despite the antiepileptic medications oxcarbazepine: 0.15 g, Q12h and lamotrigine: 37.5 mg, Q12h, the patient suffered from seizures as frequent as 8–10 times per day. No developmental delay was found with uneventful birth history. On physical examination, no abnormal findings were noted. MRI showed abnormal signal in the left anterior central gyrus, possibly a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) (Fig. 1). Interictal EEG demonstrated spikes and slow waves in the left hemisphere (Fig. 2). Semiological studies showed seizures presenting as paroxysmal clonus of the patient's right hand and arm followed by secondary spreading to both sides.


Surgical resection of epileptogenic cortical dysplasia in precentral gyrus.

Xue H, Cai L, Zhang X, Qiao L, Li Y - Epilepsy Behav Case Rep (2013)

T1, T2, FLAIR MRI for this patient. The lesion was characterized by high signal intensity, located in precentral gyrus. The white matter signal alteration tapers toward the ventricle, reflecting the involvement of radial glial–neuronal units (white arrow), which is called as “transmantle sign”, first described by Barkovich in 1997, and almost exclusively found in FCD IIb [24].
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-SA
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150634&req=5

f0005: T1, T2, FLAIR MRI for this patient. The lesion was characterized by high signal intensity, located in precentral gyrus. The white matter signal alteration tapers toward the ventricle, reflecting the involvement of radial glial–neuronal units (white arrow), which is called as “transmantle sign”, first described by Barkovich in 1997, and almost exclusively found in FCD IIb [24].
Mentions: The patient was a 7-year-old boy with intractable epilepsy since 2 months after birth. Despite the antiepileptic medications oxcarbazepine: 0.15 g, Q12h and lamotrigine: 37.5 mg, Q12h, the patient suffered from seizures as frequent as 8–10 times per day. No developmental delay was found with uneventful birth history. On physical examination, no abnormal findings were noted. MRI showed abnormal signal in the left anterior central gyrus, possibly a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) (Fig. 1). Interictal EEG demonstrated spikes and slow waves in the left hemisphere (Fig. 2). Semiological studies showed seizures presenting as paroxysmal clonus of the patient's right hand and arm followed by secondary spreading to both sides.

Bottom Line: The lesion was resected based on the results of video-ECoG (electrocorticograph) monitoring and electrical cortical stimulation.The patient has been seizure-free for 1 year since operation, and no neurological deficits have been observed.We discuss possible mechanisms of cortical reorganization in this patient and the features of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) IIb in eloquent cortices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Institute of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
We present the case of a patient with epilepsy arising from cortical dysplasia in his precentral gyrus. The lesion was resected based on the results of video-ECoG (electrocorticograph) monitoring and electrical cortical stimulation. The patient has been seizure-free for 1 year since operation, and no neurological deficits have been observed. We discuss possible mechanisms of cortical reorganization in this patient and the features of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) IIb in eloquent cortices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus