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Seizure freedom in epilepsia partialis continua (EPC) through vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy: A case report.

Shen Y, Xia F, Feng G, Liu L, Lin W, Liu Y, Shi M, Ren X, Ding B, Zhao G, Deng Y - Epilepsy Behav Case Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is generally considered as a palliative treatment for patients with drug-resistant partial-onset epilepsy.We report a case in which a patient with drug-resistant epilepsia partialis continua (EPC), became seizure-free for 15 months with VNS combined with antiepileptic medication regimens.To our knowledge, similar cases have not been reported previously.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China.

ABSTRACT
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is generally considered as a palliative treatment for patients with drug-resistant partial-onset epilepsy. We report a case in which a patient with drug-resistant epilepsia partialis continua (EPC), became seizure-free for 15 months with VNS combined with antiepileptic medication regimens. To our knowledge, similar cases have not been reported previously.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The signal of the cortex in the head of the right putamen has disappeared, the lenticular nucleus is somewhat small, and the right frontotemporal lobe and insular lobe show an abnormal signal, with suspected developmental delay.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f0005: The signal of the cortex in the head of the right putamen has disappeared, the lenticular nucleus is somewhat small, and the right frontotemporal lobe and insular lobe show an abnormal signal, with suspected developmental delay.

Mentions: A 21-year-old, right-handed man started having seizures at the age of 18. He reported countless limb shaking for about 10 s and occasional generalized tonic-clonic seizures at a frequency of 5–7 times per year. His seizures were commonly precipitated by stress, sleep deprivation, AED noncompliance, and changes in emotion, such as excitation and anger. He was initially treated with valproic acid (VPA) with minimal benefits. He was also treated with carbamazepine (CBZ), which provided better seizure control, but its effectiveness disappeared four months later. Then, he was treated with lamotrigine (LTG) at 200 mg daily, levetiracetam (LEV) at 1250 mg daily, and topiramate (TPM) at 200 mg daily with minimal benefits for the last several months. His general physical and neurological examinations were normal, and his family history was noncontributory. However, he suffered head trauma at the age of three, and his brain MRI revealed that the signal of the cortex in the head of the right putamen disappeared, and the lenticular nucleus was somewhat small, with suspected developmental delay (Fig. 1), and long-term video-EEG monitoring revealed small spike-wave discharges. Sometimes, he could not even say a word or have dinner due to mouth twitching, which also prevented him from working. He was referred by his neurologist to our epilepsy center for evaluation for possible VNS therapy.


Seizure freedom in epilepsia partialis continua (EPC) through vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy: A case report.

Shen Y, Xia F, Feng G, Liu L, Lin W, Liu Y, Shi M, Ren X, Ding B, Zhao G, Deng Y - Epilepsy Behav Case Rep (2013)

The signal of the cortex in the head of the right putamen has disappeared, the lenticular nucleus is somewhat small, and the right frontotemporal lobe and insular lobe show an abnormal signal, with suspected developmental delay.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150626&req=5

f0005: The signal of the cortex in the head of the right putamen has disappeared, the lenticular nucleus is somewhat small, and the right frontotemporal lobe and insular lobe show an abnormal signal, with suspected developmental delay.
Mentions: A 21-year-old, right-handed man started having seizures at the age of 18. He reported countless limb shaking for about 10 s and occasional generalized tonic-clonic seizures at a frequency of 5–7 times per year. His seizures were commonly precipitated by stress, sleep deprivation, AED noncompliance, and changes in emotion, such as excitation and anger. He was initially treated with valproic acid (VPA) with minimal benefits. He was also treated with carbamazepine (CBZ), which provided better seizure control, but its effectiveness disappeared four months later. Then, he was treated with lamotrigine (LTG) at 200 mg daily, levetiracetam (LEV) at 1250 mg daily, and topiramate (TPM) at 200 mg daily with minimal benefits for the last several months. His general physical and neurological examinations were normal, and his family history was noncontributory. However, he suffered head trauma at the age of three, and his brain MRI revealed that the signal of the cortex in the head of the right putamen disappeared, and the lenticular nucleus was somewhat small, with suspected developmental delay (Fig. 1), and long-term video-EEG monitoring revealed small spike-wave discharges. Sometimes, he could not even say a word or have dinner due to mouth twitching, which also prevented him from working. He was referred by his neurologist to our epilepsy center for evaluation for possible VNS therapy.

Bottom Line: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is generally considered as a palliative treatment for patients with drug-resistant partial-onset epilepsy.We report a case in which a patient with drug-resistant epilepsia partialis continua (EPC), became seizure-free for 15 months with VNS combined with antiepileptic medication regimens.To our knowledge, similar cases have not been reported previously.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China.

ABSTRACT
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is generally considered as a palliative treatment for patients with drug-resistant partial-onset epilepsy. We report a case in which a patient with drug-resistant epilepsia partialis continua (EPC), became seizure-free for 15 months with VNS combined with antiepileptic medication regimens. To our knowledge, similar cases have not been reported previously.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus