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Akinetopsia as epileptic seizure.

Sakurai K, Kurita T, Takeda Y, Shiraishi H, Kusumi I - Epilepsy Behav Case Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: This symptom was paroxysmal and recurrent.Both EEG and magnetoencephalography showed repetitive right temporal spikes.We diagnosed his visual symptom as akinetopsia, which was aroused by hyperexcitability of the right temporal and parietal cortices, including area MT/V5.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Akinetopsia is a rare syndrome in which a patient specifically loses the ability to perceive visual motion following bilateral cortical lesions outside the striate cortex. We describe a patient who showed akinetopsia recurrently as epileptic seizures. The patient was a 61-year-old man. At age 46, a cerebral arteriovenous malformation in the right parietal lobe was discovered. At age 58, he began to have a recurrent visual symptom by which smooth movements of objects suddenly appeared, resembling freeze frames in a motion picture. This symptom was paroxysmal and recurrent. Both EEG and magnetoencephalography showed repetitive right temporal spikes. We diagnosed his visual symptom as akinetopsia, which was aroused by hyperexcitability of the right temporal and parietal cortices, including area MT/V5. We administered carbamazepine 200 mg/day, which suppressed his akinetopsic symptom completely.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Magnetic resonance imaging (CISS). The lesion is visible in the right parietal lobe.
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f0005: Magnetic resonance imaging (CISS). The lesion is visible in the right parietal lobe.

Mentions: The patient was a 61-year-old right-handed Japanese man. His psychomotor development was normal. At age 46, a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the right parietal lobe was discovered. Although radiotherapy was performed to the AVM at our hospital, it did not result in the complete obstruction of the nidus. He had occasionally experienced visual hallucinations of flashes in the left visual field from the age of 47 years. Although this disappeared several years later, at age 58, he began to have another visual symptom by which smooth movements of objects suddenly appeared, resembling freeze frames in a motion picture. If the symptom occurred during a conversation, words were heard at normal speed, but the figure of the person halted, as in a freeze frame of a movie. Shape, size, color vision, and visual fields were normal. The symptom appeared in the entire visual field. This symptom appeared subsequent to being aware of a bad feeling and lasted for several seconds. When no object moved in the view during the symptom, it did not appear to freeze. However, the feeling that the whole view was shaking appeared. This symptom occurred several times per month. Although the patient underwent reexamination for AVM at our hospital, the nidus was obstructed completely. Because the symptom came to occur several times each day at age 59, he was referred to the Department of Neurosurgery at our hospital. The visual symptom was diagnosed as an epileptic seizure, and treatment with antiepileptic drugs was started. However, valproate and levetiracetam failed to control his seizures. At age 61, he was referred to our department. He said about his seizures, “Suddenly, I was feeling sick; then, I would go into the world like freeze frames several times a day.” His neurological examination was normal. Brain MRI revealed a high-intensity area suggestive of AVM in the right parietal lobe (Fig. 1). Scalp interictal EEG and magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed repetitive right temporal spikes (Fig. 2). Equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) calculated from these MEG spikes were clustered in the right mesial temporal lobe (Fig. 3). We diagnosed his visual symptom as akinetopsia, which was aroused by the hyperexcitability of the right temporal and parietal cortices, including area MT/V5. We administered carbamazepine 200 mg/day, which suppressed his akinetopsic symptom completely. The right temporal spikes on EEG had disappeared. He has continued CBZ and has been living since with no symptoms.


Akinetopsia as epileptic seizure.

Sakurai K, Kurita T, Takeda Y, Shiraishi H, Kusumi I - Epilepsy Behav Case Rep (2013)

Magnetic resonance imaging (CISS). The lesion is visible in the right parietal lobe.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150625&req=5

f0005: Magnetic resonance imaging (CISS). The lesion is visible in the right parietal lobe.
Mentions: The patient was a 61-year-old right-handed Japanese man. His psychomotor development was normal. At age 46, a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the right parietal lobe was discovered. Although radiotherapy was performed to the AVM at our hospital, it did not result in the complete obstruction of the nidus. He had occasionally experienced visual hallucinations of flashes in the left visual field from the age of 47 years. Although this disappeared several years later, at age 58, he began to have another visual symptom by which smooth movements of objects suddenly appeared, resembling freeze frames in a motion picture. If the symptom occurred during a conversation, words were heard at normal speed, but the figure of the person halted, as in a freeze frame of a movie. Shape, size, color vision, and visual fields were normal. The symptom appeared in the entire visual field. This symptom appeared subsequent to being aware of a bad feeling and lasted for several seconds. When no object moved in the view during the symptom, it did not appear to freeze. However, the feeling that the whole view was shaking appeared. This symptom occurred several times per month. Although the patient underwent reexamination for AVM at our hospital, the nidus was obstructed completely. Because the symptom came to occur several times each day at age 59, he was referred to the Department of Neurosurgery at our hospital. The visual symptom was diagnosed as an epileptic seizure, and treatment with antiepileptic drugs was started. However, valproate and levetiracetam failed to control his seizures. At age 61, he was referred to our department. He said about his seizures, “Suddenly, I was feeling sick; then, I would go into the world like freeze frames several times a day.” His neurological examination was normal. Brain MRI revealed a high-intensity area suggestive of AVM in the right parietal lobe (Fig. 1). Scalp interictal EEG and magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed repetitive right temporal spikes (Fig. 2). Equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) calculated from these MEG spikes were clustered in the right mesial temporal lobe (Fig. 3). We diagnosed his visual symptom as akinetopsia, which was aroused by the hyperexcitability of the right temporal and parietal cortices, including area MT/V5. We administered carbamazepine 200 mg/day, which suppressed his akinetopsic symptom completely. The right temporal spikes on EEG had disappeared. He has continued CBZ and has been living since with no symptoms.

Bottom Line: This symptom was paroxysmal and recurrent.Both EEG and magnetoencephalography showed repetitive right temporal spikes.We diagnosed his visual symptom as akinetopsia, which was aroused by hyperexcitability of the right temporal and parietal cortices, including area MT/V5.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Akinetopsia is a rare syndrome in which a patient specifically loses the ability to perceive visual motion following bilateral cortical lesions outside the striate cortex. We describe a patient who showed akinetopsia recurrently as epileptic seizures. The patient was a 61-year-old man. At age 46, a cerebral arteriovenous malformation in the right parietal lobe was discovered. At age 58, he began to have a recurrent visual symptom by which smooth movements of objects suddenly appeared, resembling freeze frames in a motion picture. This symptom was paroxysmal and recurrent. Both EEG and magnetoencephalography showed repetitive right temporal spikes. We diagnosed his visual symptom as akinetopsia, which was aroused by hyperexcitability of the right temporal and parietal cortices, including area MT/V5. We administered carbamazepine 200 mg/day, which suppressed his akinetopsic symptom completely.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus