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Surgical treatment of refractory epilepsy after chemotherapy in two children with leukemia.

Leng Y, Yu T, Li Y, Chen W - Epilepsy Behav Case Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: In these cases, the cause of the refractory seizures was identified as mesial temporal lobe sclerosis.Using presurgical evaluations and measures of the surgical outcomes, the lesions were identified as epileptogenic and were located in the mesial temporal lobe.The underlying pathophysiological background is discussed to aid in understanding this uncommon long-term complication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Hematology, Chaoyang Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Refractory epilepsy is a rare, long-term complication in children with acute leukemia who are receiving chemotherapy. A few studies have reported cases of several patients who developed recurrent complex partial seizures after the initiation of chemotherapy. In these cases, the cause of the refractory seizures was identified as mesial temporal lobe sclerosis. Here, we report on two patients with extratemporal lesions accompanied by refractory seizures, a long-term complication of acute lymphocytic leukemia. Using presurgical evaluations and measures of the surgical outcomes, the lesions were identified as epileptogenic and were located in the mesial temporal lobe. The underlying pathophysiological background is discussed to aid in understanding this uncommon long-term complication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Infiltrated lesions in the right parietal and left frontal lobes.
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f0015: Infiltrated lesions in the right parietal and left frontal lobes.

Mentions: A 3-year-old boy was admitted to the hospital with ALL (L1). He received DVLP (daunomycine, vincristine, l-asparaginase, prednisone) and achieved complete remission after one cycle of treatment. However, he developed recurrent seizures approximately one month after his final chemotherapy cycle. An MRI scan showed infiltrated lesions in his brain (Fig. 3). At that time, he received a chemotherapy protocol of VM26, Ara-c, HD-MTX, and VDLP. His seizures gradually decreased and finally disappeared with elimination of the lesions and effective chemotherapy without antiepileptic drugs. However, his seizures reoccurred and increased in frequency two years later. Sometimes the seizures occurred after an aura of abdominal discomfort. During the seizures, the patient had automatisms of his right hand and arm and then displayed tonic and clonic movements in his left face and left limbs. The seizures gradually failed to respond to antiepileptic drugs, including topiramate, carbamazepine, sodium valproate, and oxcarbazepine, over the following years. The frequency of his seizures ranged from 20 times/day to once a week.


Surgical treatment of refractory epilepsy after chemotherapy in two children with leukemia.

Leng Y, Yu T, Li Y, Chen W - Epilepsy Behav Case Rep (2013)

Infiltrated lesions in the right parietal and left frontal lobes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150597&req=5

f0015: Infiltrated lesions in the right parietal and left frontal lobes.
Mentions: A 3-year-old boy was admitted to the hospital with ALL (L1). He received DVLP (daunomycine, vincristine, l-asparaginase, prednisone) and achieved complete remission after one cycle of treatment. However, he developed recurrent seizures approximately one month after his final chemotherapy cycle. An MRI scan showed infiltrated lesions in his brain (Fig. 3). At that time, he received a chemotherapy protocol of VM26, Ara-c, HD-MTX, and VDLP. His seizures gradually decreased and finally disappeared with elimination of the lesions and effective chemotherapy without antiepileptic drugs. However, his seizures reoccurred and increased in frequency two years later. Sometimes the seizures occurred after an aura of abdominal discomfort. During the seizures, the patient had automatisms of his right hand and arm and then displayed tonic and clonic movements in his left face and left limbs. The seizures gradually failed to respond to antiepileptic drugs, including topiramate, carbamazepine, sodium valproate, and oxcarbazepine, over the following years. The frequency of his seizures ranged from 20 times/day to once a week.

Bottom Line: In these cases, the cause of the refractory seizures was identified as mesial temporal lobe sclerosis.Using presurgical evaluations and measures of the surgical outcomes, the lesions were identified as epileptogenic and were located in the mesial temporal lobe.The underlying pathophysiological background is discussed to aid in understanding this uncommon long-term complication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Hematology, Chaoyang Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Refractory epilepsy is a rare, long-term complication in children with acute leukemia who are receiving chemotherapy. A few studies have reported cases of several patients who developed recurrent complex partial seizures after the initiation of chemotherapy. In these cases, the cause of the refractory seizures was identified as mesial temporal lobe sclerosis. Here, we report on two patients with extratemporal lesions accompanied by refractory seizures, a long-term complication of acute lymphocytic leukemia. Using presurgical evaluations and measures of the surgical outcomes, the lesions were identified as epileptogenic and were located in the mesial temporal lobe. The underlying pathophysiological background is discussed to aid in understanding this uncommon long-term complication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus