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Familial prostatic calcification in childhood associated with cranial-bone thickening: Review of literature and report of three cases.

Rifat UN, Mohammed M - Arab J Urol (2011)

Bottom Line: To review the few published cases of prostatic calculi, a rare condition in children, and to report three further cases.Further cases from three families with children having prostatic calculi are reported here.Prostatic calculi in childhood are rare; the condition requires further study and clarification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Medical City Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To review the few published cases of prostatic calculi, a rare condition in children, and to report three further cases.

Methods: The databases PUBMED and HINARI were searched using the keywords 'childhood' and 'prostatic calculi'; the search included reports from 1956 to the present. Further cases from three families with children having prostatic calculi are reported here.

Results: Four cases were recorded previously but no association was stated between the presence of calculi and cranial-bone abnormality.

Conclusions: Prostatic calculi in childhood are rare; the condition requires further study and clarification.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A photograph of the brother, and his pelvic plain X-ray.
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f0015: A photograph of the brother, and his pelvic plain X-ray.

Mentions: The family was asked to bring his only brother, who was 7 years old (Fig. 3); he was asymptomatic but a plain film showed prostatic calcification. Both brothers were investigated, including IVU, a complete blood analysis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and measurements of blood urea, creatinine, calcium, phosphate, uric acid, parathyroid hormone, and alkaline phosphatase (Table 2). In addition 24-h urinary calcium, uric acid, cystine and oxalate were analysed. All these investigations showed no obvious abnormality. Cysto-urethroscopy showed no bladder or urethral pathology. Both brothers were followed. No specific treatment was prescribed.


Familial prostatic calcification in childhood associated with cranial-bone thickening: Review of literature and report of three cases.

Rifat UN, Mohammed M - Arab J Urol (2011)

A photograph of the brother, and his pelvic plain X-ray.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150583&req=5

f0015: A photograph of the brother, and his pelvic plain X-ray.
Mentions: The family was asked to bring his only brother, who was 7 years old (Fig. 3); he was asymptomatic but a plain film showed prostatic calcification. Both brothers were investigated, including IVU, a complete blood analysis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and measurements of blood urea, creatinine, calcium, phosphate, uric acid, parathyroid hormone, and alkaline phosphatase (Table 2). In addition 24-h urinary calcium, uric acid, cystine and oxalate were analysed. All these investigations showed no obvious abnormality. Cysto-urethroscopy showed no bladder or urethral pathology. Both brothers were followed. No specific treatment was prescribed.

Bottom Line: To review the few published cases of prostatic calculi, a rare condition in children, and to report three further cases.Further cases from three families with children having prostatic calculi are reported here.Prostatic calculi in childhood are rare; the condition requires further study and clarification.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Medical City Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To review the few published cases of prostatic calculi, a rare condition in children, and to report three further cases.

Methods: The databases PUBMED and HINARI were searched using the keywords 'childhood' and 'prostatic calculi'; the search included reports from 1956 to the present. Further cases from three families with children having prostatic calculi are reported here.

Results: Four cases were recorded previously but no association was stated between the presence of calculi and cranial-bone abnormality.

Conclusions: Prostatic calculi in childhood are rare; the condition requires further study and clarification.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus