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Effect of donor and recipient variables on the long-term live-donor renal allograft survival in children.

Wafa EW, Shokeir AA, Akl A, Hassan N, Fouda MA, El Dahshan K, Ghoneim MA - Arab J Urol (2011)

Bottom Line: The follow-up ranged from 6 months to 25 years.Only six patients (0.02%) were lost to follow-up.Considering these variables provides a better outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Urology and Nephrology Centre, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We aimed to analyse donor and recipient predictors of graft survival in children who received live-donor renal grafts.

Patients and methods: The study comprised 273 children who received live-donor renal transplants at our center between March 1976 and October 2010. The follow-up ranged from 6 months to 25 years. Donor variables included donor age, gender, donor/recipient body weight ratio (DR BWR), ABO blood groups, human leukocyte antigen, and DR mismatching. Donor-specific problems, e.g., ischemia time during surgery and number of renal arteries, were included. Recipient variables included recipient age, sex, original kidney disease, ischemia time, acute tubular necrosis (ATN) after transplantation, immunosuppression, number of acute rejection episodes, re-transplantation, and development of hypertension.

Results: Independent variables with a sustained effect on the 5- and 10-year graft survival on multivariate analysis were: ATN after transplant, number of acute rejections, hypertension, and DR BWR. At the last follow-up, 185 patients (67.8%) had a functioning graft, while 82 (30.0%) had graft failure. Only six patients (0.02%) were lost to follow-up.

Conclusion: Donor and recipient variables that affect short- and long-term graft survival in children with a live-donor renal allograft are DR BWR, number of acute rejections, ATN and hypertension after transplant. Considering these variables provides a better outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Actuarial patient and graft survival.
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f0005: Actuarial patient and graft survival.

Mentions: Graft and patient survival to the last follow-up are shown in Fig. 1; patient survival was 89.5% and 78.3% at 5 and 10 years, respectively, while graft survival was 82.8% and 60%, respectively. The effect of 11 donor variables on the 5- and 10-year survival rates were examined by univariate analysis (Table 1); only three variables gave significant results, i.e., the number of HLA-A and -B mismatching, the side of kidney donation and the DR BWR.


Effect of donor and recipient variables on the long-term live-donor renal allograft survival in children.

Wafa EW, Shokeir AA, Akl A, Hassan N, Fouda MA, El Dahshan K, Ghoneim MA - Arab J Urol (2011)

Actuarial patient and graft survival.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150562&req=5

f0005: Actuarial patient and graft survival.
Mentions: Graft and patient survival to the last follow-up are shown in Fig. 1; patient survival was 89.5% and 78.3% at 5 and 10 years, respectively, while graft survival was 82.8% and 60%, respectively. The effect of 11 donor variables on the 5- and 10-year survival rates were examined by univariate analysis (Table 1); only three variables gave significant results, i.e., the number of HLA-A and -B mismatching, the side of kidney donation and the DR BWR.

Bottom Line: The follow-up ranged from 6 months to 25 years.Only six patients (0.02%) were lost to follow-up.Considering these variables provides a better outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Urology and Nephrology Centre, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We aimed to analyse donor and recipient predictors of graft survival in children who received live-donor renal grafts.

Patients and methods: The study comprised 273 children who received live-donor renal transplants at our center between March 1976 and October 2010. The follow-up ranged from 6 months to 25 years. Donor variables included donor age, gender, donor/recipient body weight ratio (DR BWR), ABO blood groups, human leukocyte antigen, and DR mismatching. Donor-specific problems, e.g., ischemia time during surgery and number of renal arteries, were included. Recipient variables included recipient age, sex, original kidney disease, ischemia time, acute tubular necrosis (ATN) after transplantation, immunosuppression, number of acute rejection episodes, re-transplantation, and development of hypertension.

Results: Independent variables with a sustained effect on the 5- and 10-year graft survival on multivariate analysis were: ATN after transplant, number of acute rejections, hypertension, and DR BWR. At the last follow-up, 185 patients (67.8%) had a functioning graft, while 82 (30.0%) had graft failure. Only six patients (0.02%) were lost to follow-up.

Conclusion: Donor and recipient variables that affect short- and long-term graft survival in children with a live-donor renal allograft are DR BWR, number of acute rejections, ATN and hypertension after transplant. Considering these variables provides a better outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus