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Induced urinary crystal formation as an analytical strategy for the prediction and monitoring of urolithiasis and other metabolism-related disorders.

Laube N, Berg W, Bernsmann F, Gravius S, Klein F, Latz S, Mallek Dv, Porowski T, Randau T, Wasilewska A, Fisang C - EPMA J (2014)

Bottom Line: In case of urolithiasis, induced crystal formation in native urine has led to the development of the Bonn-Risk-Index (BRI), a valuable tool to quantify an individual's risk of calcium oxalate urolithiasis.If the progression of a disease is associated with characteristic changes in the activities of urinary components, this leads to an altered urinary crystallisation capacity.Since crystal formation inherently takes into account the entire urinary composition, the influence of the disease on individual urinary parameters does not have to be known in order to monitor the consequent pathologic alterations.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Deutsches Harnsteinzentrum, Urologisches Zentrum Bonn Friedensplatz, Friedensplatz 16, Bonn 53111, Germany ; NTTF Coatings GmbH, Maarweg 32, Rheinbreitbach 53619, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Crystal formation reflects the entire composition of the surrounding solution. In case of urolithiasis, induced crystal formation in native urine has led to the development of the Bonn-Risk-Index (BRI), a valuable tool to quantify an individual's risk of calcium oxalate urolithiasis. If the progression of a disease is associated with characteristic changes in the activities of urinary components, this leads to an altered urinary crystallisation capacity. Therefore, the results of induced urinary crystal formation can be used to detect and monitor any disease linked to the altered urinary composition. Since crystal formation inherently takes into account the entire urinary composition, the influence of the disease on individual urinary parameters does not have to be known in order to monitor the consequent pathologic alterations. In this paper, we review the background of urinary crystal formation analysis and describe its established application in urolithiasis monitoring as well as potential further fields of clinical application.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Urine composition reflects the individual interplay of all extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors as well as all metabolic processes including affected cell and organ functions. Depending on the medical condition, concentrations of particular urinary constituents can systematically change, and consequently, crystal formation processes are influenced. Therefore, the disease's urinary ‘signal’ can be detected by induced growth of a particular mineral phase. This relation can be used as a clinical ‘early-warning system’ if the differences in crystal formation risk and health state are analytically significant. The crystal formation risk can be detected by either continuous increase of urinary supersaturation (i.e. addition of an appropriate trigger substance) up to the moment of crystal formation (e.g.[44]) or incrementally using preset risk levels (i.e. discrete amounts of a trigger substance) that are exceeded if crystal formation takes place (e.g.[45]).
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Figure 6: Urine composition reflects the individual interplay of all extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors as well as all metabolic processes including affected cell and organ functions. Depending on the medical condition, concentrations of particular urinary constituents can systematically change, and consequently, crystal formation processes are influenced. Therefore, the disease's urinary ‘signal’ can be detected by induced growth of a particular mineral phase. This relation can be used as a clinical ‘early-warning system’ if the differences in crystal formation risk and health state are analytically significant. The crystal formation risk can be detected by either continuous increase of urinary supersaturation (i.e. addition of an appropriate trigger substance) up to the moment of crystal formation (e.g.[44]) or incrementally using preset risk levels (i.e. discrete amounts of a trigger substance) that are exceeded if crystal formation takes place (e.g.[45]).

Mentions: Crystal growth induced in native urine is a promising approach to quantify a disease's progression or a treatment's success. As urine composition reflects a person's metabolic state, medical conditions as well as medical treatments affecting at least one metabolic process can be detected by their specific urinary metabolic product (Figure 6). However, quantification of such a ‘biochemical signal’ by laboratory analysis, if known at all, can be expensive and time-consuming. In contrast, specifically induced formation of an appropriate mineral species from native urine skips the problem of unknown disease markers and reduces the analysis-related costs.


Induced urinary crystal formation as an analytical strategy for the prediction and monitoring of urolithiasis and other metabolism-related disorders.

Laube N, Berg W, Bernsmann F, Gravius S, Klein F, Latz S, Mallek Dv, Porowski T, Randau T, Wasilewska A, Fisang C - EPMA J (2014)

Urine composition reflects the individual interplay of all extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors as well as all metabolic processes including affected cell and organ functions. Depending on the medical condition, concentrations of particular urinary constituents can systematically change, and consequently, crystal formation processes are influenced. Therefore, the disease's urinary ‘signal’ can be detected by induced growth of a particular mineral phase. This relation can be used as a clinical ‘early-warning system’ if the differences in crystal formation risk and health state are analytically significant. The crystal formation risk can be detected by either continuous increase of urinary supersaturation (i.e. addition of an appropriate trigger substance) up to the moment of crystal formation (e.g.[44]) or incrementally using preset risk levels (i.e. discrete amounts of a trigger substance) that are exceeded if crystal formation takes place (e.g.[45]).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150547&req=5

Figure 6: Urine composition reflects the individual interplay of all extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors as well as all metabolic processes including affected cell and organ functions. Depending on the medical condition, concentrations of particular urinary constituents can systematically change, and consequently, crystal formation processes are influenced. Therefore, the disease's urinary ‘signal’ can be detected by induced growth of a particular mineral phase. This relation can be used as a clinical ‘early-warning system’ if the differences in crystal formation risk and health state are analytically significant. The crystal formation risk can be detected by either continuous increase of urinary supersaturation (i.e. addition of an appropriate trigger substance) up to the moment of crystal formation (e.g.[44]) or incrementally using preset risk levels (i.e. discrete amounts of a trigger substance) that are exceeded if crystal formation takes place (e.g.[45]).
Mentions: Crystal growth induced in native urine is a promising approach to quantify a disease's progression or a treatment's success. As urine composition reflects a person's metabolic state, medical conditions as well as medical treatments affecting at least one metabolic process can be detected by their specific urinary metabolic product (Figure 6). However, quantification of such a ‘biochemical signal’ by laboratory analysis, if known at all, can be expensive and time-consuming. In contrast, specifically induced formation of an appropriate mineral species from native urine skips the problem of unknown disease markers and reduces the analysis-related costs.

Bottom Line: In case of urolithiasis, induced crystal formation in native urine has led to the development of the Bonn-Risk-Index (BRI), a valuable tool to quantify an individual's risk of calcium oxalate urolithiasis.If the progression of a disease is associated with characteristic changes in the activities of urinary components, this leads to an altered urinary crystallisation capacity.Since crystal formation inherently takes into account the entire urinary composition, the influence of the disease on individual urinary parameters does not have to be known in order to monitor the consequent pathologic alterations.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Deutsches Harnsteinzentrum, Urologisches Zentrum Bonn Friedensplatz, Friedensplatz 16, Bonn 53111, Germany ; NTTF Coatings GmbH, Maarweg 32, Rheinbreitbach 53619, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Crystal formation reflects the entire composition of the surrounding solution. In case of urolithiasis, induced crystal formation in native urine has led to the development of the Bonn-Risk-Index (BRI), a valuable tool to quantify an individual's risk of calcium oxalate urolithiasis. If the progression of a disease is associated with characteristic changes in the activities of urinary components, this leads to an altered urinary crystallisation capacity. Therefore, the results of induced urinary crystal formation can be used to detect and monitor any disease linked to the altered urinary composition. Since crystal formation inherently takes into account the entire urinary composition, the influence of the disease on individual urinary parameters does not have to be known in order to monitor the consequent pathologic alterations. In this paper, we review the background of urinary crystal formation analysis and describe its established application in urolithiasis monitoring as well as potential further fields of clinical application.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus