Limits...
Prefrontal-posterior coupling while observing the suffering of other people, and the development of intrusive memories.

Reiser EM, Weiss EM, Schulter G, Holmes EA, Fink A, Papousek I - Psychophysiology (2014)

Bottom Line: The factors contributing to why some people develop intrusive memories and others do not are still poorly understood.Individuals showing greater decreases of functional coupling between prefrontal and posterior cortices (greater decreases of EEG beta coherences) reported more intrusive memories of the witnessed events.The findings illuminate brain mechanisms involved in the encoding of information in ways that make intrusive memories more likely.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Biological Psychology Unit, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Study design overview. Participants were exposed to a film containing several scenes that had been used in previous studies as an experimental analogue of psychological trauma. EEG was recorded during the last 5 min of the film and during the 2-min reference period preceding the film. Short-term impact in terms of intrusive images occurring during the 2 min following the film was assessed immediately afterwards. Medium-term impact was assessed over a period of 1 week with a daily pen and paper diary in which participants recorded intrusive images of the film and using the intrusion subscale of the Impact of Event Scale (IES-R), administered 1 week after the initial test session.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150534&req=5

fig01: Study design overview. Participants were exposed to a film containing several scenes that had been used in previous studies as an experimental analogue of psychological trauma. EEG was recorded during the last 5 min of the film and during the 2-min reference period preceding the film. Short-term impact in terms of intrusive images occurring during the 2 min following the film was assessed immediately afterwards. Medium-term impact was assessed over a period of 1 week with a daily pen and paper diary in which participants recorded intrusive images of the film and using the intrusion subscale of the Impact of Event Scale (IES-R), administered 1 week after the initial test session.

Mentions: After completing the handedness test and the CES-D, participants were seated in an acoustically and electrically shielded examination chamber, and electrodes were attached. Participants were then instructed that, after a short recording period during which they should watch the green circle on the screen (2 min), they would see a film to which they should direct their whole attention. They were asked to view the film as if they were really there, like a bystander at the scene of the events and to not close their eyes or look away. The film would be followed by another 2-min rest period. Subsequently, the short-term intrusion rating and the rating to what degree the film had affected the participant appeared on the screen, which the participants completed using the computer mouse. The technical equipment and the experimenter were located outside the EEG chamber. The participants were continuously monitored by a camera. Participants then were instructed to keep a daily diary for 1 week, in which they recorded their intrusions of the film scenes. On return to the laboratory 1 week after the EEG recording, participants delivered the diary and completed the IES-R intrusion scale.1 See Figure 1 for an overview of the study design.


Prefrontal-posterior coupling while observing the suffering of other people, and the development of intrusive memories.

Reiser EM, Weiss EM, Schulter G, Holmes EA, Fink A, Papousek I - Psychophysiology (2014)

Study design overview. Participants were exposed to a film containing several scenes that had been used in previous studies as an experimental analogue of psychological trauma. EEG was recorded during the last 5 min of the film and during the 2-min reference period preceding the film. Short-term impact in terms of intrusive images occurring during the 2 min following the film was assessed immediately afterwards. Medium-term impact was assessed over a period of 1 week with a daily pen and paper diary in which participants recorded intrusive images of the film and using the intrusion subscale of the Impact of Event Scale (IES-R), administered 1 week after the initial test session.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150534&req=5

fig01: Study design overview. Participants were exposed to a film containing several scenes that had been used in previous studies as an experimental analogue of psychological trauma. EEG was recorded during the last 5 min of the film and during the 2-min reference period preceding the film. Short-term impact in terms of intrusive images occurring during the 2 min following the film was assessed immediately afterwards. Medium-term impact was assessed over a period of 1 week with a daily pen and paper diary in which participants recorded intrusive images of the film and using the intrusion subscale of the Impact of Event Scale (IES-R), administered 1 week after the initial test session.
Mentions: After completing the handedness test and the CES-D, participants were seated in an acoustically and electrically shielded examination chamber, and electrodes were attached. Participants were then instructed that, after a short recording period during which they should watch the green circle on the screen (2 min), they would see a film to which they should direct their whole attention. They were asked to view the film as if they were really there, like a bystander at the scene of the events and to not close their eyes or look away. The film would be followed by another 2-min rest period. Subsequently, the short-term intrusion rating and the rating to what degree the film had affected the participant appeared on the screen, which the participants completed using the computer mouse. The technical equipment and the experimenter were located outside the EEG chamber. The participants were continuously monitored by a camera. Participants then were instructed to keep a daily diary for 1 week, in which they recorded their intrusions of the film scenes. On return to the laboratory 1 week after the EEG recording, participants delivered the diary and completed the IES-R intrusion scale.1 See Figure 1 for an overview of the study design.

Bottom Line: The factors contributing to why some people develop intrusive memories and others do not are still poorly understood.Individuals showing greater decreases of functional coupling between prefrontal and posterior cortices (greater decreases of EEG beta coherences) reported more intrusive memories of the witnessed events.The findings illuminate brain mechanisms involved in the encoding of information in ways that make intrusive memories more likely.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Biological Psychology Unit, University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus