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Does early intensive multifactorial therapy reduce modelled cardiovascular risk in individuals with screen-detected diabetes? Results from the ADDITION-Europe cluster randomized trial.

Black JA, Sharp SJ, Wareham NJ, Sandbaek A, Rutten GE, Lauritzen T, Khunti K, Davies MJ, Borch-Johnsen K, Griffin SJ, Simmons RK - Diabet. Med. (2014)

Bottom Line: In the absence of long-term data on hard outcomes, we described change in 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk in the 5 years following diagnosis, and quantified the impact of intensive treatment on 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk at 5 years.Compared with routine care, 10-year modelled cardiovascular disease risk was lower in the intensive treatment group at 5 years.Our results suggest that patients benefit from intensive treatment early in the diabetes disease trajectory, where the rate of cardiovascular disease risk progression may be slowed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge University Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, UK.

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Distribution of 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk at baseline and 5.7-year follow-up in the ADDITION-Europe trial cohort by treatment group.
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fig01: Distribution of 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk at baseline and 5.7-year follow-up in the ADDITION-Europe trial cohort by treatment group.

Mentions: Ten-year modelled cardiovascular disease risk was 27.3% (sd 13.9) at baseline in the ADDITION-Europe trial cohort and 21.3% (sd 13.8) at 5 years (Table 2). Across all four centres there was a decline in modelled risk from baseline to follow-up in both the routine care (–5.0%; sd 12.2) and intensive care group (–6.9%; sd 9.0). Figure 1 shows the distribution of cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and follow-up separately by treatment group. For both groups, the distribution of modelled cardiovascular disease risk shifted to the left. Declines in modelled risk from diagnosis to 5 years were correlated with decreases in lipid, glucose and blood pressure values (see Supporting Information, Fig. S2).


Does early intensive multifactorial therapy reduce modelled cardiovascular risk in individuals with screen-detected diabetes? Results from the ADDITION-Europe cluster randomized trial.

Black JA, Sharp SJ, Wareham NJ, Sandbaek A, Rutten GE, Lauritzen T, Khunti K, Davies MJ, Borch-Johnsen K, Griffin SJ, Simmons RK - Diabet. Med. (2014)

Distribution of 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk at baseline and 5.7-year follow-up in the ADDITION-Europe trial cohort by treatment group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150529&req=5

fig01: Distribution of 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk at baseline and 5.7-year follow-up in the ADDITION-Europe trial cohort by treatment group.
Mentions: Ten-year modelled cardiovascular disease risk was 27.3% (sd 13.9) at baseline in the ADDITION-Europe trial cohort and 21.3% (sd 13.8) at 5 years (Table 2). Across all four centres there was a decline in modelled risk from baseline to follow-up in both the routine care (–5.0%; sd 12.2) and intensive care group (–6.9%; sd 9.0). Figure 1 shows the distribution of cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and follow-up separately by treatment group. For both groups, the distribution of modelled cardiovascular disease risk shifted to the left. Declines in modelled risk from diagnosis to 5 years were correlated with decreases in lipid, glucose and blood pressure values (see Supporting Information, Fig. S2).

Bottom Line: In the absence of long-term data on hard outcomes, we described change in 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk in the 5 years following diagnosis, and quantified the impact of intensive treatment on 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk at 5 years.Compared with routine care, 10-year modelled cardiovascular disease risk was lower in the intensive treatment group at 5 years.Our results suggest that patients benefit from intensive treatment early in the diabetes disease trajectory, where the rate of cardiovascular disease risk progression may be slowed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge University Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus