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Early life socio-economic position and later alcohol use: birth cohort study.

Melotti R, Lewis G, Hickman M, Heron J, Araya R, Macleod J - Addiction (2012)

Bottom Line: Higher household income was associated with greater risk of alcohol use and problem use, most apparently among girls.Children from higher-income households in England appear to be at greater risk of some types of adolescent alcohol problems, and these risks appear different in girls compared to boys.Childhood social advantage may not generally be associated with healthier behaviour in adolescence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; Center for Biomedicine, EURAC, Bolzano, Italy.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Visual representation of the interaction of gender with indicators of socio-economic position for alcohol-related problems at age 15 years.(a) y-Axis: odds of alcohol psychosocial problems; x-axis: level of disposable income from lowest (left-hand side) to highest (right-hand side). (b) y-Axis: odds of alcohol behavioural problems; x-axis: maternal educational qualifications. Plain line: girls; dashed-dotted line: boys
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fig01: Visual representation of the interaction of gender with indicators of socio-economic position for alcohol-related problems at age 15 years.(a) y-Axis: odds of alcohol psychosocial problems; x-axis: level of disposable income from lowest (left-hand side) to highest (right-hand side). (b) y-Axis: odds of alcohol behavioural problems; x-axis: maternal educational qualifications. Plain line: girls; dashed-dotted line: boys

Mentions: There was some evidence of an interaction between gender and dimensions of SEP for measures of alcohol-related problems in adolescence (Table 4 and Fig. 1). Among girls, increasing household income was associated with increasing risk of alcohol-related psychosocial problems, whereas an opposite and weaker association was apparent among boys (Fig. 1a). For example, when stratifying the marginal effects by levels of income and gender, girls coming from the top quintile of household income had their average odds of alcohol psychosocial problems 1.7 [odds ratio (OR) 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.33–2.13] times higher than boys with comparable familial income. Conversely, among boys there was an average reduction of 0.029 (95% CI: 0.009–0.050) in the odds of alcohol-related behavioural problems for each additional level of maternal education, with no association apparent in girls (Fig. 1b). Fully adjusted and sensitivity analyses after multiple imputation showed similar patterns, although a few associations, particularly with social class and maternal education, were attenuated.


Early life socio-economic position and later alcohol use: birth cohort study.

Melotti R, Lewis G, Hickman M, Heron J, Araya R, Macleod J - Addiction (2012)

Visual representation of the interaction of gender with indicators of socio-economic position for alcohol-related problems at age 15 years.(a) y-Axis: odds of alcohol psychosocial problems; x-axis: level of disposable income from lowest (left-hand side) to highest (right-hand side). (b) y-Axis: odds of alcohol behavioural problems; x-axis: maternal educational qualifications. Plain line: girls; dashed-dotted line: boys
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150526&req=5

fig01: Visual representation of the interaction of gender with indicators of socio-economic position for alcohol-related problems at age 15 years.(a) y-Axis: odds of alcohol psychosocial problems; x-axis: level of disposable income from lowest (left-hand side) to highest (right-hand side). (b) y-Axis: odds of alcohol behavioural problems; x-axis: maternal educational qualifications. Plain line: girls; dashed-dotted line: boys
Mentions: There was some evidence of an interaction between gender and dimensions of SEP for measures of alcohol-related problems in adolescence (Table 4 and Fig. 1). Among girls, increasing household income was associated with increasing risk of alcohol-related psychosocial problems, whereas an opposite and weaker association was apparent among boys (Fig. 1a). For example, when stratifying the marginal effects by levels of income and gender, girls coming from the top quintile of household income had their average odds of alcohol psychosocial problems 1.7 [odds ratio (OR) 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.33–2.13] times higher than boys with comparable familial income. Conversely, among boys there was an average reduction of 0.029 (95% CI: 0.009–0.050) in the odds of alcohol-related behavioural problems for each additional level of maternal education, with no association apparent in girls (Fig. 1b). Fully adjusted and sensitivity analyses after multiple imputation showed similar patterns, although a few associations, particularly with social class and maternal education, were attenuated.

Bottom Line: Higher household income was associated with greater risk of alcohol use and problem use, most apparently among girls.Children from higher-income households in England appear to be at greater risk of some types of adolescent alcohol problems, and these risks appear different in girls compared to boys.Childhood social advantage may not generally be associated with healthier behaviour in adolescence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; Center for Biomedicine, EURAC, Bolzano, Italy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus