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Growing teratoma syndrome.

Scavuzzo A, Santana Ríos ZA, Noverón NR, Jimenez Ríos MA - Case Rep Urol (2014)

Bottom Line: Awareness of this syndrome is necessary in order to prevent unnecessary chemotherapy and allow optimal management.Prognosis is excellent after the excision of these tumors, but surgery has to be as complete as possible.Our experience in the surgical management of these lesions is reviewed in the following work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología (INCan), Avenida San Fernando 22, Colonia Seccion XVI, Tlalpan, 14080 Mexico City, DF, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
Growing teratoma syndrome (GTS) is a rare clinical entity, which presents with enlarging teratomas masses of the retroperitoneum or other locations, occurring during or after systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of nonseminomatous germ cell of the testis (NSGCT), with normalised tumour markers. Awareness of this syndrome is necessary in order to prevent unnecessary chemotherapy and allow optimal management. Prognosis is excellent after the excision of these tumors, but surgery has to be as complete as possible. Surgical resection of bulky GTS lesions is technically challenging; intraoperative complications may occur; that is, why the treatment must not be delayed. Our experience in the surgical management of these lesions is reviewed in the following work.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Mentions: After detection of unresectable tumor during postchemotherapy RPLND, 12 months after orchiectomy, the patient was referred to our hospital. A computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed a giant mass with a diameter of 21 cm which displaced the inferior vena cava, right kidney, and left psoas muscle. MRI examination was performed in order to characterize the mass better and its relationship to adjacent structures. MRI images showed no infiltration IVC (Figure 1). His α-fetoprotein was 2.1 ng/mL, lactate dehydrogenase was 122 IU/L, and beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin was 0 mIU/mL. The tumor was completely resected (Figure 2). Surgery was performed through transverse abdominal incision. Right nephrectomy was deemed necessary because no dissection plane remained between the residual tumor and the kidney. Operative time was 2,5 hours with no required transfusion. A fluid diet was started on the first postoperative day. Postoperative period was uneventful. He remained hospitalized for 3 days. Histologic find was teratoma mature. After a follow-up of 10 months, the patient is alive without recurrence.


Growing teratoma syndrome.

Scavuzzo A, Santana Ríos ZA, Noverón NR, Jimenez Ríos MA - Case Rep Urol (2014)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150507&req=5

Mentions: After detection of unresectable tumor during postchemotherapy RPLND, 12 months after orchiectomy, the patient was referred to our hospital. A computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed a giant mass with a diameter of 21 cm which displaced the inferior vena cava, right kidney, and left psoas muscle. MRI examination was performed in order to characterize the mass better and its relationship to adjacent structures. MRI images showed no infiltration IVC (Figure 1). His α-fetoprotein was 2.1 ng/mL, lactate dehydrogenase was 122 IU/L, and beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin was 0 mIU/mL. The tumor was completely resected (Figure 2). Surgery was performed through transverse abdominal incision. Right nephrectomy was deemed necessary because no dissection plane remained between the residual tumor and the kidney. Operative time was 2,5 hours with no required transfusion. A fluid diet was started on the first postoperative day. Postoperative period was uneventful. He remained hospitalized for 3 days. Histologic find was teratoma mature. After a follow-up of 10 months, the patient is alive without recurrence.

Bottom Line: Awareness of this syndrome is necessary in order to prevent unnecessary chemotherapy and allow optimal management.Prognosis is excellent after the excision of these tumors, but surgery has to be as complete as possible.Our experience in the surgical management of these lesions is reviewed in the following work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología (INCan), Avenida San Fernando 22, Colonia Seccion XVI, Tlalpan, 14080 Mexico City, DF, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
Growing teratoma syndrome (GTS) is a rare clinical entity, which presents with enlarging teratomas masses of the retroperitoneum or other locations, occurring during or after systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of nonseminomatous germ cell of the testis (NSGCT), with normalised tumour markers. Awareness of this syndrome is necessary in order to prevent unnecessary chemotherapy and allow optimal management. Prognosis is excellent after the excision of these tumors, but surgery has to be as complete as possible. Surgical resection of bulky GTS lesions is technically challenging; intraoperative complications may occur; that is, why the treatment must not be delayed. Our experience in the surgical management of these lesions is reviewed in the following work.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus