Limits...
Alepidea amatymbica Eckl. & Zeyh.: A Review of Its Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Toxicology.

Wintola OA, Afolayan AJ - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Bottom Line: All the phytochemical studies on Alepidea amatymbica obtained from the literature reported the presence of kaurene-type diterpenoids and their derivatives.Pharmacological areas identified on A. amatymbica fresh and dried extract include antibacterial, antifungal, sedative, astringent, antimalarial, anti-inflammatory, antihelminthes, antihypertensive, anti-HIV, and diuretic activities.Literature search on A. amatymbica revealed the use of cell line, brine shrimps, and rats for the determination of the toxicity in the plant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medicinal Plant and Economic Development Research Centre, Department of Botany, University of Fort Hare, Alice 5700, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Alepidea amatymbica is an important medicinal plant in Southern Africa with a long history of traditional use for the management of conditions like colds, coughs, sore throat, influenza, asthma, and abdominal cramps. Despite the much acclaimed traditional uses of the plant, there is a dearth of scientific information on the review of this plant. Hence, this review is aimed at providing information on the botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of A. amatymbica. This review uses all the synonyms of the plant obtained from the plant list. Google scholar, Science Direct, PubMed, and Scopus were made use of in addition to the University of Fort Hare's online databases. All the phytochemical studies on Alepidea amatymbica obtained from the literature reported the presence of kaurene-type diterpenoids and their derivatives. Pharmacological areas identified on A. amatymbica fresh and dried extract include antibacterial, antifungal, sedative, astringent, antimalarial, anti-inflammatory, antihelminthes, antihypertensive, anti-HIV, and diuretic activities. Literature search on A. amatymbica revealed the use of cell line, brine shrimps, and rats for the determination of the toxicity in the plant. Clinical trials and product development to fully exploit the medicinal value are also required to validate its folklore use in traditional medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Alepidea amatymbica Eckl. & Zeyh. in its natural habitat (source: http://www.Plantzafrica.com), (b) dried rhizome of Alepidea amatymbica, and ((c) and (d)) Alepidea amatymbica growing in the nursery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150506&req=5

fig1: (a) Alepidea amatymbica Eckl. & Zeyh. in its natural habitat (source: http://www.Plantzafrica.com), (b) dried rhizome of Alepidea amatymbica, and ((c) and (d)) Alepidea amatymbica growing in the nursery.

Mentions: Alepidea amatymbica Eckl. & Zeyh. also known as kalmoes (Afr.); Iqwili (Xhosa); ikhathazo (Zulu) is an important source of traditional medicine [10, 11]. The plant generally grows on stream banks, drainage lines, and forest margins of Northern and Southern Drakensberg Mountains of the Eastern Cape Province, Lesotho, Kwazulu Natal, Swaziland, Mpumalanga, and Northern Province extending towards Zimbabwe [12]. The plant is critically endangered in Zimbabwe [13, 14], vulnerable in Lesotho [15], and listed as at lower risk or near threatened but locally extinct in certain heavily collected areas [14, 16]. A. amatymbica is an herbaceous perennial plant with dark green leaves arising from a single or branched rhizome. It is a robust, erect plant, up to 2 m tall in grassland; the leaves form a loose rosette with the margins of the leaves prominently toothed, each tooth ending in a bristle. The flowering stalk hollow up to two meters in height, rising above the surrounding grasses, with numerous small flowers arranged in dense, rounded heads [8]. The inflorescence is widely branched, with a number of small, star-shaped white flowers about 250 mm in diameter (Figure 1). A. amatymbica has a number of synonyms, namely, Alepidea amatymbica var. amatymbica, Alepidea amatymbica var. cordata Eckl. & Zeyh., Alepidea aquatica Kuntze, and Eryngium amatymbica (Eckl. & Zeyh.) Koso-Pol [17].


Alepidea amatymbica Eckl. & Zeyh.: A Review of Its Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Toxicology.

Wintola OA, Afolayan AJ - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

(a) Alepidea amatymbica Eckl. & Zeyh. in its natural habitat (source: http://www.Plantzafrica.com), (b) dried rhizome of Alepidea amatymbica, and ((c) and (d)) Alepidea amatymbica growing in the nursery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150506&req=5

fig1: (a) Alepidea amatymbica Eckl. & Zeyh. in its natural habitat (source: http://www.Plantzafrica.com), (b) dried rhizome of Alepidea amatymbica, and ((c) and (d)) Alepidea amatymbica growing in the nursery.
Mentions: Alepidea amatymbica Eckl. & Zeyh. also known as kalmoes (Afr.); Iqwili (Xhosa); ikhathazo (Zulu) is an important source of traditional medicine [10, 11]. The plant generally grows on stream banks, drainage lines, and forest margins of Northern and Southern Drakensberg Mountains of the Eastern Cape Province, Lesotho, Kwazulu Natal, Swaziland, Mpumalanga, and Northern Province extending towards Zimbabwe [12]. The plant is critically endangered in Zimbabwe [13, 14], vulnerable in Lesotho [15], and listed as at lower risk or near threatened but locally extinct in certain heavily collected areas [14, 16]. A. amatymbica is an herbaceous perennial plant with dark green leaves arising from a single or branched rhizome. It is a robust, erect plant, up to 2 m tall in grassland; the leaves form a loose rosette with the margins of the leaves prominently toothed, each tooth ending in a bristle. The flowering stalk hollow up to two meters in height, rising above the surrounding grasses, with numerous small flowers arranged in dense, rounded heads [8]. The inflorescence is widely branched, with a number of small, star-shaped white flowers about 250 mm in diameter (Figure 1). A. amatymbica has a number of synonyms, namely, Alepidea amatymbica var. amatymbica, Alepidea amatymbica var. cordata Eckl. & Zeyh., Alepidea aquatica Kuntze, and Eryngium amatymbica (Eckl. & Zeyh.) Koso-Pol [17].

Bottom Line: All the phytochemical studies on Alepidea amatymbica obtained from the literature reported the presence of kaurene-type diterpenoids and their derivatives.Pharmacological areas identified on A. amatymbica fresh and dried extract include antibacterial, antifungal, sedative, astringent, antimalarial, anti-inflammatory, antihelminthes, antihypertensive, anti-HIV, and diuretic activities.Literature search on A. amatymbica revealed the use of cell line, brine shrimps, and rats for the determination of the toxicity in the plant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medicinal Plant and Economic Development Research Centre, Department of Botany, University of Fort Hare, Alice 5700, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Alepidea amatymbica is an important medicinal plant in Southern Africa with a long history of traditional use for the management of conditions like colds, coughs, sore throat, influenza, asthma, and abdominal cramps. Despite the much acclaimed traditional uses of the plant, there is a dearth of scientific information on the review of this plant. Hence, this review is aimed at providing information on the botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of A. amatymbica. This review uses all the synonyms of the plant obtained from the plant list. Google scholar, Science Direct, PubMed, and Scopus were made use of in addition to the University of Fort Hare's online databases. All the phytochemical studies on Alepidea amatymbica obtained from the literature reported the presence of kaurene-type diterpenoids and their derivatives. Pharmacological areas identified on A. amatymbica fresh and dried extract include antibacterial, antifungal, sedative, astringent, antimalarial, anti-inflammatory, antihelminthes, antihypertensive, anti-HIV, and diuretic activities. Literature search on A. amatymbica revealed the use of cell line, brine shrimps, and rats for the determination of the toxicity in the plant. Clinical trials and product development to fully exploit the medicinal value are also required to validate its folklore use in traditional medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus