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Ultrasound-mediated local drug and gene delivery using nanocarriers.

Zhou QL, Chen ZY, Wang YX, Yang F, Lin Y, Liao YY - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation) on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy.The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo), including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle.In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ultrasound Medicine, Laboratory of Ultrasound Molecular Imaging, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510150, China.

ABSTRACT
With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation) on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo), including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers.

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MR signal intensity before and after iLTSL injection and heating with MR-HIFU. Signal intensity: (a) before iLTSL injection and (b) after iLTSL injection. (c) Example of temperature map during heating, overlaid on signal intensity obtained with a treatment planning proton density weighted scan. (d) Signal intensity after four 10 min heating sessions. Note that (a), (b), and (d) represent T1-weighted images, and (c) shows a proton density weighted image [57].
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fig6: MR signal intensity before and after iLTSL injection and heating with MR-HIFU. Signal intensity: (a) before iLTSL injection and (b) after iLTSL injection. (c) Example of temperature map during heating, overlaid on signal intensity obtained with a treatment planning proton density weighted scan. (d) Signal intensity after four 10 min heating sessions. Note that (a), (b), and (d) represent T1-weighted images, and (c) shows a proton density weighted image [57].

Mentions: At melting phase-transition temperature, the lipid bilayer membrane changed from gel to the liquid crystalline phase, leading to release of encapsulated drugs from thermosensitive liposomes [65]. Temperature-triggered drug release from a temperature-sensitive liposome (iLTSLs) can promote drug delivery into the cytosol, which may due to the HIFU-induced sonoporation of the cell membrane [66]. MR-HIFU was clinically applied for the treatment of disease, such as uterine fibroids [67], hyperthermia treatments (40–45°C) [57], and hyperthermia-triggered drug delivery in a preclinical setting of rabbits [57, 68]. Based on iLTSLs, release with MR-HIFU was examined in tissue-mimicking phantoms containing iLTSL and in a VX2 rabbit tumor model [57]. In the studies, the in vitro DOX release kinetic of iLTSLs and temperature-induced DOX delivery under MR image-guidance using a clinical MR-HIFU system were studied in great detail [57, 32]. The release of content could be supervised by MRI. Preliminary study showed iLTSL injection could increase MR signal intensity, followed by further increases after each 10 min hyperthermia treatment (Figure 6), which was presumably due to contrast agent release from iLTSL. Thermosensitive liposomes were first used in tumors. Recently, thermosensitive liposomes have been used in other areas. US-mediated delivery using thermosensitive liposomes is helpful to improve the efficiency of drug delivery and has a good application prospect.


Ultrasound-mediated local drug and gene delivery using nanocarriers.

Zhou QL, Chen ZY, Wang YX, Yang F, Lin Y, Liao YY - Biomed Res Int (2014)

MR signal intensity before and after iLTSL injection and heating with MR-HIFU. Signal intensity: (a) before iLTSL injection and (b) after iLTSL injection. (c) Example of temperature map during heating, overlaid on signal intensity obtained with a treatment planning proton density weighted scan. (d) Signal intensity after four 10 min heating sessions. Note that (a), (b), and (d) represent T1-weighted images, and (c) shows a proton density weighted image [57].
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fig6: MR signal intensity before and after iLTSL injection and heating with MR-HIFU. Signal intensity: (a) before iLTSL injection and (b) after iLTSL injection. (c) Example of temperature map during heating, overlaid on signal intensity obtained with a treatment planning proton density weighted scan. (d) Signal intensity after four 10 min heating sessions. Note that (a), (b), and (d) represent T1-weighted images, and (c) shows a proton density weighted image [57].
Mentions: At melting phase-transition temperature, the lipid bilayer membrane changed from gel to the liquid crystalline phase, leading to release of encapsulated drugs from thermosensitive liposomes [65]. Temperature-triggered drug release from a temperature-sensitive liposome (iLTSLs) can promote drug delivery into the cytosol, which may due to the HIFU-induced sonoporation of the cell membrane [66]. MR-HIFU was clinically applied for the treatment of disease, such as uterine fibroids [67], hyperthermia treatments (40–45°C) [57], and hyperthermia-triggered drug delivery in a preclinical setting of rabbits [57, 68]. Based on iLTSLs, release with MR-HIFU was examined in tissue-mimicking phantoms containing iLTSL and in a VX2 rabbit tumor model [57]. In the studies, the in vitro DOX release kinetic of iLTSLs and temperature-induced DOX delivery under MR image-guidance using a clinical MR-HIFU system were studied in great detail [57, 32]. The release of content could be supervised by MRI. Preliminary study showed iLTSL injection could increase MR signal intensity, followed by further increases after each 10 min hyperthermia treatment (Figure 6), which was presumably due to contrast agent release from iLTSL. Thermosensitive liposomes were first used in tumors. Recently, thermosensitive liposomes have been used in other areas. US-mediated delivery using thermosensitive liposomes is helpful to improve the efficiency of drug delivery and has a good application prospect.

Bottom Line: These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation) on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy.The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo), including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle.In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ultrasound Medicine, Laboratory of Ultrasound Molecular Imaging, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510150, China.

ABSTRACT
With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation) on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo), including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus