Limits...
Effects of engineered nanomaterials on plants growth: an overview.

Aslani F, Bagheri S, Muhd Julkapli N, Juraimi AS, Hashemi FS, Baghdadi A - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Bottom Line: Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system.It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants.Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ratio and the growth of the seedlings. From the toxicological studies to date, certain types of engineered nanomaterials can be toxic once they are not bound to a substrate or if they are freely circulating in living systems. It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants. Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants. Therefore, this paper comprehensively reviews the studies on the different types of engineered nanomaterials and their interactions with different plant species, including the phytotoxicity, uptakes, and translocation of engineered nanomaterials by the plant at the whole plant and cellular level.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Scanning electron microscope images for NPs/lettuce seeds. In the aqueous phase, the SEM image shows that metal oxide NPs (TiO2 NPs 1000 mgL−1) (a) and (CuO NPs 1000 mgL−1) were adsorbed on the seed surface (b) [30].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150468&req=5

fig9: Scanning electron microscope images for NPs/lettuce seeds. In the aqueous phase, the SEM image shows that metal oxide NPs (TiO2 NPs 1000 mgL−1) (a) and (CuO NPs 1000 mgL−1) were adsorbed on the seed surface (b) [30].

Mentions: TiO2 nanoparticles show an increase in nitrate reeducates in Soybean (Glycine max), enhance the ability to absorb/use water, and stimulate the antioxidant system. For example, TiO2 nanoparticles treated seeds produced plants that had 73% more dry weight, three times higher photosynthetic rates, and 45% rise in chlorophyll a formation compared to the control over the germination period of 30 days [215]. The growth rate of spinach seeds, on the contrary, is proportional to the size of the materials, indicating that the smaller the nanomaterials, the better the germination. Some studies claimed that the TiO2 nanoparticles might have elevated the absorption of inorganic nutrients, accelerated the breakdown of organic substances, and caused quenching by oxygen free radicals formed during the photosynthetic process, consequently improving the photosynthetic rate [217, 218]. To increase seed germination rate, the key is the penetration of nanomaterials into the seed [30, 219, 220] (Figure 9). Meanwhile, TiO2, in the anatase phase, increases plant growth in spinach by improving nitrogen metabolism that promotes the adsorption of nitrate [30, 218, 219]. The same study indicated the negative effects of TiO2 nanoparticles towards the seed germination percentage and the number of roots for the species Oryza sativa L. This, in turn, accelerates the conversion of inorganic nitrogen into organic nitrogen, thus increasing the fresh and dry weight [221].


Effects of engineered nanomaterials on plants growth: an overview.

Aslani F, Bagheri S, Muhd Julkapli N, Juraimi AS, Hashemi FS, Baghdadi A - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Scanning electron microscope images for NPs/lettuce seeds. In the aqueous phase, the SEM image shows that metal oxide NPs (TiO2 NPs 1000 mgL−1) (a) and (CuO NPs 1000 mgL−1) were adsorbed on the seed surface (b) [30].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150468&req=5

fig9: Scanning electron microscope images for NPs/lettuce seeds. In the aqueous phase, the SEM image shows that metal oxide NPs (TiO2 NPs 1000 mgL−1) (a) and (CuO NPs 1000 mgL−1) were adsorbed on the seed surface (b) [30].
Mentions: TiO2 nanoparticles show an increase in nitrate reeducates in Soybean (Glycine max), enhance the ability to absorb/use water, and stimulate the antioxidant system. For example, TiO2 nanoparticles treated seeds produced plants that had 73% more dry weight, three times higher photosynthetic rates, and 45% rise in chlorophyll a formation compared to the control over the germination period of 30 days [215]. The growth rate of spinach seeds, on the contrary, is proportional to the size of the materials, indicating that the smaller the nanomaterials, the better the germination. Some studies claimed that the TiO2 nanoparticles might have elevated the absorption of inorganic nutrients, accelerated the breakdown of organic substances, and caused quenching by oxygen free radicals formed during the photosynthetic process, consequently improving the photosynthetic rate [217, 218]. To increase seed germination rate, the key is the penetration of nanomaterials into the seed [30, 219, 220] (Figure 9). Meanwhile, TiO2, in the anatase phase, increases plant growth in spinach by improving nitrogen metabolism that promotes the adsorption of nitrate [30, 218, 219]. The same study indicated the negative effects of TiO2 nanoparticles towards the seed germination percentage and the number of roots for the species Oryza sativa L. This, in turn, accelerates the conversion of inorganic nitrogen into organic nitrogen, thus increasing the fresh and dry weight [221].

Bottom Line: Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system.It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants.Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ratio and the growth of the seedlings. From the toxicological studies to date, certain types of engineered nanomaterials can be toxic once they are not bound to a substrate or if they are freely circulating in living systems. It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants. Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants. Therefore, this paper comprehensively reviews the studies on the different types of engineered nanomaterials and their interactions with different plant species, including the phytotoxicity, uptakes, and translocation of engineered nanomaterials by the plant at the whole plant and cellular level.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus