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Effects of engineered nanomaterials on plants growth: an overview.

Aslani F, Bagheri S, Muhd Julkapli N, Juraimi AS, Hashemi FS, Baghdadi A - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Bottom Line: Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system.It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants.Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ratio and the growth of the seedlings. From the toxicological studies to date, certain types of engineered nanomaterials can be toxic once they are not bound to a substrate or if they are freely circulating in living systems. It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants. Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants. Therefore, this paper comprehensively reviews the studies on the different types of engineered nanomaterials and their interactions with different plant species, including the phytotoxicity, uptakes, and translocation of engineered nanomaterials by the plant at the whole plant and cellular level.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Antifungal effect of Ag nanoparticles on culture filtrate and cell. Scanning electron microscopy images of hyphae of Alternaria alternata treated with silver, copper, or copper/silver nanoparticles. Fungal hyphae grown on potato dextrose agar plates as (a) control or supplemented with 15 mgL−1, (b) Ag, (c) Cu, or (d) Ag/Cu nanoparticle solution, respectively, Photos were taken at seven days after the incubation period [29].
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fig8: Antifungal effect of Ag nanoparticles on culture filtrate and cell. Scanning electron microscopy images of hyphae of Alternaria alternata treated with silver, copper, or copper/silver nanoparticles. Fungal hyphae grown on potato dextrose agar plates as (a) control or supplemented with 15 mgL−1, (b) Ag, (c) Cu, or (d) Ag/Cu nanoparticle solution, respectively, Photos were taken at seven days after the incubation period [29].

Mentions: Furthermore, Ag nanoparticles with sizes of approximately 40 nm have the potential to cause toxic effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae and Cucurbita pepo [160–164]. In the case of Cucurbita pepo, Ag nanoparticles induced 4.4 to 10 times more reductions in biomass and transpiration rates, rather than bulk sizes [29, 164–167]. Meanwhile, the limits of uptake and the distribution of Ag nanoparticles have been studied for Medicago sativa and Brassica juncea species [29, 168–177] (Figure 8).


Effects of engineered nanomaterials on plants growth: an overview.

Aslani F, Bagheri S, Muhd Julkapli N, Juraimi AS, Hashemi FS, Baghdadi A - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Antifungal effect of Ag nanoparticles on culture filtrate and cell. Scanning electron microscopy images of hyphae of Alternaria alternata treated with silver, copper, or copper/silver nanoparticles. Fungal hyphae grown on potato dextrose agar plates as (a) control or supplemented with 15 mgL−1, (b) Ag, (c) Cu, or (d) Ag/Cu nanoparticle solution, respectively, Photos were taken at seven days after the incubation period [29].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150468&req=5

fig8: Antifungal effect of Ag nanoparticles on culture filtrate and cell. Scanning electron microscopy images of hyphae of Alternaria alternata treated with silver, copper, or copper/silver nanoparticles. Fungal hyphae grown on potato dextrose agar plates as (a) control or supplemented with 15 mgL−1, (b) Ag, (c) Cu, or (d) Ag/Cu nanoparticle solution, respectively, Photos were taken at seven days after the incubation period [29].
Mentions: Furthermore, Ag nanoparticles with sizes of approximately 40 nm have the potential to cause toxic effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae and Cucurbita pepo [160–164]. In the case of Cucurbita pepo, Ag nanoparticles induced 4.4 to 10 times more reductions in biomass and transpiration rates, rather than bulk sizes [29, 164–167]. Meanwhile, the limits of uptake and the distribution of Ag nanoparticles have been studied for Medicago sativa and Brassica juncea species [29, 168–177] (Figure 8).

Bottom Line: Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system.It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants.Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ratio and the growth of the seedlings. From the toxicological studies to date, certain types of engineered nanomaterials can be toxic once they are not bound to a substrate or if they are freely circulating in living systems. It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants. Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants. Therefore, this paper comprehensively reviews the studies on the different types of engineered nanomaterials and their interactions with different plant species, including the phytotoxicity, uptakes, and translocation of engineered nanomaterials by the plant at the whole plant and cellular level.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus