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Oxidative stress and NO signalling in the root apex as an early response to changes in gravity conditions.

Mugnai S, Pandolfi C, Masi E, Azzarello E, Monetti E, Comparini D, Voigt B, Volkmann D, Mancuso S - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: The same results were obtained by ROS measurement.The detrimental effect of D'orenone, disrupting the polarised auxin transport, on the onset of the oxygen peaks during the microgravity period was also evaluated.Results indicates an active role of NO and ROS as messengers during the gravitropic response, with probable implications in the auxin redistribution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DISPAA, University of Florence, Viale delle Idee 30, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Italy ; HSO-USB, ESTEC, European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Oxygen influx showed an asymmetry in the transition zone of the root apex when roots were placed horizontally on ground. The influx increased only in the upper side, while no changes were detected in the division and in the elongation zone. Nitric oxide (NO) was also monitored after gravistimulation, revealing a sudden burst only in the transition zone. In order to confirm these results in real microgravity conditions, experiments have been set up by using parabolic flights and drop tower. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also monitored. Oxygen, NO, and ROS were continuously monitored during normal and hyper- and microgravity conditions in roots of maize seedlings. A distinct signal in oxygen and NO fluxes was clearly detected only in the apex zone during microgravity, with no significant changes in normal and in hypergravity conditions. The same results were obtained by ROS measurement. The detrimental effect of D'orenone, disrupting the polarised auxin transport, on the onset of the oxygen peaks during the microgravity period was also evaluated. Results indicates an active role of NO and ROS as messengers during the gravitropic response, with probable implications in the auxin redistribution.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

H2O2 production measured with Amplex Red during different gravity conditions. The letters I and II refer to the 1 g and 2 g phases prior (I) and after (II) the 0 g condition. Data are presented as average among each parabola of two parabolic flight days (62 parabolas in total are considered). Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Data statistically different are indicated with different letters (P < 0.05). Error bars are also indicated.
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fig11: H2O2 production measured with Amplex Red during different gravity conditions. The letters I and II refer to the 1 g and 2 g phases prior (I) and after (II) the 0 g condition. Data are presented as average among each parabola of two parabolic flight days (62 parabolas in total are considered). Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Data statistically different are indicated with different letters (P < 0.05). Error bars are also indicated.

Mentions: Production of H2O2 measured with Amplex Red is shown in Figure 11. Data were grouped according to the class of gravity level. Data recorded during microgravity (0 g) were statistically compared with data recorded during normogravity (1 g) and hypergravity (2 g) conditions. Transition from 1 g to 2 g and 2 g to 1 g had no significant effect on H2O2. On the contrary, transition from 2 g to 0 g results stimulated a higher H2O2 production from the root samples. Interestingly, we did not observe any difference in H2O2 production between 2 g condition in comparison to 1 g. Control experiment without any root tip inside the microplate showed no significant difference between all the gravity levels (data not shown).


Oxidative stress and NO signalling in the root apex as an early response to changes in gravity conditions.

Mugnai S, Pandolfi C, Masi E, Azzarello E, Monetti E, Comparini D, Voigt B, Volkmann D, Mancuso S - Biomed Res Int (2014)

H2O2 production measured with Amplex Red during different gravity conditions. The letters I and II refer to the 1 g and 2 g phases prior (I) and after (II) the 0 g condition. Data are presented as average among each parabola of two parabolic flight days (62 parabolas in total are considered). Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Data statistically different are indicated with different letters (P < 0.05). Error bars are also indicated.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150467&req=5

fig11: H2O2 production measured with Amplex Red during different gravity conditions. The letters I and II refer to the 1 g and 2 g phases prior (I) and after (II) the 0 g condition. Data are presented as average among each parabola of two parabolic flight days (62 parabolas in total are considered). Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Data statistically different are indicated with different letters (P < 0.05). Error bars are also indicated.
Mentions: Production of H2O2 measured with Amplex Red is shown in Figure 11. Data were grouped according to the class of gravity level. Data recorded during microgravity (0 g) were statistically compared with data recorded during normogravity (1 g) and hypergravity (2 g) conditions. Transition from 1 g to 2 g and 2 g to 1 g had no significant effect on H2O2. On the contrary, transition from 2 g to 0 g results stimulated a higher H2O2 production from the root samples. Interestingly, we did not observe any difference in H2O2 production between 2 g condition in comparison to 1 g. Control experiment without any root tip inside the microplate showed no significant difference between all the gravity levels (data not shown).

Bottom Line: The same results were obtained by ROS measurement.The detrimental effect of D'orenone, disrupting the polarised auxin transport, on the onset of the oxygen peaks during the microgravity period was also evaluated.Results indicates an active role of NO and ROS as messengers during the gravitropic response, with probable implications in the auxin redistribution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DISPAA, University of Florence, Viale delle Idee 30, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Italy ; HSO-USB, ESTEC, European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Oxygen influx showed an asymmetry in the transition zone of the root apex when roots were placed horizontally on ground. The influx increased only in the upper side, while no changes were detected in the division and in the elongation zone. Nitric oxide (NO) was also monitored after gravistimulation, revealing a sudden burst only in the transition zone. In order to confirm these results in real microgravity conditions, experiments have been set up by using parabolic flights and drop tower. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also monitored. Oxygen, NO, and ROS were continuously monitored during normal and hyper- and microgravity conditions in roots of maize seedlings. A distinct signal in oxygen and NO fluxes was clearly detected only in the apex zone during microgravity, with no significant changes in normal and in hypergravity conditions. The same results were obtained by ROS measurement. The detrimental effect of D'orenone, disrupting the polarised auxin transport, on the onset of the oxygen peaks during the microgravity period was also evaluated. Results indicates an active role of NO and ROS as messengers during the gravitropic response, with probable implications in the auxin redistribution.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus