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Hyperuricemia and incident cardiovascular disease and noncardiac vascular events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Kuo D, Crowson CS, Gabriel SE, Matteson EL - Int J Rheumatol (2014)

Bottom Line: A population-based inception cohort of patients diagnosed between 1980 and 2007 with adult-onset RA was assembled.A comparison cohort of age- and sex-matched subjects without RA (non-RA) was also assembled.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 1st Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objective. To evaluate whether hyperuricemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A population-based inception cohort of patients diagnosed between 1980 and 2007 with adult-onset RA was assembled. A comparison cohort of age- and sex-matched subjects without RA (non-RA) was also assembled. All clinically obtained uric acid values were collected. CVD and noncardiac vascular events were recorded for each patient. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the impact of hyperuricemia on development of CVD, mortality, and noncardiac vascular disease. Results. In patients without RA, hyperuricemia was associated with heart failure (HR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.13-3.39) and CVD (HR: 1.59; 95% CI: 0.99-2.55). In patients with RA, hyperuricemia was not significantly associated with CVD but was significantly associated with peripheral arterial events (HR: 2.52; 95% CI: 1.17-5.42). Hyperuricemia appeared to be more strongly associated with mortality among RA patients (HR: 1.96; 95% CI: 1.45-2.65) than among the non-RA subjects (HR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.09-2.24). Conclusion. In patients with RA, hyperuricemia was a significant predictor of peripheral arterial events and mortality but not of CVD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) versus subjects without RA (non-RA). The solid line is RA and dashed line is non-RA (P = 0.008). (b) Cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia in patients with RA (based on randomly selected uric acid tests using lower testing rate of the non-RA cohort) versus subjects without RA (non-RA). The solid line is RA and dashed line is non-RA (P = 0.64).
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fig2: (a) Cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) versus subjects without RA (non-RA). The solid line is RA and dashed line is non-RA (P = 0.008). (b) Cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia in patients with RA (based on randomly selected uric acid tests using lower testing rate of the non-RA cohort) versus subjects without RA (non-RA). The solid line is RA and dashed line is non-RA (P = 0.64).

Mentions: The cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia was higher in the RA patients compared to the non-RA subjects (18.1% ± 1.7% at 10 years in RA versus 11.5% ± 1.5% in non-RA; P = 0.008, Table 2; Figure 2(a)). However, after randomly resampling RA patient data to mimic the testing rate of non-RA subjects, the difference in cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia between groups disappeared (12.9% ± 1.5% at 10 years in RA versus 11.5% ± 1.5% in non-RA; P = 0.64, Table 2; Figure 2(b)). There was no difference in the rate of development of hyperuricemia among RA and non -RA by sex (P = 0.61 for RA/non-RA by male/female interaction).


Hyperuricemia and incident cardiovascular disease and noncardiac vascular events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Kuo D, Crowson CS, Gabriel SE, Matteson EL - Int J Rheumatol (2014)

(a) Cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) versus subjects without RA (non-RA). The solid line is RA and dashed line is non-RA (P = 0.008). (b) Cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia in patients with RA (based on randomly selected uric acid tests using lower testing rate of the non-RA cohort) versus subjects without RA (non-RA). The solid line is RA and dashed line is non-RA (P = 0.64).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150464&req=5

fig2: (a) Cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) versus subjects without RA (non-RA). The solid line is RA and dashed line is non-RA (P = 0.008). (b) Cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia in patients with RA (based on randomly selected uric acid tests using lower testing rate of the non-RA cohort) versus subjects without RA (non-RA). The solid line is RA and dashed line is non-RA (P = 0.64).
Mentions: The cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia was higher in the RA patients compared to the non-RA subjects (18.1% ± 1.7% at 10 years in RA versus 11.5% ± 1.5% in non-RA; P = 0.008, Table 2; Figure 2(a)). However, after randomly resampling RA patient data to mimic the testing rate of non-RA subjects, the difference in cumulative incidence of hyperuricemia between groups disappeared (12.9% ± 1.5% at 10 years in RA versus 11.5% ± 1.5% in non-RA; P = 0.64, Table 2; Figure 2(b)). There was no difference in the rate of development of hyperuricemia among RA and non -RA by sex (P = 0.61 for RA/non-RA by male/female interaction).

Bottom Line: A population-based inception cohort of patients diagnosed between 1980 and 2007 with adult-onset RA was assembled.A comparison cohort of age- and sex-matched subjects without RA (non-RA) was also assembled.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 1st Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objective. To evaluate whether hyperuricemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. A population-based inception cohort of patients diagnosed between 1980 and 2007 with adult-onset RA was assembled. A comparison cohort of age- and sex-matched subjects without RA (non-RA) was also assembled. All clinically obtained uric acid values were collected. CVD and noncardiac vascular events were recorded for each patient. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the impact of hyperuricemia on development of CVD, mortality, and noncardiac vascular disease. Results. In patients without RA, hyperuricemia was associated with heart failure (HR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.13-3.39) and CVD (HR: 1.59; 95% CI: 0.99-2.55). In patients with RA, hyperuricemia was not significantly associated with CVD but was significantly associated with peripheral arterial events (HR: 2.52; 95% CI: 1.17-5.42). Hyperuricemia appeared to be more strongly associated with mortality among RA patients (HR: 1.96; 95% CI: 1.45-2.65) than among the non-RA subjects (HR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.09-2.24). Conclusion. In patients with RA, hyperuricemia was a significant predictor of peripheral arterial events and mortality but not of CVD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus