Limits...
Bian zheng lun zhi as a complementary and alternative treatment for menstrual cramps in women with dysmenorrhea: a prospective clinical observation.

Lin PY, Tsai YT, Lai JN, Yeh CH, Fang RC - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Methods.Mixed model analysis revealed that TCM prescriptions were more effective in alleviating fatigue, hot flashes, dizziness, painful breasts, excitement, and irritability in the primary dysmenorrhea group (N = 36) than in the endometriosis group (N = 34).Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Section 2, Linong Road, Taipei City 112, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Background. Limited scientific evidence supports the positive effects of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for treating dysmenorrhea. Thus, an observation period of 3 months could verify the ancient indication that TCM treatments effectively alleviate menstrual cramps in women with primary dysmenorrhea or endometriosis. Methods. A prospective, nonrandomized study (primary dysmenorrhea and endometriosis groups) was conducted in women with dysmenorrhea for more than three consecutive menstrual cycles. All patients received TCM prescriptions based on bian zheng lun zhi theory 14 days before menstruation for a period of 12 weeks. Pain intensity was evaluated using a 10-cm visual analogue scale and two validated questionnaires (the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire and the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire). Results. Of the initial 70 intent-to-treat participants, the women with dysmenorrhea reported significant alleviation of cramps during menstruation after the 12-week TCM treatment. Mixed model analysis revealed that TCM prescriptions were more effective in alleviating fatigue, hot flashes, dizziness, painful breasts, excitement, and irritability in the primary dysmenorrhea group (N = 36) than in the endometriosis group (N = 34). Conclusion. TCM prescriptions based on syndrome differentiation theory might be a potentially viable choice for treating painful menstruation and premenstrual symptoms after ruling out endometriosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Numbers of participants in study stages.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150457&req=5

fig1: Numbers of participants in study stages.

Mentions: Of the 123 recruited participants, 53 were ineligible. The primary reasons for ineligibility were as follows: uninterested in participation after a detailed explanation (n = 6), irregular menstrual cycles (n = 5), medical conditions (n = 12), and loss to followup after the initial visit (n = 30). Overall, 53 (75.7%) of the initial 70 participants intending to treat completed the 12-week study (endometriosis, n = 28; primary dysmenorrhea, n = 25). Reasons for withdrawal were as follows: lack of efficacy (n = 1) and failure to return (n = 5) in the endometriosis group; protocol violation (n = 1), pregnancy (n = 2), and failure to return (n = 8) in the primary dysmenorrhea group (Figure 1).


Bian zheng lun zhi as a complementary and alternative treatment for menstrual cramps in women with dysmenorrhea: a prospective clinical observation.

Lin PY, Tsai YT, Lai JN, Yeh CH, Fang RC - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Numbers of participants in study stages.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150457&req=5

fig1: Numbers of participants in study stages.
Mentions: Of the 123 recruited participants, 53 were ineligible. The primary reasons for ineligibility were as follows: uninterested in participation after a detailed explanation (n = 6), irregular menstrual cycles (n = 5), medical conditions (n = 12), and loss to followup after the initial visit (n = 30). Overall, 53 (75.7%) of the initial 70 participants intending to treat completed the 12-week study (endometriosis, n = 28; primary dysmenorrhea, n = 25). Reasons for withdrawal were as follows: lack of efficacy (n = 1) and failure to return (n = 5) in the endometriosis group; protocol violation (n = 1), pregnancy (n = 2), and failure to return (n = 8) in the primary dysmenorrhea group (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Methods.Mixed model analysis revealed that TCM prescriptions were more effective in alleviating fatigue, hot flashes, dizziness, painful breasts, excitement, and irritability in the primary dysmenorrhea group (N = 36) than in the endometriosis group (N = 34).Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Section 2, Linong Road, Taipei City 112, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Background. Limited scientific evidence supports the positive effects of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for treating dysmenorrhea. Thus, an observation period of 3 months could verify the ancient indication that TCM treatments effectively alleviate menstrual cramps in women with primary dysmenorrhea or endometriosis. Methods. A prospective, nonrandomized study (primary dysmenorrhea and endometriosis groups) was conducted in women with dysmenorrhea for more than three consecutive menstrual cycles. All patients received TCM prescriptions based on bian zheng lun zhi theory 14 days before menstruation for a period of 12 weeks. Pain intensity was evaluated using a 10-cm visual analogue scale and two validated questionnaires (the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire and the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire). Results. Of the initial 70 intent-to-treat participants, the women with dysmenorrhea reported significant alleviation of cramps during menstruation after the 12-week TCM treatment. Mixed model analysis revealed that TCM prescriptions were more effective in alleviating fatigue, hot flashes, dizziness, painful breasts, excitement, and irritability in the primary dysmenorrhea group (N = 36) than in the endometriosis group (N = 34). Conclusion. TCM prescriptions based on syndrome differentiation theory might be a potentially viable choice for treating painful menstruation and premenstrual symptoms after ruling out endometriosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus