Limits...
Intrasurgical imaging of subinternal limiting membrane blood diffusion in terson syndrome.

Iuliano L, Fogliato G, Codenotti M - Case Rep Ophthalmol Med (2014)

Bottom Line: We report a case of Terson syndrome, providing the first intrasurgical imaging of subinternal limiting membrane blood diffusion in Terson syndrome.We highlight some remarkable in vivo anatomical findings that may give a contribution to the debate about its pathogenesis.Here we hypothesize that the subretinal space might be unlikely to be a primary source of intraocular hemorrhage, and we support the two generally accepted theories about blood diffusion from the retinal vasculature or from the perivascular spaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute University, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy.

ABSTRACT
We report a case of Terson syndrome, providing the first intrasurgical imaging of subinternal limiting membrane blood diffusion in Terson syndrome. We highlight some remarkable in vivo anatomical findings that may give a contribution to the debate about its pathogenesis. Here we hypothesize that the subretinal space might be unlikely to be a primary source of intraocular hemorrhage, and we support the two generally accepted theories about blood diffusion from the retinal vasculature or from the perivascular spaces.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Intact clot after posterior hyaloid peeling; (b) internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling; (c) gentle suction of sub-ILM hemorrhagic-fibrinoid material; (d) retinal aspect after hemorrhage evacuation; (e) Brilliant Blue staining of the remnant ILM; (f) bleaching of the retinal tissue (white arrows) after enlargement of ILM peeling out of hemorrhage region edges.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150455&req=5

fig1: (a) Intact clot after posterior hyaloid peeling; (b) internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling; (c) gentle suction of sub-ILM hemorrhagic-fibrinoid material; (d) retinal aspect after hemorrhage evacuation; (e) Brilliant Blue staining of the remnant ILM; (f) bleaching of the retinal tissue (white arrows) after enlargement of ILM peeling out of hemorrhage region edges.

Mentions: The digital video of the whole surgery procedure was carefully reviewed. Posterior hyaloid peeling left the clot intact (Figure 1(a)). Partial removal of the clot was obtained with ILM peeling, which allowed the blood to flow out into the vitreous cavity (Figure 1(b)). Gentle suction provided total evacuation of sub-ILM hemorrhagic-fibrinoid material (Figure 1(c)). Brilliant Blue (Geuder AG, Heidelberg, Germany) assisted ILM peeling enlargement out of the edges of the ILM-peeled hemorrhage area showed marked bleaching of the surrounding retinal tissue (Figure 1(f), white arrows), indicating absence of blood beneath the retinal tissue uninvolved by hemorrhage.


Intrasurgical imaging of subinternal limiting membrane blood diffusion in terson syndrome.

Iuliano L, Fogliato G, Codenotti M - Case Rep Ophthalmol Med (2014)

(a) Intact clot after posterior hyaloid peeling; (b) internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling; (c) gentle suction of sub-ILM hemorrhagic-fibrinoid material; (d) retinal aspect after hemorrhage evacuation; (e) Brilliant Blue staining of the remnant ILM; (f) bleaching of the retinal tissue (white arrows) after enlargement of ILM peeling out of hemorrhage region edges.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150455&req=5

fig1: (a) Intact clot after posterior hyaloid peeling; (b) internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling; (c) gentle suction of sub-ILM hemorrhagic-fibrinoid material; (d) retinal aspect after hemorrhage evacuation; (e) Brilliant Blue staining of the remnant ILM; (f) bleaching of the retinal tissue (white arrows) after enlargement of ILM peeling out of hemorrhage region edges.
Mentions: The digital video of the whole surgery procedure was carefully reviewed. Posterior hyaloid peeling left the clot intact (Figure 1(a)). Partial removal of the clot was obtained with ILM peeling, which allowed the blood to flow out into the vitreous cavity (Figure 1(b)). Gentle suction provided total evacuation of sub-ILM hemorrhagic-fibrinoid material (Figure 1(c)). Brilliant Blue (Geuder AG, Heidelberg, Germany) assisted ILM peeling enlargement out of the edges of the ILM-peeled hemorrhage area showed marked bleaching of the surrounding retinal tissue (Figure 1(f), white arrows), indicating absence of blood beneath the retinal tissue uninvolved by hemorrhage.

Bottom Line: We report a case of Terson syndrome, providing the first intrasurgical imaging of subinternal limiting membrane blood diffusion in Terson syndrome.We highlight some remarkable in vivo anatomical findings that may give a contribution to the debate about its pathogenesis.Here we hypothesize that the subretinal space might be unlikely to be a primary source of intraocular hemorrhage, and we support the two generally accepted theories about blood diffusion from the retinal vasculature or from the perivascular spaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute University, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy.

ABSTRACT
We report a case of Terson syndrome, providing the first intrasurgical imaging of subinternal limiting membrane blood diffusion in Terson syndrome. We highlight some remarkable in vivo anatomical findings that may give a contribution to the debate about its pathogenesis. Here we hypothesize that the subretinal space might be unlikely to be a primary source of intraocular hemorrhage, and we support the two generally accepted theories about blood diffusion from the retinal vasculature or from the perivascular spaces.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus