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Fatty Acid-Derived Biofuels and Chemicals Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Zhou YJ, Buijs NA, Siewers V, Nielsen J - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2014)

Bottom Line: From an engineering perspective, the pathway for fatty acid biosynthesis is an attractive route for the production of advanced fuels such as fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and alkanes.The robustness and excellent accessibility to molecular genetics make the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae a suitable host for the purpose of bio-manufacturing.Recent advances in metabolic engineering, as well as systems and synthetic biology, have now provided the opportunity to engineer yeast metabolism for the production of fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology , Gothenburg , Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Volatile energy costs and environmental concerns have spurred interest in the development of alternative, renewable, sustainable, and cost-effective energy resources. Environment-friendly processes involving microbes can be used to synthesize advanced biofuels. These fuels have the potential to replace fossil fuels in supporting high-power demanding machinery such as aircrafts and trucks. From an engineering perspective, the pathway for fatty acid biosynthesis is an attractive route for the production of advanced fuels such as fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and alkanes. The robustness and excellent accessibility to molecular genetics make the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae a suitable host for the purpose of bio-manufacturing. Recent advances in metabolic engineering, as well as systems and synthetic biology, have now provided the opportunity to engineer yeast metabolism for the production of fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Metabolic pathways for fatty acid-derived biofuel and chemical biosynthesis are shown. Acc1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase; FAS, fatty acid synthase; Pox1, acyl-CoA oxidase; Faa1-4 and Fat1, acyl-CoA synthetase; TES, thioesterase; ACR, fatty acyl-CoA reductase for fatty aldehyde synthesis; FaCoAR, fatty acyl-CoA reductase for fatty alcohol production; CAR, carboxylic acid reductase; FAR, fatty acid reductase; WS, wax ester synthase; ADO, aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase; ADH, alcohol dehydrogenase. The blue marked enzymes responsible for the endogenous fatty acid metabolism, while the green ones transform fatty acids and intermediates to different biofuels and oleo-chemicals.
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Figure 2: Metabolic pathways for fatty acid-derived biofuel and chemical biosynthesis are shown. Acc1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase; FAS, fatty acid synthase; Pox1, acyl-CoA oxidase; Faa1-4 and Fat1, acyl-CoA synthetase; TES, thioesterase; ACR, fatty acyl-CoA reductase for fatty aldehyde synthesis; FaCoAR, fatty acyl-CoA reductase for fatty alcohol production; CAR, carboxylic acid reductase; FAR, fatty acid reductase; WS, wax ester synthase; ADO, aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase; ADH, alcohol dehydrogenase. The blue marked enzymes responsible for the endogenous fatty acid metabolism, while the green ones transform fatty acids and intermediates to different biofuels and oleo-chemicals.

Mentions: Fatty acid metabolism has also been widely tailored for producing fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), fatty alcohols, and alkanes/alkenes with different chain length in prokaryotes, especially in E. coli, which has been reviewed elsewhere (Lennen and Pfleger, 2013; Janssen and Steinbuchel, 2014). Figure 2 illustrates how the different fatty acid-derived products can be obtained in yeast and is described in greater detail within the subsequent sections.


Fatty Acid-Derived Biofuels and Chemicals Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Zhou YJ, Buijs NA, Siewers V, Nielsen J - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2014)

Metabolic pathways for fatty acid-derived biofuel and chemical biosynthesis are shown. Acc1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase; FAS, fatty acid synthase; Pox1, acyl-CoA oxidase; Faa1-4 and Fat1, acyl-CoA synthetase; TES, thioesterase; ACR, fatty acyl-CoA reductase for fatty aldehyde synthesis; FaCoAR, fatty acyl-CoA reductase for fatty alcohol production; CAR, carboxylic acid reductase; FAR, fatty acid reductase; WS, wax ester synthase; ADO, aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase; ADH, alcohol dehydrogenase. The blue marked enzymes responsible for the endogenous fatty acid metabolism, while the green ones transform fatty acids and intermediates to different biofuels and oleo-chemicals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150446&req=5

Figure 2: Metabolic pathways for fatty acid-derived biofuel and chemical biosynthesis are shown. Acc1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase; FAS, fatty acid synthase; Pox1, acyl-CoA oxidase; Faa1-4 and Fat1, acyl-CoA synthetase; TES, thioesterase; ACR, fatty acyl-CoA reductase for fatty aldehyde synthesis; FaCoAR, fatty acyl-CoA reductase for fatty alcohol production; CAR, carboxylic acid reductase; FAR, fatty acid reductase; WS, wax ester synthase; ADO, aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase; ADH, alcohol dehydrogenase. The blue marked enzymes responsible for the endogenous fatty acid metabolism, while the green ones transform fatty acids and intermediates to different biofuels and oleo-chemicals.
Mentions: Fatty acid metabolism has also been widely tailored for producing fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), fatty alcohols, and alkanes/alkenes with different chain length in prokaryotes, especially in E. coli, which has been reviewed elsewhere (Lennen and Pfleger, 2013; Janssen and Steinbuchel, 2014). Figure 2 illustrates how the different fatty acid-derived products can be obtained in yeast and is described in greater detail within the subsequent sections.

Bottom Line: From an engineering perspective, the pathway for fatty acid biosynthesis is an attractive route for the production of advanced fuels such as fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and alkanes.The robustness and excellent accessibility to molecular genetics make the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae a suitable host for the purpose of bio-manufacturing.Recent advances in metabolic engineering, as well as systems and synthetic biology, have now provided the opportunity to engineer yeast metabolism for the production of fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology , Gothenburg , Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Volatile energy costs and environmental concerns have spurred interest in the development of alternative, renewable, sustainable, and cost-effective energy resources. Environment-friendly processes involving microbes can be used to synthesize advanced biofuels. These fuels have the potential to replace fossil fuels in supporting high-power demanding machinery such as aircrafts and trucks. From an engineering perspective, the pathway for fatty acid biosynthesis is an attractive route for the production of advanced fuels such as fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and alkanes. The robustness and excellent accessibility to molecular genetics make the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae a suitable host for the purpose of bio-manufacturing. Recent advances in metabolic engineering, as well as systems and synthetic biology, have now provided the opportunity to engineer yeast metabolism for the production of fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus