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CNS Involvement in AML Patient Treated with 5-Azacytidine.

Vasilatou D, Papageorgiou S, Bazani E, Prasouli A, Economopoulou C, Roumpakis C, Karakitsos P, Dimitriadis G, Pappa V - Case Rep Hematol (2014)

Bottom Line: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare complication of the disease and is associated with poor prognosis.Sometimes the clinical presentation can be unspecific and the diagnosis can be very challenging.Here we report a case of CNS infiltration in a patient suffering from AML who presented with normal complete blood count and altered mental status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Second Department of Internal Medicine and Research Institute, Athens University Medical School, Attikon University General Hospital, 1 Rimini Street, 12462 Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT
Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare complication of the disease and is associated with poor prognosis. Sometimes the clinical presentation can be unspecific and the diagnosis can be very challenging. Here we report a case of CNS infiltration in a patient suffering from AML who presented with normal complete blood count and altered mental status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) CSF was infiltrated by immature blood cells with characteristics of monoblasts. (b) The same cells were detected in the bone marrow, confirming the diagnosis of AML relapse in bone marrow and CNS.
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fig2: (a) CSF was infiltrated by immature blood cells with characteristics of monoblasts. (b) The same cells were detected in the bone marrow, confirming the diagnosis of AML relapse in bone marrow and CNS.

Mentions: Waiting for the cytology cultures of the CSF and considering the severity of the patients' clinical condition he was treated with antibiotic, antiviral, and antituberculosis drugs due to the suspicion of infectious meningitis, without improvement. 24 hours later, the cytology test revealed presence of blast cells in the CSF, establishing the diagnosis of CNS infiltration (Figure 2(a)). Bone marrow aspiration confirmed the disease relapse (Figure 2(b)). However, no blasts were isolated from the peripheral blood. The PCR-TB and CSF cultures were completed a few days later and were negative.


CNS Involvement in AML Patient Treated with 5-Azacytidine.

Vasilatou D, Papageorgiou S, Bazani E, Prasouli A, Economopoulou C, Roumpakis C, Karakitsos P, Dimitriadis G, Pappa V - Case Rep Hematol (2014)

(a) CSF was infiltrated by immature blood cells with characteristics of monoblasts. (b) The same cells were detected in the bone marrow, confirming the diagnosis of AML relapse in bone marrow and CNS.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150438&req=5

fig2: (a) CSF was infiltrated by immature blood cells with characteristics of monoblasts. (b) The same cells were detected in the bone marrow, confirming the diagnosis of AML relapse in bone marrow and CNS.
Mentions: Waiting for the cytology cultures of the CSF and considering the severity of the patients' clinical condition he was treated with antibiotic, antiviral, and antituberculosis drugs due to the suspicion of infectious meningitis, without improvement. 24 hours later, the cytology test revealed presence of blast cells in the CSF, establishing the diagnosis of CNS infiltration (Figure 2(a)). Bone marrow aspiration confirmed the disease relapse (Figure 2(b)). However, no blasts were isolated from the peripheral blood. The PCR-TB and CSF cultures were completed a few days later and were negative.

Bottom Line: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare complication of the disease and is associated with poor prognosis.Sometimes the clinical presentation can be unspecific and the diagnosis can be very challenging.Here we report a case of CNS infiltration in a patient suffering from AML who presented with normal complete blood count and altered mental status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Second Department of Internal Medicine and Research Institute, Athens University Medical School, Attikon University General Hospital, 1 Rimini Street, 12462 Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT
Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare complication of the disease and is associated with poor prognosis. Sometimes the clinical presentation can be unspecific and the diagnosis can be very challenging. Here we report a case of CNS infiltration in a patient suffering from AML who presented with normal complete blood count and altered mental status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus