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Acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation of systematic lupus erythematosus.

Jia Y, Ortiz A, Mccallum R, Salameh H, Serrato P - Case Rep Gastrointest Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease, including the gastrointestinal system in about half of SLE patients.As a rare complication of SLE, acute pancreatitis presents as generalized flare-ups in most cases of patients previously diagnosed with SLE.Here we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation with later diagnosis of SLE.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 4800 Alberta Avenue, El Paso, TX 79905, USA.

ABSTRACT
Systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease, including the gastrointestinal system in about half of SLE patients. As a rare complication of SLE, acute pancreatitis presents as generalized flare-ups in most cases of patients previously diagnosed with SLE. Here we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation with later diagnosis of SLE.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kidney biopsy of the patient indicated class III lupus nephritis. Less than 50 percent of glomeruli are affected by light microscopy. The glomerulonephritis is almost segmental.
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fig3: Kidney biopsy of the patient indicated class III lupus nephritis. Less than 50 percent of glomeruli are affected by light microscopy. The glomerulonephritis is almost segmental.

Mentions: New laboratory test results indicated erythrocyte sedimentation rate 52 mm/h, positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) 1 : 2516, positive anti-Double Stranded (DS) DNA Antibody 1 : 320, rheumatoid factor <10 units/mL, IgG4 150 mg/dL, protein S 29 mg/dL, Von Willebrand factor ristocetin cofactor 372 units/dL, C3 18 mg/dL, C4 < 1.5 mg/dL, lipase 1784 units/L, amylase 302 units/L, and fecal occult blood test positive. Normal Fibrogen level, normal prothrombin time, normal international normalized ratio and partial thromboplastin time, normal hepatitis panel and normal liver enzyme panel. Based on clinical and laboratory criteria, the diagnosis of SLE with possible lupus nephritis and mesenteric vasculitis was made and the patient was treated with methylprednisolone, levofloxacin, metronidazole, bactrim, cyclophosphamide, and mesna. Within days of treatment, patient had clinical improvement and was discharged home with tapering dosage of prednisone. One month after discharge, patient had kidney biopsy (Figure 3), which indicated class III lupus nephritis. On follow-up with nephrology, the patient's renal function was found to be preserved with a urine analysis showing 0–3RBC, no protein, and no casts. Proteinuria improved to less than 300 mg in 24 hours.


Acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation of systematic lupus erythematosus.

Jia Y, Ortiz A, Mccallum R, Salameh H, Serrato P - Case Rep Gastrointest Med (2014)

Kidney biopsy of the patient indicated class III lupus nephritis. Less than 50 percent of glomeruli are affected by light microscopy. The glomerulonephritis is almost segmental.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150433&req=5

fig3: Kidney biopsy of the patient indicated class III lupus nephritis. Less than 50 percent of glomeruli are affected by light microscopy. The glomerulonephritis is almost segmental.
Mentions: New laboratory test results indicated erythrocyte sedimentation rate 52 mm/h, positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) 1 : 2516, positive anti-Double Stranded (DS) DNA Antibody 1 : 320, rheumatoid factor <10 units/mL, IgG4 150 mg/dL, protein S 29 mg/dL, Von Willebrand factor ristocetin cofactor 372 units/dL, C3 18 mg/dL, C4 < 1.5 mg/dL, lipase 1784 units/L, amylase 302 units/L, and fecal occult blood test positive. Normal Fibrogen level, normal prothrombin time, normal international normalized ratio and partial thromboplastin time, normal hepatitis panel and normal liver enzyme panel. Based on clinical and laboratory criteria, the diagnosis of SLE with possible lupus nephritis and mesenteric vasculitis was made and the patient was treated with methylprednisolone, levofloxacin, metronidazole, bactrim, cyclophosphamide, and mesna. Within days of treatment, patient had clinical improvement and was discharged home with tapering dosage of prednisone. One month after discharge, patient had kidney biopsy (Figure 3), which indicated class III lupus nephritis. On follow-up with nephrology, the patient's renal function was found to be preserved with a urine analysis showing 0–3RBC, no protein, and no casts. Proteinuria improved to less than 300 mg in 24 hours.

Bottom Line: Systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease, including the gastrointestinal system in about half of SLE patients.As a rare complication of SLE, acute pancreatitis presents as generalized flare-ups in most cases of patients previously diagnosed with SLE.Here we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation with later diagnosis of SLE.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 4800 Alberta Avenue, El Paso, TX 79905, USA.

ABSTRACT
Systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disease, including the gastrointestinal system in about half of SLE patients. As a rare complication of SLE, acute pancreatitis presents as generalized flare-ups in most cases of patients previously diagnosed with SLE. Here we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis as the initial presentation with later diagnosis of SLE.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus