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Examining the relationship between face processing and social interaction behavior in children with and without autism spectrum disorder.

Corbett BA, Newsom C, Key AP, Qualls LR, Edmiston EK - J Neurodev Disord (2014)

Bottom Line: However, the extent to which neuropsychological measures are associated with or predictive of real-world social behavior is unclear.Autism symptomology only predicted verbal exchange with peers.Impairment in facial memory is associated with reduced 'real-world' social interaction and more self-play, whereas higher performance in face memory predicts more cooperative play.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University, PMB 40, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203, USA ; Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, PMB 40, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203, USA ; Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, PMB 40, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show impairment in reciprocal social communication, which includes deficits in social cognition and behavior. Since social cognition and social behavior are considered to be interdependent, it is valuable to examine social processes on multiple levels of analysis. Neuropsychological measures of face processing often reveal deficits in social cognition in ASD including the ability to identify and remember facial information. However, the extent to which neuropsychological measures are associated with or predictive of real-world social behavior is unclear.

Methods: The study investigated 66 children (ASD 34, typically developing (TD) 32) using neuropsychological measures of face processing (identity, affect, and memory). Children also participated in a peer interaction paradigm, which allowed observation and coding of natural social interaction behaviors during play with peers (e.g., Self-Play, Cooperative Play, Verbal Bout). ANCOVA, regression, and correlation models analyzed between-group differences, the ability of neuropsychological measures to predict social behavior, and the strength of the associations.

Results: Between-group differences were shown on Memory for Faces Delayed and the peer interaction variables Self-Play and Verbal Bout. Regression models indicated that Memory for Faces Delayed predicted the amount of Self-Play, Equipment use alone, and Cooperative Play with peers on the playground. Autism symptomology only predicted verbal exchange with peers.

Conclusions: Face memory strongly predicts relevant social engagement patterns in both children with and without ASD. Impairment in facial memory is associated with reduced 'real-world' social interaction and more self-play, whereas higher performance in face memory predicts more cooperative play. Results highlight the strong connection between face memory and reciprocal social interaction, suggesting that improvement in one may benefit the other.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Image of the Playground Paradigm with four camera views (numbers 1 to 4). The study took place on a 130 by 120 ft fenced-in playground containing large equipment, swings, walkways and open space for interactive games. Research personnel remained in the building while monitoring the protocol from within the behavioral lab, allowing the participants to engage in more natural play behavior. Interactions were recorded using video and audio equipment.
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Figure 1: Image of the Playground Paradigm with four camera views (numbers 1 to 4). The study took place on a 130 by 120 ft fenced-in playground containing large equipment, swings, walkways and open space for interactive games. Research personnel remained in the building while monitoring the protocol from within the behavioral lab, allowing the participants to engage in more natural play behavior. Interactions were recorded using video and audio equipment.

Mentions: The Peer Interaction Paradigm was developed to examine social exchanges within a playground environment occurring between children with and without autism[5]. The 20-min paradigm incorporates periods of free play and opportunities for cooperative play that are facilitated by a typically developing confederate child of the same age and gender. The 130 by 120 ft fenced-in playground is attached to a Vanderbilt University preschool and contains large equipment, swings, walkways, and open space for interactive games. For the duration of the protocol, adult research personnel remained in the building while monitoring ongoing activity from within the behavioral lab, allowing the participants to engage in more natural play behavior.Interactions were video recorded using four professional 70 Sony PTZ (New York, NY, USA) remotely operated cameras housed in glass cases and affixed to the four corners of the external fence of the playground (see Figure 1). The cameras contain pan, tilt, and zoom features allowing full capture of the playground. Remote audio communication was established by Sennheiser body pack (Old Lyme, CT, USA) and Audio-Technica transmitters and receivers (Stow, OH, USA), which functioned as battery-operated microphones that were clipped to the shirt of each child and simultaneously recorded by an eight-channel mixing board.


Examining the relationship between face processing and social interaction behavior in children with and without autism spectrum disorder.

Corbett BA, Newsom C, Key AP, Qualls LR, Edmiston EK - J Neurodev Disord (2014)

Image of the Playground Paradigm with four camera views (numbers 1 to 4). The study took place on a 130 by 120 ft fenced-in playground containing large equipment, swings, walkways and open space for interactive games. Research personnel remained in the building while monitoring the protocol from within the behavioral lab, allowing the participants to engage in more natural play behavior. Interactions were recorded using video and audio equipment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150424&req=5

Figure 1: Image of the Playground Paradigm with four camera views (numbers 1 to 4). The study took place on a 130 by 120 ft fenced-in playground containing large equipment, swings, walkways and open space for interactive games. Research personnel remained in the building while monitoring the protocol from within the behavioral lab, allowing the participants to engage in more natural play behavior. Interactions were recorded using video and audio equipment.
Mentions: The Peer Interaction Paradigm was developed to examine social exchanges within a playground environment occurring between children with and without autism[5]. The 20-min paradigm incorporates periods of free play and opportunities for cooperative play that are facilitated by a typically developing confederate child of the same age and gender. The 130 by 120 ft fenced-in playground is attached to a Vanderbilt University preschool and contains large equipment, swings, walkways, and open space for interactive games. For the duration of the protocol, adult research personnel remained in the building while monitoring ongoing activity from within the behavioral lab, allowing the participants to engage in more natural play behavior.Interactions were video recorded using four professional 70 Sony PTZ (New York, NY, USA) remotely operated cameras housed in glass cases and affixed to the four corners of the external fence of the playground (see Figure 1). The cameras contain pan, tilt, and zoom features allowing full capture of the playground. Remote audio communication was established by Sennheiser body pack (Old Lyme, CT, USA) and Audio-Technica transmitters and receivers (Stow, OH, USA), which functioned as battery-operated microphones that were clipped to the shirt of each child and simultaneously recorded by an eight-channel mixing board.

Bottom Line: However, the extent to which neuropsychological measures are associated with or predictive of real-world social behavior is unclear.Autism symptomology only predicted verbal exchange with peers.Impairment in facial memory is associated with reduced 'real-world' social interaction and more self-play, whereas higher performance in face memory predicts more cooperative play.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University, PMB 40, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203, USA ; Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, PMB 40, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203, USA ; Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, PMB 40, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show impairment in reciprocal social communication, which includes deficits in social cognition and behavior. Since social cognition and social behavior are considered to be interdependent, it is valuable to examine social processes on multiple levels of analysis. Neuropsychological measures of face processing often reveal deficits in social cognition in ASD including the ability to identify and remember facial information. However, the extent to which neuropsychological measures are associated with or predictive of real-world social behavior is unclear.

Methods: The study investigated 66 children (ASD 34, typically developing (TD) 32) using neuropsychological measures of face processing (identity, affect, and memory). Children also participated in a peer interaction paradigm, which allowed observation and coding of natural social interaction behaviors during play with peers (e.g., Self-Play, Cooperative Play, Verbal Bout). ANCOVA, regression, and correlation models analyzed between-group differences, the ability of neuropsychological measures to predict social behavior, and the strength of the associations.

Results: Between-group differences were shown on Memory for Faces Delayed and the peer interaction variables Self-Play and Verbal Bout. Regression models indicated that Memory for Faces Delayed predicted the amount of Self-Play, Equipment use alone, and Cooperative Play with peers on the playground. Autism symptomology only predicted verbal exchange with peers.

Conclusions: Face memory strongly predicts relevant social engagement patterns in both children with and without ASD. Impairment in facial memory is associated with reduced 'real-world' social interaction and more self-play, whereas higher performance in face memory predicts more cooperative play. Results highlight the strong connection between face memory and reciprocal social interaction, suggesting that improvement in one may benefit the other.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus