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Systematic analysis of the association between gut flora and obesity through high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics approaches.

Chiu CM, Huang WC, Weng SL, Tseng HC, Liang C, Wang WC, Yang T, Yang TL, Weng CT, Chang TH, Huang HD - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) demonstrated that normal samples were clustered more compactly than case samples.An unsupervised analysis demonstrated that bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: N-like and OB-like groups.Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P  value = 1.61E - 07).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Eighty-one stool samples from Taiwanese were collected for analysis of the association between the gut flora and obesity. The supervised analysis showed that the most, abundant genera of bacteria in normal samples (from people with a body mass index (BMI) ≤ 24) were Bacteroides (27.7%), Prevotella (19.4%), Escherichia (12%), Phascolarctobacterium (3.9%), and Eubacterium (3.5%). The most abundant genera of bacteria in case samples (with a BMI ≥ 27) were Bacteroides (29%), Prevotella (21%), Escherichia (7.4%), Megamonas (5.1%), and Phascolarctobacterium (3.8%). A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) demonstrated that normal samples were clustered more compactly than case samples. An unsupervised analysis demonstrated that bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: N-like and OB-like groups. Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P  value = 1.61E - 07). The results showed that bacterial communities in the gut were highly associated with obesity. This is the first study in Taiwan to investigate the association between human gut flora and obesity, and the results provide new insights into the correlation of bacteria with the rising trend in obesity.

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Unweighted (a) alpha diversity and (b) beta diversity of bacterial communities in the N-like and OB-like groups.
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fig4: Unweighted (a) alpha diversity and (b) beta diversity of bacterial communities in the N-like and OB-like groups.

Mentions: Hierarchical clustering was performed using the UniFrac unweighted distance, and gut bacterial communities and clinical values of each sample are shown in Figure 2. The results demonstrate that the bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: an N-like group (including the N1 and N2 subgroups) and an OB-like group (including the OB1, OB2, OB3, and OB4 subgroups). Figure 3 shows that the most abundant genera in N-like samples were Bacteroides (27.8%), Prevotella (18.6%), Escherichia (12.7%), Phascolarctobacterium (4%), and Eubacterium (3.5%). The most abundant genera in OB-like samples were Bacteroides (28.8%), Prevotella (21.7%), Escherichia (7.1%), Megamonas (4.4%), and Phascolarctobacterium (3.7%). Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P value = 1.61E − 07). The results showed that gut bacterial community types were highly associated with obesity. The genera diversity analysis showed that the bacterial communities in the N-like group exhibited significantly higher alpha diversity and lower beta diversity than those in the OB-like group (Figure 4).


Systematic analysis of the association between gut flora and obesity through high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics approaches.

Chiu CM, Huang WC, Weng SL, Tseng HC, Liang C, Wang WC, Yang T, Yang TL, Weng CT, Chang TH, Huang HD - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Unweighted (a) alpha diversity and (b) beta diversity of bacterial communities in the N-like and OB-like groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150407&req=5

fig4: Unweighted (a) alpha diversity and (b) beta diversity of bacterial communities in the N-like and OB-like groups.
Mentions: Hierarchical clustering was performed using the UniFrac unweighted distance, and gut bacterial communities and clinical values of each sample are shown in Figure 2. The results demonstrate that the bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: an N-like group (including the N1 and N2 subgroups) and an OB-like group (including the OB1, OB2, OB3, and OB4 subgroups). Figure 3 shows that the most abundant genera in N-like samples were Bacteroides (27.8%), Prevotella (18.6%), Escherichia (12.7%), Phascolarctobacterium (4%), and Eubacterium (3.5%). The most abundant genera in OB-like samples were Bacteroides (28.8%), Prevotella (21.7%), Escherichia (7.1%), Megamonas (4.4%), and Phascolarctobacterium (3.7%). Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P value = 1.61E − 07). The results showed that gut bacterial community types were highly associated with obesity. The genera diversity analysis showed that the bacterial communities in the N-like group exhibited significantly higher alpha diversity and lower beta diversity than those in the OB-like group (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) demonstrated that normal samples were clustered more compactly than case samples.An unsupervised analysis demonstrated that bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: N-like and OB-like groups.Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P  value = 1.61E - 07).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Eighty-one stool samples from Taiwanese were collected for analysis of the association between the gut flora and obesity. The supervised analysis showed that the most, abundant genera of bacteria in normal samples (from people with a body mass index (BMI) ≤ 24) were Bacteroides (27.7%), Prevotella (19.4%), Escherichia (12%), Phascolarctobacterium (3.9%), and Eubacterium (3.5%). The most abundant genera of bacteria in case samples (with a BMI ≥ 27) were Bacteroides (29%), Prevotella (21%), Escherichia (7.4%), Megamonas (5.1%), and Phascolarctobacterium (3.8%). A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) demonstrated that normal samples were clustered more compactly than case samples. An unsupervised analysis demonstrated that bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: N-like and OB-like groups. Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P  value = 1.61E - 07). The results showed that bacterial communities in the gut were highly associated with obesity. This is the first study in Taiwan to investigate the association between human gut flora and obesity, and the results provide new insights into the correlation of bacteria with the rising trend in obesity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus