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Systematic analysis of the association between gut flora and obesity through high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics approaches.

Chiu CM, Huang WC, Weng SL, Tseng HC, Liang C, Wang WC, Yang T, Yang TL, Weng CT, Chang TH, Huang HD - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) demonstrated that normal samples were clustered more compactly than case samples.An unsupervised analysis demonstrated that bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: N-like and OB-like groups.Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P  value = 1.61E - 07).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Eighty-one stool samples from Taiwanese were collected for analysis of the association between the gut flora and obesity. The supervised analysis showed that the most, abundant genera of bacteria in normal samples (from people with a body mass index (BMI) ≤ 24) were Bacteroides (27.7%), Prevotella (19.4%), Escherichia (12%), Phascolarctobacterium (3.9%), and Eubacterium (3.5%). The most abundant genera of bacteria in case samples (with a BMI ≥ 27) were Bacteroides (29%), Prevotella (21%), Escherichia (7.4%), Megamonas (5.1%), and Phascolarctobacterium (3.8%). A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) demonstrated that normal samples were clustered more compactly than case samples. An unsupervised analysis demonstrated that bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: N-like and OB-like groups. Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P  value = 1.61E - 07). The results showed that bacterial communities in the gut were highly associated with obesity. This is the first study in Taiwan to investigate the association between human gut flora and obesity, and the results provide new insights into the correlation of bacteria with the rising trend in obesity.

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The distribution of genera among all samples.
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fig1: The distribution of genera among all samples.

Mentions: Participant metadata are summarized in Table 1, and detailed sample profiles are given in Table S1 available online in Supplementary material at http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/906168, including the number of reads, gender, age, height, weight, and BMI. In total, 4,152,740 sequence reads were obtained from the 81 samples, and a mean of 51,268 reads with a median read length of 125 bp was obtained per study participant. Sequence reads were processed through our taxonomic mapping process, and the distribution of genera in samples is depicted in Figure 1. The sequencing results showed that the most abundant genera in all samples were Bacteroides (28%), Prevotella (20%), Escherichia (9.7%), Phascolarctobacterium (3.9%), Eubacterium (3.2%), Megamonas (3%), Faecalibacterium (2.9%), Gemmiger (2.2%), and Sutterella (2%).


Systematic analysis of the association between gut flora and obesity through high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics approaches.

Chiu CM, Huang WC, Weng SL, Tseng HC, Liang C, Wang WC, Yang T, Yang TL, Weng CT, Chang TH, Huang HD - Biomed Res Int (2014)

The distribution of genera among all samples.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150407&req=5

fig1: The distribution of genera among all samples.
Mentions: Participant metadata are summarized in Table 1, and detailed sample profiles are given in Table S1 available online in Supplementary material at http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/906168, including the number of reads, gender, age, height, weight, and BMI. In total, 4,152,740 sequence reads were obtained from the 81 samples, and a mean of 51,268 reads with a median read length of 125 bp was obtained per study participant. Sequence reads were processed through our taxonomic mapping process, and the distribution of genera in samples is depicted in Figure 1. The sequencing results showed that the most abundant genera in all samples were Bacteroides (28%), Prevotella (20%), Escherichia (9.7%), Phascolarctobacterium (3.9%), Eubacterium (3.2%), Megamonas (3%), Faecalibacterium (2.9%), Gemmiger (2.2%), and Sutterella (2%).

Bottom Line: A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) demonstrated that normal samples were clustered more compactly than case samples.An unsupervised analysis demonstrated that bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: N-like and OB-like groups.Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P  value = 1.61E - 07).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Eighty-one stool samples from Taiwanese were collected for analysis of the association between the gut flora and obesity. The supervised analysis showed that the most, abundant genera of bacteria in normal samples (from people with a body mass index (BMI) ≤ 24) were Bacteroides (27.7%), Prevotella (19.4%), Escherichia (12%), Phascolarctobacterium (3.9%), and Eubacterium (3.5%). The most abundant genera of bacteria in case samples (with a BMI ≥ 27) were Bacteroides (29%), Prevotella (21%), Escherichia (7.4%), Megamonas (5.1%), and Phascolarctobacterium (3.8%). A principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) demonstrated that normal samples were clustered more compactly than case samples. An unsupervised analysis demonstrated that bacterial communities in the gut were clustered into two main groups: N-like and OB-like groups. Remarkably, most normal samples (78%) were clustered in the N-like group, and most case samples (81%) were clustered in the OB-like group (Fisher's P  value = 1.61E - 07). The results showed that bacterial communities in the gut were highly associated with obesity. This is the first study in Taiwan to investigate the association between human gut flora and obesity, and the results provide new insights into the correlation of bacteria with the rising trend in obesity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus