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A miracle that accelerates operating room functionality: sugammadex.

Dogan E, Akdemir MS, Guzel A, Yildirim MB, Yildirim ZB, Kuyumcu M, Gümüş A, Akelma H - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: No statistically significant differences were detected in the hemodynamic parameters before and after sugammadex application.From the time of administration of sugammadex to the second postoperative hour, no side effects or complications occurred.Sugammadex was successfully used to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in patients where neostigmine was insufficient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University Medical School, Diyarbakir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Background: Sugammadex offers a good alternative to the conventional decurarisation process currently performed with cholinesterase inhibitors. Sugammadex, which was developed specifically for the aminosteroid-structured rocuronium and vecuronium neuromuscular blockers, is a modified cyclodextrin made up of 8 glucose monomers arranged in a cylindrical shape.

Methods: In this study, the goal was to investigate the efficacy of sugammadex. Sugammadex was used when there was insufficient decurarisation following neostigmine. This study was performed on 14 patients who experienced insufficient decurarisation (TOF <0.9) with neostigmine after general anaesthesia in the operating rooms of a university and a state hospital between June, 2012, and January, 2014. A dose of 2 mg/kg of sugammadex was administered.

Results: Time elapsed until sugammadex administration following neostigmine 37 ± 6 min, following sugammadex it took 2.1 ± 0.9 min to reach TOF ≥0.9, and the extubation time was 3.2 ± 1.4 min. No statistically significant differences were detected in the hemodynamic parameters before and after sugammadex application. From the time of administration of sugammadex to the second postoperative hour, no side effects or complications occurred. None of the patients experienced acute respiratory failure or residual block during this time period.

Conclusion: Sugammadex was successfully used to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in patients where neostigmine was insufficient.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean pulse rate and blood pressure values before sugammadex administration (0 min) and at the first and fifth min following sugammadex administration (p: pulse/min, map: mean arterial pressure/mmHg).
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fig1: Mean pulse rate and blood pressure values before sugammadex administration (0 min) and at the first and fifth min following sugammadex administration (p: pulse/min, map: mean arterial pressure/mmHg).

Mentions: Immediately before sugammadex administration, the patients had a mean pulse rate of 80 beats/min and mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 73 mmHg. The patients' pulse rate at the first minute following sugammadex administration was 80 beats/min and their mean arterial pressure (MAP) was 73 mmHg. At the fifth minute following sugammadex administration, the mean pulse was 81 beats/min and the mean arterial pressure was 73 mmHg. The patients' pulse rate before and 1 minute and 5 minutes after sugammadex administration did not differ significantly (P > 0.05, P > 0.05). The mean arterial pressure of the patients before and 1minute and 5 minutes after sugammadex administration also did not differ significantly (P > 0.05, P > 0.05 (Figure 1)).


A miracle that accelerates operating room functionality: sugammadex.

Dogan E, Akdemir MS, Guzel A, Yildirim MB, Yildirim ZB, Kuyumcu M, Gümüş A, Akelma H - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Mean pulse rate and blood pressure values before sugammadex administration (0 min) and at the first and fifth min following sugammadex administration (p: pulse/min, map: mean arterial pressure/mmHg).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150404&req=5

fig1: Mean pulse rate and blood pressure values before sugammadex administration (0 min) and at the first and fifth min following sugammadex administration (p: pulse/min, map: mean arterial pressure/mmHg).
Mentions: Immediately before sugammadex administration, the patients had a mean pulse rate of 80 beats/min and mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 73 mmHg. The patients' pulse rate at the first minute following sugammadex administration was 80 beats/min and their mean arterial pressure (MAP) was 73 mmHg. At the fifth minute following sugammadex administration, the mean pulse was 81 beats/min and the mean arterial pressure was 73 mmHg. The patients' pulse rate before and 1 minute and 5 minutes after sugammadex administration did not differ significantly (P > 0.05, P > 0.05). The mean arterial pressure of the patients before and 1minute and 5 minutes after sugammadex administration also did not differ significantly (P > 0.05, P > 0.05 (Figure 1)).

Bottom Line: No statistically significant differences were detected in the hemodynamic parameters before and after sugammadex application.From the time of administration of sugammadex to the second postoperative hour, no side effects or complications occurred.Sugammadex was successfully used to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in patients where neostigmine was insufficient.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University Medical School, Diyarbakir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Background: Sugammadex offers a good alternative to the conventional decurarisation process currently performed with cholinesterase inhibitors. Sugammadex, which was developed specifically for the aminosteroid-structured rocuronium and vecuronium neuromuscular blockers, is a modified cyclodextrin made up of 8 glucose monomers arranged in a cylindrical shape.

Methods: In this study, the goal was to investigate the efficacy of sugammadex. Sugammadex was used when there was insufficient decurarisation following neostigmine. This study was performed on 14 patients who experienced insufficient decurarisation (TOF <0.9) with neostigmine after general anaesthesia in the operating rooms of a university and a state hospital between June, 2012, and January, 2014. A dose of 2 mg/kg of sugammadex was administered.

Results: Time elapsed until sugammadex administration following neostigmine 37 ± 6 min, following sugammadex it took 2.1 ± 0.9 min to reach TOF ≥0.9, and the extubation time was 3.2 ± 1.4 min. No statistically significant differences were detected in the hemodynamic parameters before and after sugammadex application. From the time of administration of sugammadex to the second postoperative hour, no side effects or complications occurred. None of the patients experienced acute respiratory failure or residual block during this time period.

Conclusion: Sugammadex was successfully used to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in patients where neostigmine was insufficient.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus