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Sailing can improve quality of life of people with severe mental disorders: results of a cross over randomized controlled trial.

Carta MG, Maggiani F, Pilutzu L, Moro MF, Mura G, Sancassiani F, Vellante V, Migliaccio GM, Machado S, Nardi AE, Preti A - Clin Pract Epidemiol Ment Health (2014)

Bottom Line: The participants enrolled in the study were outpatients diagnosed with severe chronic mental disorders.This improvement was comparable to the improvement in psychopathologic status and social functioning as shown in a previous report of the same research project.In all likelihood, a program grounded on learning how to manage a sailing vessel - during which patients perform cruises that emphasize the exploration of the marine environment by sailing - might be interesting enough and capture the attention of the patients so as to favour greater effectiveness of standard rehabilitation protocols, but this should be specifically tested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro di Psichiatria di Consulenza e Psicosomatica AUOC Cagliari and University of Cagliari, #CONI, Italian Olympic Committee - Sardinia.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a sailing rehabilitation program on the quality of life (QoL) in a sample of patients with severe mental disorders. The study adopted a randomized, crossover, waiting-list controlled design. The participants enrolled in the study were outpatients diagnosed with severe chronic mental disorders. The participants (N=40) exposed to rehabilitation with sailing took part in a series of supervised cruises near the gulf of Cagliari, South Sardinia, and showed a statistically significant improvement of their quality of life compared to the control group. This improvement was comparable to the improvement in psychopathologic status and social functioning as shown in a previous report of the same research project. The improvement was maintained at follow-up only during the trial and for a few months later: after 12 months, patients returned to their baseline values and their quality of life showed a worsening trend. This is the first study to show that rehabilitation with sailing may improve the quality of life of people with severe chronic mental disorders. In all likelihood, a program grounded on learning how to manage a sailing vessel - during which patients perform cruises that emphasize the exploration of the marine environment by sailing - might be interesting enough and capture the attention of the patients so as to favour greater effectiveness of standard rehabilitation protocols, but this should be specifically tested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of scores on the WHOQoL-Bref by subscale at baseline and at end of treatment in treated cases and in controls.
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Figure 1: Distribution of scores on the WHOQoL-Bref by subscale at baseline and at end of treatment in treated cases and in controls.


Sailing can improve quality of life of people with severe mental disorders: results of a cross over randomized controlled trial.

Carta MG, Maggiani F, Pilutzu L, Moro MF, Mura G, Sancassiani F, Vellante V, Migliaccio GM, Machado S, Nardi AE, Preti A - Clin Pract Epidemiol Ment Health (2014)

Distribution of scores on the WHOQoL-Bref by subscale at baseline and at end of treatment in treated cases and in controls.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150378&req=5

Figure 1: Distribution of scores on the WHOQoL-Bref by subscale at baseline and at end of treatment in treated cases and in controls.
Bottom Line: The participants enrolled in the study were outpatients diagnosed with severe chronic mental disorders.This improvement was comparable to the improvement in psychopathologic status and social functioning as shown in a previous report of the same research project.In all likelihood, a program grounded on learning how to manage a sailing vessel - during which patients perform cruises that emphasize the exploration of the marine environment by sailing - might be interesting enough and capture the attention of the patients so as to favour greater effectiveness of standard rehabilitation protocols, but this should be specifically tested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro di Psichiatria di Consulenza e Psicosomatica AUOC Cagliari and University of Cagliari, #CONI, Italian Olympic Committee - Sardinia.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a sailing rehabilitation program on the quality of life (QoL) in a sample of patients with severe mental disorders. The study adopted a randomized, crossover, waiting-list controlled design. The participants enrolled in the study were outpatients diagnosed with severe chronic mental disorders. The participants (N=40) exposed to rehabilitation with sailing took part in a series of supervised cruises near the gulf of Cagliari, South Sardinia, and showed a statistically significant improvement of their quality of life compared to the control group. This improvement was comparable to the improvement in psychopathologic status and social functioning as shown in a previous report of the same research project. The improvement was maintained at follow-up only during the trial and for a few months later: after 12 months, patients returned to their baseline values and their quality of life showed a worsening trend. This is the first study to show that rehabilitation with sailing may improve the quality of life of people with severe chronic mental disorders. In all likelihood, a program grounded on learning how to manage a sailing vessel - during which patients perform cruises that emphasize the exploration of the marine environment by sailing - might be interesting enough and capture the attention of the patients so as to favour greater effectiveness of standard rehabilitation protocols, but this should be specifically tested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus