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Coexistent axillary hydatid disease and tuberculosis: Case report of an extremely rare occurrence.

Bahadur S, Pujani M, Jetley S, Hassan MJ, Khetrapal S, Husain M - J Cytol (2014)

Bottom Line: To the best of our knowledge, even after extensive search of the literature we did not come across any such case.Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a cost-effective procedure performed on an outpatient basis and helped clinch a prompt diagnosis, with minimum discomfort or complications.The role of FNAC in early diagnosis cannot be overemphasized.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research (HIMSR), Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Tuberculous infection is highly prevalent in India, however, hydatid disease is relatively uncommon. Frequent sites of predilection of hydatid disease are the liver and lungs. Other unusual sites of infliction are the peritoneum, thyroid, breast, pancreas, and mediastinum. Hydatid disease in the axilla is quite uncommon. We hereby report a case of coexistent axillary hydatid disease with tuberculous lymphadenitis. To the best of our knowledge, even after extensive search of the literature we did not come across any such case. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a cost-effective procedure performed on an outpatient basis and helped clinch a prompt diagnosis, with minimum discomfort or complications. The role of FNAC in early diagnosis cannot be overemphasized.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photomicrograph showing the semi-transluscent, refractile hooklet of Echinococcus (Ziehl Neelsen Stain, ×1000)
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F2a: Photomicrograph showing the semi-transluscent, refractile hooklet of Echinococcus (Ziehl Neelsen Stain, ×1000)

Mentions: Smears were cellular showing intact and degenerated neutrophils, histiocytes, and eosinophils, along with several loose epithelioid cell granulomas, giant cells, and a variable number of lymphoid cells [Figure 1a]. The background showed extensive caseous necrosis. When the ZN stained smears were being screened for the presence of acid fast bacilli, classical hooklets of Echinococcus were noticed [Figure 2a]. The hooklets were semi-translucent, retractile, and sickle-shaped, with an inner semi-translucent core of a similar shape. Alerted by this discovery, a further search revealed scolices of Echinococcus, which were large ovoid structures [Figure 2b]. However, no lamellated membrane was identified. In addition, classic granular, beaded, acid fast bacilli of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were seen [Figure 1b]. This enabled us to render a diagnosis of tuberculous lymphadenitis with coexistent echinococcal infection.


Coexistent axillary hydatid disease and tuberculosis: Case report of an extremely rare occurrence.

Bahadur S, Pujani M, Jetley S, Hassan MJ, Khetrapal S, Husain M - J Cytol (2014)

Photomicrograph showing the semi-transluscent, refractile hooklet of Echinococcus (Ziehl Neelsen Stain, ×1000)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150339&req=5

F2a: Photomicrograph showing the semi-transluscent, refractile hooklet of Echinococcus (Ziehl Neelsen Stain, ×1000)
Mentions: Smears were cellular showing intact and degenerated neutrophils, histiocytes, and eosinophils, along with several loose epithelioid cell granulomas, giant cells, and a variable number of lymphoid cells [Figure 1a]. The background showed extensive caseous necrosis. When the ZN stained smears were being screened for the presence of acid fast bacilli, classical hooklets of Echinococcus were noticed [Figure 2a]. The hooklets were semi-translucent, retractile, and sickle-shaped, with an inner semi-translucent core of a similar shape. Alerted by this discovery, a further search revealed scolices of Echinococcus, which were large ovoid structures [Figure 2b]. However, no lamellated membrane was identified. In addition, classic granular, beaded, acid fast bacilli of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were seen [Figure 1b]. This enabled us to render a diagnosis of tuberculous lymphadenitis with coexistent echinococcal infection.

Bottom Line: To the best of our knowledge, even after extensive search of the literature we did not come across any such case.Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a cost-effective procedure performed on an outpatient basis and helped clinch a prompt diagnosis, with minimum discomfort or complications.The role of FNAC in early diagnosis cannot be overemphasized.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research (HIMSR), Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Tuberculous infection is highly prevalent in India, however, hydatid disease is relatively uncommon. Frequent sites of predilection of hydatid disease are the liver and lungs. Other unusual sites of infliction are the peritoneum, thyroid, breast, pancreas, and mediastinum. Hydatid disease in the axilla is quite uncommon. We hereby report a case of coexistent axillary hydatid disease with tuberculous lymphadenitis. To the best of our knowledge, even after extensive search of the literature we did not come across any such case. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a cost-effective procedure performed on an outpatient basis and helped clinch a prompt diagnosis, with minimum discomfort or complications. The role of FNAC in early diagnosis cannot be overemphasized.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus