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Correlation between the cytology of urine sediment in fresh sample and smears stained by Papanicolaou and Giemsa methods.

Palaoro LA, Angerosa M - J Cytol (2014)

Bottom Line: Urine excreted by the body has a variable composition in different physiological and pathological conditions.The meticulous observation of fresh urinary sediments allowed identification of diverse cellular types associated with varied pathologies.The cytological examination of urinary samples in fresh smears, and its later diagnostic confirmation with the Papanicolaou stain is important not only as a diagnostic procedure of tumoral or non-tumoral pathologies, but also as a method for the 'screening' of pre-cancerous lesions or carcinoma in situ, especially in high-risk populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Professor of Cytology, Clinical Hospital "José de San Martín", Buenos Aires University, Argentina ; Professor of Clinical Biochemistry, Instituto De Fisiopatologia Y Bioquimica Clinica, Argentina.

ABSTRACT

Background: Urine excreted by the body has a variable composition in different physiological and pathological conditions. The cells that come from the renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, and urethra are carried by the urine, and therefore, they can be observed in fresh samples and in smears with Giemsa and Papanicolaou stain.

Aim: The aim of this study was to show that high correlation that exists between the cytological examination of fresh urine samples and smears stained with Papanicolaou and Giemsa methods.

Materials and methods: A total of 45 cases with no tumor of the urinary tract and 36 patients with lower urinary tract neoplasms were included in the study (20: Low-grade urothelial tumors; 16: High-grade urothelial tumors, squamous carcinomas, and adenocarcinomas). The sediments in the urine samples were observed in fresh specimen and in smears stained with Papanicolaou method.

Results: The meticulous observation of fresh urinary sediments allowed identification of diverse cellular types associated with varied pathologies.

Conclusions: The cytological examination of urinary samples in fresh smears, and its later diagnostic confirmation with the Papanicolaou stain is important not only as a diagnostic procedure of tumoral or non-tumoral pathologies, but also as a method for the 'screening' of pre-cancerous lesions or carcinoma in situ, especially in high-risk populations.

No MeSH data available.


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Non-tumoral pathology corresponding to Polyomavirus. (a and b) Cells with high N/C ratio. Nuclei of ‘empty’ aspect (thin arrow), with clumps of chromatin on their membranes (thick arrow) Fresh smear (Optical microscopy, ×400). (c and d) Cells with high N/C ratio and blurred chromatin (white arrow), sometimes presenting clumps on the membranes, characteristic of Polyomavirus infection. Notice that some cells have a cytoplasmic tail like a ‘comet’ (black arrow) (Giemsa stain, ×500)
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Figure 3: Non-tumoral pathology corresponding to Polyomavirus. (a and b) Cells with high N/C ratio. Nuclei of ‘empty’ aspect (thin arrow), with clumps of chromatin on their membranes (thick arrow) Fresh smear (Optical microscopy, ×400). (c and d) Cells with high N/C ratio and blurred chromatin (white arrow), sometimes presenting clumps on the membranes, characteristic of Polyomavirus infection. Notice that some cells have a cytoplasmic tail like a ‘comet’ (black arrow) (Giemsa stain, ×500)

Mentions: Giemsa stained smears: We observed nuclei with high N/C ratio and basophilic amorphous inclusions that occupied the entire nucleus or were located on the nuclear membranes, obscuring the chromatic structure. These morphological characteristics were due to infection by the Polyomaviruses [Figure 3].


Correlation between the cytology of urine sediment in fresh sample and smears stained by Papanicolaou and Giemsa methods.

Palaoro LA, Angerosa M - J Cytol (2014)

Non-tumoral pathology corresponding to Polyomavirus. (a and b) Cells with high N/C ratio. Nuclei of ‘empty’ aspect (thin arrow), with clumps of chromatin on their membranes (thick arrow) Fresh smear (Optical microscopy, ×400). (c and d) Cells with high N/C ratio and blurred chromatin (white arrow), sometimes presenting clumps on the membranes, characteristic of Polyomavirus infection. Notice that some cells have a cytoplasmic tail like a ‘comet’ (black arrow) (Giemsa stain, ×500)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150338&req=5

Figure 3: Non-tumoral pathology corresponding to Polyomavirus. (a and b) Cells with high N/C ratio. Nuclei of ‘empty’ aspect (thin arrow), with clumps of chromatin on their membranes (thick arrow) Fresh smear (Optical microscopy, ×400). (c and d) Cells with high N/C ratio and blurred chromatin (white arrow), sometimes presenting clumps on the membranes, characteristic of Polyomavirus infection. Notice that some cells have a cytoplasmic tail like a ‘comet’ (black arrow) (Giemsa stain, ×500)
Mentions: Giemsa stained smears: We observed nuclei with high N/C ratio and basophilic amorphous inclusions that occupied the entire nucleus or were located on the nuclear membranes, obscuring the chromatic structure. These morphological characteristics were due to infection by the Polyomaviruses [Figure 3].

Bottom Line: Urine excreted by the body has a variable composition in different physiological and pathological conditions.The meticulous observation of fresh urinary sediments allowed identification of diverse cellular types associated with varied pathologies.The cytological examination of urinary samples in fresh smears, and its later diagnostic confirmation with the Papanicolaou stain is important not only as a diagnostic procedure of tumoral or non-tumoral pathologies, but also as a method for the 'screening' of pre-cancerous lesions or carcinoma in situ, especially in high-risk populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Professor of Cytology, Clinical Hospital "José de San Martín", Buenos Aires University, Argentina ; Professor of Clinical Biochemistry, Instituto De Fisiopatologia Y Bioquimica Clinica, Argentina.

ABSTRACT

Background: Urine excreted by the body has a variable composition in different physiological and pathological conditions. The cells that come from the renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, and urethra are carried by the urine, and therefore, they can be observed in fresh samples and in smears with Giemsa and Papanicolaou stain.

Aim: The aim of this study was to show that high correlation that exists between the cytological examination of fresh urine samples and smears stained with Papanicolaou and Giemsa methods.

Materials and methods: A total of 45 cases with no tumor of the urinary tract and 36 patients with lower urinary tract neoplasms were included in the study (20: Low-grade urothelial tumors; 16: High-grade urothelial tumors, squamous carcinomas, and adenocarcinomas). The sediments in the urine samples were observed in fresh specimen and in smears stained with Papanicolaou method.

Results: The meticulous observation of fresh urinary sediments allowed identification of diverse cellular types associated with varied pathologies.

Conclusions: The cytological examination of urinary samples in fresh smears, and its later diagnostic confirmation with the Papanicolaou stain is important not only as a diagnostic procedure of tumoral or non-tumoral pathologies, but also as a method for the 'screening' of pre-cancerous lesions or carcinoma in situ, especially in high-risk populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus