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Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

Tamisiea ME, Hughes CW, Williams SD, Bingley RM - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records.Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level.Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK mtam@noc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimate of the vertical land motion across the UK derived from a GNSS solution provided by the NERC British Isles continuous GNSS Facility (BIGF). Dots indicate the positions of the GNSS stations that contributed to the solution. The map of vertical land motion is an interpolation from the estimates at these sites.
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RSTA20130336F8: Estimate of the vertical land motion across the UK derived from a GNSS solution provided by the NERC British Isles continuous GNSS Facility (BIGF). Dots indicate the positions of the GNSS stations that contributed to the solution. The map of vertical land motion is an interpolation from the estimates at these sites.

Mentions: In the UK, GNSS data are archived at the NERC British Isles continuous GNSS Facility (BIGF). The longest time series in the archive are around 17 years long, but these are from a fairly sparse set of locations. More recently, the number of available stations has increased to over 150 [110]. Analysis of the data provides a fairly compelling picture of GIA across the UK, as shown in figure 8. Regions under the centre of the former ice sheet are uplifting, whereas the surrounding regions are subsiding. As the spatial coverage and time span of the observations has improved, these inferred maps [110,111] of crustal motion have become more similar to the predicted GIA signal [107,112]. However, there is a continued requirement to collect the GNSS data to improve the solution and better understand the behaviour at some sites. For example, data from Sheerness are not included in figure 8 owing to the nonlinear behaviour of the record. Several other records were also excluded owing to their disagreement with nearby sites. In addition, continued collection of the data can assist in implementing improvements to the GNSS-processing models and techniques that also contribute to a better estimate of spatial pattern of vertical land motion.Figure 8.


Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

Tamisiea ME, Hughes CW, Williams SD, Bingley RM - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2014)

Estimate of the vertical land motion across the UK derived from a GNSS solution provided by the NERC British Isles continuous GNSS Facility (BIGF). Dots indicate the positions of the GNSS stations that contributed to the solution. The map of vertical land motion is an interpolation from the estimates at these sites.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150292&req=5

RSTA20130336F8: Estimate of the vertical land motion across the UK derived from a GNSS solution provided by the NERC British Isles continuous GNSS Facility (BIGF). Dots indicate the positions of the GNSS stations that contributed to the solution. The map of vertical land motion is an interpolation from the estimates at these sites.
Mentions: In the UK, GNSS data are archived at the NERC British Isles continuous GNSS Facility (BIGF). The longest time series in the archive are around 17 years long, but these are from a fairly sparse set of locations. More recently, the number of available stations has increased to over 150 [110]. Analysis of the data provides a fairly compelling picture of GIA across the UK, as shown in figure 8. Regions under the centre of the former ice sheet are uplifting, whereas the surrounding regions are subsiding. As the spatial coverage and time span of the observations has improved, these inferred maps [110,111] of crustal motion have become more similar to the predicted GIA signal [107,112]. However, there is a continued requirement to collect the GNSS data to improve the solution and better understand the behaviour at some sites. For example, data from Sheerness are not included in figure 8 owing to the nonlinear behaviour of the record. Several other records were also excluded owing to their disagreement with nearby sites. In addition, continued collection of the data can assist in implementing improvements to the GNSS-processing models and techniques that also contribute to a better estimate of spatial pattern of vertical land motion.Figure 8.

Bottom Line: The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records.Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level.Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK mtam@noc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus