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Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

Tamisiea ME, Hughes CW, Williams SD, Bingley RM - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records.Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level.Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK mtam@noc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Difference between the trends calculated from the TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry mission using the default set of processing models and an updated set. (Figure 2 adapted from [75]. Copyright © 2007 American Geophysical Union.) While there are many features in the map, the most notable feature is the north/south gradient in the difference, which is a result of switching from CSR95, the default reference frame for the TOPEX/Poseidon products, to ITRF2005, the state-of-the-art reference frame at the time of the analysis. The normalized histogram on the bottom serves as the colour bar for the rate differences.
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RSTA20130336F7: Difference between the trends calculated from the TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry mission using the default set of processing models and an updated set. (Figure 2 adapted from [75]. Copyright © 2007 American Geophysical Union.) While there are many features in the map, the most notable feature is the north/south gradient in the difference, which is a result of switching from CSR95, the default reference frame for the TOPEX/Poseidon products, to ITRF2005, the state-of-the-art reference frame at the time of the analysis. The normalized histogram on the bottom serves as the colour bar for the rate differences.

Mentions: One of the best examples of the importance of geocentre motion for sea-level change is shown in figure 7. Beckley et al. [75] investigated the effect of reprocessing the TOPEX/Poseidon time series with a consistent and recent (at the time) set of analysis parameters. The resulting difference in the estimated sea-level trends between the new results and a previous analysis is shown in figure 7. While several features can be identified in this difference map, the most notable is south to north increase in the estimated trends, with the rates in the Southern Ocean decreasing by a millimetre per year and those in the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans increasing by a similar amount. This pattern is due to the switch of the reference frame from CSR95, which was the standard for the TOPEX/Poseidon products, to ITRF2005, the best ITRF realization at the time of the study. While this change had a small impact on the global average, the local changes were quite significant.Figure 7.


Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

Tamisiea ME, Hughes CW, Williams SD, Bingley RM - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2014)

Difference between the trends calculated from the TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry mission using the default set of processing models and an updated set. (Figure 2 adapted from [75]. Copyright © 2007 American Geophysical Union.) While there are many features in the map, the most notable feature is the north/south gradient in the difference, which is a result of switching from CSR95, the default reference frame for the TOPEX/Poseidon products, to ITRF2005, the state-of-the-art reference frame at the time of the analysis. The normalized histogram on the bottom serves as the colour bar for the rate differences.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150292&req=5

RSTA20130336F7: Difference between the trends calculated from the TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry mission using the default set of processing models and an updated set. (Figure 2 adapted from [75]. Copyright © 2007 American Geophysical Union.) While there are many features in the map, the most notable feature is the north/south gradient in the difference, which is a result of switching from CSR95, the default reference frame for the TOPEX/Poseidon products, to ITRF2005, the state-of-the-art reference frame at the time of the analysis. The normalized histogram on the bottom serves as the colour bar for the rate differences.
Mentions: One of the best examples of the importance of geocentre motion for sea-level change is shown in figure 7. Beckley et al. [75] investigated the effect of reprocessing the TOPEX/Poseidon time series with a consistent and recent (at the time) set of analysis parameters. The resulting difference in the estimated sea-level trends between the new results and a previous analysis is shown in figure 7. While several features can be identified in this difference map, the most notable is south to north increase in the estimated trends, with the rates in the Southern Ocean decreasing by a millimetre per year and those in the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans increasing by a similar amount. This pattern is due to the switch of the reference frame from CSR95, which was the standard for the TOPEX/Poseidon products, to ITRF2005, the best ITRF realization at the time of the study. While this change had a small impact on the global average, the local changes were quite significant.Figure 7.

Bottom Line: The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records.Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level.Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK mtam@noc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus