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Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

Tamisiea ME, Hughes CW, Williams SD, Bingley RM - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records.Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level.Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK mtam@noc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Time series of the global average sea-level change from satellite altimetry (TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2). Note that this time series has not been corrected for a contribution owing to GIA, estimated to be − 0.3 mm per year. (b) Map of the trend calculated from the altimetry time series since 1992. Images from the NOAA Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry.
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RSTA20130336F6: (a) Time series of the global average sea-level change from satellite altimetry (TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2). Note that this time series has not been corrected for a contribution owing to GIA, estimated to be − 0.3 mm per year. (b) Map of the trend calculated from the altimetry time series since 1992. Images from the NOAA Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry.

Mentions: Altimetric data, particularly from the TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 satellite missions, have provided a near-global coverage of the SSH change since the early 1990s. The global-average altimeter sea-level time series shows a rate of nearly 3 mm per year, after accounting for the associated GIA change (figure 6a). However, beyond the simple linear trend in the data, there is significant interannual variability. The global map of sea surface trends over the period also demonstrates large spatial variations away from this global average (figure 6b). The amplitudes and spatial patterns of these changes are driven mainly by dynamic processes. For example, the notable increase of SSH of 1 cm per year in the western Pacific is driven primarily by an intensification of Pacific trade winds [60]. This regional increase could represent a multi-decadal mode in the ocean [61]. Indeed, identifying and removing decadal and multi-decadal modes [62,63], as well as atmospheric wind and pressure effects [64,65], from the observations is becoming an increasingly common practice to help identify other underlying variability, such as a long-term rise.Figure 6.


Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

Tamisiea ME, Hughes CW, Williams SD, Bingley RM - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2014)

(a) Time series of the global average sea-level change from satellite altimetry (TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2). Note that this time series has not been corrected for a contribution owing to GIA, estimated to be − 0.3 mm per year. (b) Map of the trend calculated from the altimetry time series since 1992. Images from the NOAA Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150292&req=5

RSTA20130336F6: (a) Time series of the global average sea-level change from satellite altimetry (TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2). Note that this time series has not been corrected for a contribution owing to GIA, estimated to be − 0.3 mm per year. (b) Map of the trend calculated from the altimetry time series since 1992. Images from the NOAA Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry.
Mentions: Altimetric data, particularly from the TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 satellite missions, have provided a near-global coverage of the SSH change since the early 1990s. The global-average altimeter sea-level time series shows a rate of nearly 3 mm per year, after accounting for the associated GIA change (figure 6a). However, beyond the simple linear trend in the data, there is significant interannual variability. The global map of sea surface trends over the period also demonstrates large spatial variations away from this global average (figure 6b). The amplitudes and spatial patterns of these changes are driven mainly by dynamic processes. For example, the notable increase of SSH of 1 cm per year in the western Pacific is driven primarily by an intensification of Pacific trade winds [60]. This regional increase could represent a multi-decadal mode in the ocean [61]. Indeed, identifying and removing decadal and multi-decadal modes [62,63], as well as atmospheric wind and pressure effects [64,65], from the observations is becoming an increasingly common practice to help identify other underlying variability, such as a long-term rise.Figure 6.

Bottom Line: The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records.Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level.Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK mtam@noc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus