Limits...
Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

Tamisiea ME, Hughes CW, Williams SD, Bingley RM - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records.Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level.Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK mtam@noc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tide gauge locations where the time series held by the PSMSL is greater than 50 years. This figure only includes gauges that have datum control (i.e. are in the RLR set), and thus can be used for long-term trend analysis. (Online version in colour.)
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RSTA20130336F5: Tide gauge locations where the time series held by the PSMSL is greater than 50 years. This figure only includes gauges that have datum control (i.e. are in the RLR set), and thus can be used for long-term trend analysis. (Online version in colour.)

Mentions: Since the publication of the initial collection of data, the PSMSL has continued its efforts and now holds data from over 2200 tide gauge locations and typically adds 1375 new station-years of data per year [48]. While this database provides the best long-term instrumental observations of sea-level change, there are limitations. In order to reduce the effects of decadal variability in the observations to obtain a more stable estimate of the trend, long time series are needed [54]. Unfortunately, nearly all of these long records are located in the Northern Hemisphere, with most in Europe (figure 5). This introduces greater uncertainty in establishing the global average rise. Given the importance of long records, there has been a concerted effort to recover historic tidal records, with more than 4000 station-years existing based on a recent global survey [55], and convert them to a digital form to allow analysis using modern techniques. A number of these studies have focused on extending modern tide gauge records in the Southern Hemisphere, such as Port Louis [56], Port Arthur [57] and Macquarie Island [58].Figure 5.


Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

Tamisiea ME, Hughes CW, Williams SD, Bingley RM - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2014)

Tide gauge locations where the time series held by the PSMSL is greater than 50 years. This figure only includes gauges that have datum control (i.e. are in the RLR set), and thus can be used for long-term trend analysis. (Online version in colour.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150292&req=5

RSTA20130336F5: Tide gauge locations where the time series held by the PSMSL is greater than 50 years. This figure only includes gauges that have datum control (i.e. are in the RLR set), and thus can be used for long-term trend analysis. (Online version in colour.)
Mentions: Since the publication of the initial collection of data, the PSMSL has continued its efforts and now holds data from over 2200 tide gauge locations and typically adds 1375 new station-years of data per year [48]. While this database provides the best long-term instrumental observations of sea-level change, there are limitations. In order to reduce the effects of decadal variability in the observations to obtain a more stable estimate of the trend, long time series are needed [54]. Unfortunately, nearly all of these long records are located in the Northern Hemisphere, with most in Europe (figure 5). This introduces greater uncertainty in establishing the global average rise. Given the importance of long records, there has been a concerted effort to recover historic tidal records, with more than 4000 station-years existing based on a recent global survey [55], and convert them to a digital form to allow analysis using modern techniques. A number of these studies have focused on extending modern tide gauge records in the Southern Hemisphere, such as Port Louis [56], Port Arthur [57] and Macquarie Island [58].Figure 5.

Bottom Line: The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records.Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level.Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK mtam@noc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus